irony

  • 21irony — noun (plural nies) Etymology: Latin ironia, from Greek eirōnia, from eirōn dissembler Date: 1502 1. a pretense of ignorance and of willingness to learn from another assumed in order to make the other s false conceptions conspicuous by adroit… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 22irony — 1. noun /ˈaɪə.rən.i,ˈaɪ.rə.ni,ˈaɪ.ɚ.ni/ a) A statement that, when taken in context, may actually mean something different from, or the opposite of what is written literally; the use of words expressing something other than their literal intention …

    Wiktionary

  • 23IRONY —    is a subtle figure of speech in which, while one thing is said, some indication serves to show that quite the opposite is meant; thus apparent praise becomes severe condemnation or ridicule; practical irony is evinced in ostensibly furthering… …

    The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • 24irony — [16] Irony has no etymological connection with iron. It comes via Latin īrōnia from Greek eirōneíā, which signified ‘deliberately pretending ignorance, particularly as a rhetorical device to get the better of one’s opponent in argument’. This was …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 25irony — {{11}}irony (adj.) of or resembling iron, late 14c., from IRON (Cf. iron) (n.) + Y (Cf. y) (2). {{12}}irony (n.) c.1500, from L. ironia, from Gk. eironeia dissimulation, assumed ignorance, from eiron dissembler, perhaps related to eirein to speak …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 26irony — noun 1) that note of irony in her voice Syn: sarcasm, causticity, cynicism, mockery, satire, sardonicism See note at wit Ant: sincerity 2) the irony of the situation …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 27irony — noun 1) that note of irony in her voice Syn: sarcasm, bitterness, mockery, ridicule, derision, scorn; Brit.; informal sarkiness 2) the irony of the situation Syn: paradox • …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 28irony — I. /ˈaɪrəni / (say uyruhnee) noun (plural ironies) 1. a figure of speech or literary device in which the literal meaning is the opposite of that intended, especially, as in the Greek sense, when the locution understates the effect intended,… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 29irony — [16] Irony has no etymological connection with iron. It comes via Latin īrōnia from Greek eirōneíā, which signified ‘deliberately pretending ignorance, particularly as a rhetorical device to get the better of one’s opponent in argument’. This was …

    Word origins

  • 30irony — See irony, satire, sarcasm …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 31irony — 01. I think it s [ironic] that Jennifer, who swore she would never have kids and thought they were all brats, is now the happiest mother in the world. 02. [Ironically], many of the foreign music styles that have been most influential on today s… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 32irony — When something is made of iron or has iron characteristics. Man, this place sure has a lot of irony …

    Dictionary of american slang

  • 33irony — When something is made of iron or has iron characteristics. Man, this place sure has a lot of irony …

    Dictionary of american slang

  • 34irony — irony1 [ ʌɪrəni] noun (plural ironies) the expression of meaning through the use of language signifying the opposite, typically for humorous effect. ↘a state of affairs that appears perversely contrary to what one expects. ↘(also dramatic or… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 35irony — Synonyms and related words: Atticism, Janus, agile wit, ambiguity, ambiguousness, ambivalence, amphibology, antinomy, biformity, bifurcation, black humor, burlesque, caricature, causticity, comedy, complexity of meaning, conjugation, cynicism,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 36irony — A statement in the narrative which bears a meaning in the context which the readers understand differently. An example is in John 18:14 where Caiaphas approves the condemnation of Jesus on grounds of political expediency but by the Christian… …

    Dictionary of the Bible

  • 37irony — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. ridicule, satire, sarcasm. See figurative. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. sarcasm, wit, humor, paradox, incongruity, double meaning, twist, absurdity, ridicule, raillery, mockery, burlesque, parody, quip,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 38irony — i·ron·y || aɪə(r)nɪ n. sarcasm, speech or writing which is intended to communicate a meaning contrary to its literal sense; contrast between what is expected or desired and reality …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 39irony — n. Mockery (saying one thing and meaning the opposite) …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 40irony — n 1. incongruity, incongruousness, absurdity, illogicality; contrariety, contradiction, paradox, enigma; double entendre, Rhet. enantiosis. 2. derision, ridicule, sarcasm, scorn, mockery, cynicism, Rhet. asteism; satire, lampoon, burlesque,… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder