lay+hold+of

  • 121To hold out — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 122To hold up — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 123To hold water — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 124To lay hands on — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 125de|lay´er — de|lay «dih LAY», verb, noun. –v.t. 1. to put off till a later time: »We will delay the party for a week and hold it next Saturday. 2. to make late; keep waiting; hinder the progress of: »The accident delayed the train for two hours. Ignorance… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 126de|lay — «dih LAY», verb, noun. –v.t. 1. to put off till a later time: »We will delay the party for a week and hold it next Saturday. 2. to make late; keep waiting; hinder the progress of: »The accident delayed the train for two hours. Ignorance delays… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 127To lay on the shelf — Shelf Shelf, n.; pl. {Shelves}. [OE. shelfe, schelfe, AS. scylfe; akin to G. schelfe, Icel. skj[=a]lf. In senses 2 & 3, perhaps a different word (cf. {Shelve}, v. i.).] 1. (Arch.) A flat tablet or ledge of any material set horizontally at a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 128To hold hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 129To lay against the field — Field Field (f[=e]ld), n. [OE. feld, fild, AS. feld; akin to D. veld, G. feld, Sw. f[ a]lt, Dan. felt, Icel. fold field of grass, AS. folde earth, land, ground, OS. folda.] 1. Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture; cultivated ground; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 130a|hold — a|hold1 «uh HOHLD», noun. U.S. Dialect or Informal. a hold: »He also passes notes to me during school…and if the teacher got ahold of one I would just die in my seat (Chicago Sun Times). a|hold2 «uh HOHLD», adverb. Nautical. near or close to the… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 131get hold of — Synonyms and related words: abduct, absorb, annex, appreciate, apprehend, ascertain, assimilate, be informed, be with one, become acquainted with, broaden the mind, carry off, catch, catch on, comprehend, conceive, cram the mind, determine, dig,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 132Laid — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 133Laying — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 134corona — Hold Hold (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 135pause — Hold Hold (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 136stronghold — Hold Hold (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 137Tickle Cove Pond — was written by Mark Walker (songwriter), a fisherman and song writer who lived in Tickle Cove, Bonavista Bay in Newfoundland, Canada during the late 1800s. This song is prized locally for the beauty and wit of the lyrics, which turn a mundane… …

    Wikipedia

  • 138Taking — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Taking >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 taking taking &c. >V. Sgm: N 1 reception reception &c.(taking in) 296 Sgm: N 1 deglutition deglutition &c.(taking food) 298 Sgm: N 1 appropriation appropriation prehension …

    English dictionary for students

  • 139seize — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. grasp, clutch; capture, arrest, appropriate, confiscate; afflict; attach, distrain; comprehend, understand. See stealing, intelligence, acquisition. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To grasp] Syn. take, take …

    English dictionary for students

  • 140rationalism — rationalist, n. rationalistic, rationalistical, adj. rationalistically, adv. /rash euh nl iz euhm/, n. 1. the principle or habit of accepting reason as the supreme authority in matters of opinion, belief, or conduct. 2. Philos. a. the doctrine… …

    Universalium