hurl

  • 21hurl — [[t]hɜ͟ː(r)l[/t]] hurls, hurling, hurled 1) VERB If you hurl something, you throw it violently and with a lot of force. [V n prep] Groups of angry youths hurled stones at police... [V n prep] One prisoner set fire to rags and hurled them into the …

    English dictionary

  • 22hurl — [[t]hɜrl[/t]] v.t. 1) to throw or fling with great force or vigor; cast 2) to throw or cast down 3) to utter with vehemence: to hurl insults at the umpire[/ex] 4) to throw a missile 5) a forcible or violent throw; fling • Etymology: 1175–1225;… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 23hurl — 1. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (Like the throw in throw up.) □ I think I gotta go hurl. 2. n. vomit. □ There’s hurl all over the bathroom floor! …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • 24hurl — verb (hurled; hurling) Etymology: Middle English Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. rush, hurtle 2. pitch 5a, b 3. vomit transitive verb 1. to send or thrust with great vigo …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 25hurl — hurler, n. /herrl/, v.t. 1. to throw or fling with great force or vigor. 2. to throw or cast down. 3. to utter with vehemence: to hurl insults at the umpire. v.i. 4. to throw a missile. 5. Baseball. to pitch a ball. n. 6. a forcible or violent… …

    Universalium

  • 26hurl — verb a) To throw (something) with force. I was standing on the edge of the conning tower, when a heavy palm suddenly struck me between the shoulders and hurled me forward into space. The drop to the triangular deck forward of the conning tower… …

    Wiktionary

  • 27Hurl — Recorded in many forms including Earl, Hurl, Harle, Hearle, Earle, Earles, Hurles and no doubt others, this is a surname of English pre 7th century origins. In its earliest form it indicated a freeman who was also a chief, and probably a… …

    Surnames reference

  • 28hurl — verb Hurl is used with these nouns as the object: ↑abuse, ↑accusation, ↑brick, ↑grenade, ↑insult, ↑missile, ↑spear, ↑stone …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 29hurl — I Australian Slang (adj, n.) vomit II Scottish Vernacular Dictionary Lift, ride. I got a hurl on the back of the ginger lorry …

    English dialects glossary

  • 30hurl — 01. The young boy [hurled] his eraser across the room and hit his friend in the head. 02. The old woman [hurled] abuse at the teenagers who had run though her garden stealing strawberries. 03. The monster began picking up cars and [hurling] them… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 31hurl — verb 1) he hurled an eraser at her head Syn: throw, toss, fling, pitch, cast, lob, bowl, launch, catapult; project, propel, let fly, fire; informal chuck, heave, sling, peg; dated shy 2) informal …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 32hurl —   Nou, kūpahu, kā.   Also: walakīkē; ō ō, pahu (as a spear); kā alā (as stones with a sling);    ♦ hurl down, kiola ino. See throw …

    English-Hawaiian dictionary

  • 33HURL — Hawaii Underwater Research Laboratory (Academic & Science » Ocean Science) …

    Abbreviations dictionary

  • 34Hurl — (adj., n.) vomit …

    Dictionary of Australian slang

  • 35hurl — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. throw, project, pitch, toss, fling, cast, dart. See propulsion. II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. throw, cast, fling, heave; see throw 1 . See Synonym Study at throw . III (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) v. throw …

    English dictionary for students

  • 36hurl — vb to vomit. A usage common in Australia and, to a lesser extent, in Britain …

    Contemporary slang

  • 37hurl — v. a. pret. ‘harlede.’ RG. 487, 537 …

    Oldest English Words

  • 38hurl — hÉœrl /hɜːl v. throw, cast, toss …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 39hurl — vomit, puke, barf, hork, woof your cookies    After eating two raw eggs, she hurled all over my sheepskin! …

    English idioms

  • 40hurl — verb throw or impel with great force. ↘utter (abuse) vehemently. noun Scottish informal a ride in a vehicle. Origin ME: prob. imitative, but corresp. in form and partly in sense with Low Ger. hurreln …

    English new terms dictionary