make+void

  • 181 Reversing — Reverse Re*verse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[ e]*v[ e]rst );p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster] And that old… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 182 Supersede — Su per*sede , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Superseded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Superseding}.] [L. supersedere, supersessum, to sit above, be superior to, forbear, omit; super above + sedere to sit: cf. F. supers[ e]der. See {Sit}, and cf. {Surcease}.] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 183 Superseded — Supersede Su per*sede , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Superseded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Superseding}.] [L. supersedere, supersessum, to sit above, be superior to, forbear, omit; super above + sedere to sit: cf. F. supers[ e]der. See {Sit}, and cf.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 184 Superseding — Supersede Su per*sede , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Superseded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Superseding}.] [L. supersedere, supersessum, to sit above, be superior to, forbear, omit; super above + sedere to sit: cf. F. supers[ e]der. See {Sit}, and cf.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 185 To reverse a machine — Reverse Re*verse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[ e]*v[ e]rst );p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster] And that old… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 186 To reverse an engine — Reverse Re*verse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[ e]*v[ e]rst );p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster] And that old… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 187 Vacuate — Vac u*ate, v. t. [L. vacuatus, p. p. of vacuare to empty, from vacuus empty. See {Vacant}.] To make void, or empty. [R.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 188 rescind — transitive verb Etymology: Latin rescindere to annul, from re + scindere to cut more at shed Date: 1579 1. to take away ; remove 2. a. take back, cancel < refused to rescind the order > b. to abrogate (a …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 189 reverse — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English revers, from Anglo French, from Latin reversus, past participle of revertere to turn back more at revert Date: 14th century 1. a. opposite or contrary to a previous or normal condition < reverse order > b.… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 190 Alice Barnham — Alice Barnham, Viscountess St Albans, (1592 ndash; 1650), was the wife of English scientific philosopher and statesman Francis Bacon.FamilyShe was born 14 May, 1592, to Benedict Barnham and his wife Dorothea, née Smith. Benedict Barnham (1559… …

    Wikipedia

  • 191 Confession of judgment — is a legal term that refers to a type of contract (or a clause with such a provision) in which a party agrees to let the other party enter a judgment against him or her. Such contracts are highly controversial and may be invalidated as a… …

    Wikipedia

  • 192 G. C. Brewer — Grover Cleveland Brewer (1884–1956) was among the most famous 20th century leaders in the Churches of Christ. He was said to be among the giants of the brotherhood (Woods 246). G. C. Brewer was named for U.S. President Grover Cleveland, G. C.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 193 abolish — abolishable, adj. abolisher, n. abolishment, n. /euh bol ish/, v.t. to do away with; put an end to; annul; make void: to abolish slavery. [1425 75; late ME < MF aboliss , long s. of abolir < L abolere to destroy, efface, put an end to; change of… …

    Universalium

  • 194 annihilate — annihilative /euh nuy euh lay tiv, euh leuh /, annihilatory /euh nuy euh leuh tawr ee, tohr ee/, adj. /euh nuy euh layt /, v.t., annihilated, annihilating. 1. to reduce to utter ruin or nonexistence; destroy utterly: The heavy bombing almost… …

    Universalium

  • 195 annul — annullable, adj. /euh nul /, v.t., annulled, annulling. 1. (esp. of laws or other established rules, usages, etc.) to make void or null; abolish; cancel; invalidate: to annul a marriage. 2. to reduce to nothing; obliterate. 3. to cancel (a… …

    Universalium

  • 196 disannul — disannuller, n. disannulment, n. /dis euh nul /, v.t., disannulled, disannulling. to annul utterly; make void: to disannul a contract. [1485 95; DIS 1 + ANNUL] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 197 abolish — verb /əˈbɒlɪʃ/ a) To do away with wholly; to annul; to make void; to end a law, system, custom or institution Slavery was abolished in the nineteenth century. b) To put an end to or …

    Wiktionary

  • 198 avoid — verb /əˈvɔɪd/ a) To keep away from; to keep clear of; to endeavor not to meet; to shun; to abstain from; as, to avoid the company of gamesters. The devyll [...] sayde unto hym: all these will I geve the, iff thou wilt faull doune and worship me.… …

    Wiktionary

  • 199 annulment — To make void or to cancel. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …

    Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • 200 override — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. annul (see overrule); prevail. See superiority. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To dismiss] Syn. pass over, not heed, take no account of; see disregard , neglect 1 . 2. [To thwart] Syn. make void, reverse,… …

    English dictionary for students