incongruity

  • 101Inconsistent — In con*sist ent, a. [Pref. in not + consistent: cf. F. inconsistant.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not consistent; showing inconsistency; irreconcilable; contradictory, or having contradictory implications; discordant; at variance, esp. as regards character …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 102law of the excluded middle — Contradiction Con tra*dic tion, n. [L. contradictio answer, objection: cf. F. contradiction.] 1. An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 103Principle of contradiction — Contradiction Con tra*dic tion, n. [L. contradictio answer, objection: cf. F. contradiction.] 1. An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 104Quaint — Quaint, a. [OE. queint, queynte, coint, prudent, wise, cunning, pretty, odd, OF. cointe cultivated, amiable, agreeable, neat, fr. L. cognitus known, p. p. of cognoscere to know; con + noscere (for gnoscere) to know. See {Know}, and cf. {Acquaint} …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 105Solecism — Sol e*cism, n.[F. sol[ e]cisme, L. soloecismus, Gr. soloikismo s, fr. soloiki zein to speak or write incorrectly, fr. so loikos speaking incorrectly, from the corruption of the Attic dialect among the Athenian colonists of So loi in Cilicia.] 1.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 106Step — Step, n. [AS. st[ae]pe. See {Step}, v. i.] 1. An advance or movement made by one removal of the foot; a pace. [1913 Webster] 2. A rest, or one of a set of rests, for the foot in ascending or descending, as a stair, or a round of a ladder. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 107Step grate — Step Step, n. [AS. st[ae]pe. See {Step}, v. i.] 1. An advance or movement made by one removal of the foot; a pace. [1913 Webster] 2. A rest, or one of a set of rests, for the foot in ascending or descending, as a stair, or a round of a ladder.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 108To take steps — Step Step, n. [AS. st[ae]pe. See {Step}, v. i.] 1. An advance or movement made by one removal of the foot; a pace. [1913 Webster] 2. A rest, or one of a set of rests, for the foot in ascending or descending, as a stair, or a round of a ladder.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 109Unconformity — Un con*form i*ty, n. 1. Want of conformity; incongruity; inconsistency. South. [1913 Webster] 2. (Geol.) Want of parallelism between strata in contact. [1913 Webster] Note: With some authors unconformity is equivalent to unconformability; but it… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 110anomalous — adjective Etymology: Late Latin anomalus, from Greek anōmalos, literally, uneven, from a + homalos even, from homos same more at same Date: 1655 1. inconsistent with or deviating from what is usual, normal, or expected ; irregular, unusual 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 111contradiction — noun Date: 14th century 1. act or an instance of contradicting 2. a. a proposition, statement, or phrase that asserts or implies both the truth and falsity of something b. a statement or phrase whose parts contradict each other < a round square&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 112incongruence — noun Date: 1610 incongruity …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 113ludicrous — adjective Etymology: Latin ludicrus, from ludus play, sport; perhaps akin to Greek loidoros abusive Date: 1712 1. amusing or laughable through obvious absurdity, incongruity, exaggeration, or eccentricity 2. meriting derisive laughter or scorn as …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 114mannerism — noun Date: 1803 1. a. exaggerated or affected adherence to a particular style or manner ; artificiality, preciosity < refined almost to the point of mannerism Winthrop Sargeant > b. often capitalized an art style in late 16th century Europe&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 115different — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin different , differens, present participle of differre Date: 14th century 1. partly or totally unlike in nature, form, or quality ; dissimilar < could hardly be more different > often followed by&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 116discord — I. noun Etymology: Middle English descorde, discord, from Anglo French descorde, from Latin discordia, from discord , discors Date: 13th century 1. a. lack of agreement or harmony (as between persons, things, or ideas) b. active quarreling or&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 117Citizen Kane — Citizen Kane …

    Wikipedia

  • 118Freemasonry — Freemasons redirects here. For other uses, see Freemasons (disambiguation). Masonic redirects here. For the ghost town in California, see Masonic, California. The Masonic Square and Compasses. (Found with or without the letter G) …

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  • 119Knight — Knighthood redirects here. For modern British honours, see Orders, decorations, and medals of the United Kingdom. For other nations, see State decoration. For other uses, see knight (disambiguation) and knights (disambiguation). Royal and noble&#8230; …

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  • 120Plautus — For the Roman noble, see Rubellius Plautus. Plautus Born c. 254 BC Sarsina, Umbria Died 184 BC Rome …

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