make+use+of

  • 161Make A Difference — For the song by Blind Melon, see For My Friends. Make A Difference Founder(s) Jithin C Nedumala, Gloria Benny, Sujith Abraham Varkey Type 80G Founded …

    Wikipedia

  • 162make it — (from Idioms in Speech) (a) to succeed in traversing a certain distance; to reach the station in time to catch the train; to complete something in the allotted time set; With a bit of luck we should be there in about half an hour. We might even… …

    Idioms and examples

  • 163make — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. create, produce; prepare; obtain, cause, compel; amount to. See production, compulsion, form. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To produce] Syn. construct, fabricate, produce, manufacture, form, shape,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 164ˈmake sth ˌof sb/sth — phrasal verb 1) to understand someone or the meaning of something in a particular way I don t know what to make of our new teacher.[/ex] What do you make of this news?[/ex] 2) make the best of sth to try to get a good result despite a bad… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 165make with — phrasal slang : produce, perform usually used with the and in place of the idiomatic or normal verb start making with the answers let s not make with the jokes making with the tears make …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 166make — [OE] Make probably goes back ultimately to an Indo European base *mag denoting ‘kneading’ (also the source of Greek mágma ‘salve made by kneading’, from which English gets magma [15]). A prehistoric Germanic descendant was *mako (source of… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 167make — I. n 1a. American an identification or instance of recognition (of a suspect) 1b. American a check in official records on the identity of a suspect or on another piece of evidence ► Run a make on this guy, will you? ► Can we have a make on the… …

    Contemporary slang

  • 168make — [OE] Make probably goes back ultimately to an Indo European base *mag denoting ‘kneading’ (also the source of Greek mágma ‘salve made by kneading’, from which English gets magma [15]). A prehistoric Germanic descendant was *mako (source of… …

    Word origins

  • 169use something up — consume or expend the whole of something the money was soon used up ■ find a purpose for something that is left over I might use up all my odd scraps of wool to make a scarf ■ be used up informal (of a person) be worn out, esp. with overwork she… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 170make do — {v. phr.} To use a poor substitute when one does not have the right thing. * /John did not have a hammer, and he had to make do with a heavy rock./ * /This motel isn t what we wanted, but we must make do./ * /Many families manage to make do on… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 171make something of — {v. phr.} 1. To make (something) seem important. * /When girls see another girl with a boy, they often try to make something of it./ 2. To start a fight over; use as an excuse to start a quarrel. * /Bob accidentally shoved Bill in the corridor,… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 172make the most of — {v. phr.} To do the most you can with; get the most from; use to the greatest advantage. * /She planned the weekend in town to make the most of it./ * /George studied hard. He wanted to make the most of his chance to learn./ * /The teacher went… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 173make do — {v. phr.} To use a poor substitute when one does not have the right thing. * /John did not have a hammer, and he had to make do with a heavy rock./ * /This motel isn t what we wanted, but we must make do./ * /Many families manage to make do on… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 174make something of — {v. phr.} 1. To make (something) seem important. * /When girls see another girl with a boy, they often try to make something of it./ 2. To start a fight over; use as an excuse to start a quarrel. * /Bob accidentally shoved Bill in the corridor,… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 175make the most of — {v. phr.} To do the most you can with; get the most from; use to the greatest advantage. * /She planned the weekend in town to make the most of it./ * /George studied hard. He wanted to make the most of his chance to learn./ * /The teacher went… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 176make\ do — v. phr. To use a poor substitute when one does not have the right thing. John did not have a hammer, and he had to make do with a heavy rock. This motel isn t what we wanted, but we must make do. Many families manage to make do on very little… …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 177make\ do\ with — v. phr. To use a poor substitute when one does not have the right thing. John did not have a hammer, and he had to make do with a heavy rock. This motel isn t what we wanted, but we must make do. Many families manage to make do on very little… …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 178make\ smth\ of — v. phr. 1. To make (smth) seem important. When girls see another girl with a boy, they often try to make something of it. 2. To start a fight over; use as an excuse to start a quarrel. Bob accidentally shoved Bill in the corridor, and Bill made… …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 179make\ the\ most\ of — v. phr. To do the most you can with; get the most from; use to the greatest advantage. She planned the weekend in town to make the most of it. George studied hard. He wanted to make the most of his chance to learn. The teacher went out of the… …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 180make with the something — in. to make something visible; to use something. □ Come on, make with the cash. □ I want to know. Come on, make with the answers! …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions