for+each

  • 21For You, For Me Tour — Tour by Kylie Minogue Start date September 30, 2009 End date …

    Wikipedia

  • 22for — [ weak fər, strong fɔr ] function word *** For can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): I bought some flowers for Chloe. Wait there for a while. as a conjunction (connecting two clauses): I told her to leave, for… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 23For the Beauty of the Earth — is a Christian hymn by Folliott S. Pierpoint (1835 1917).Pierpoint was 29 at the time he wrote this hymn; he was mesmerised by the beauty of the countryside that surrounded him. It first appeared in 1864 in a book of poems entitled The Sacrifice… …

    Wikipedia

  • 24for every — for every/each/ phrase used for talking about the relationship between one number or amount and another For every person who complains, there are always hundreds of satisfied customers. For each basket of apples you pick, you get £2. Thesaurus:… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 25For loop — In computer science a for loop is a programming language statement which allows code to be repeatedly executed. A for loop is classified as an iteration statement.Unlike many other kinds of loops, such as the while loop, the for loop is often… …

    Wikipedia

  • 26each — 1 /i:tS/ determiner, pronoun 1 every single one or two or more things or people considered separately: Jane had a blister on each foot. | There are four bedrooms, each with its own shower. | The price is $60 for a week, then $10 for each extra… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 27for — 1 strong,; strong /fO:r/ preposition 1 intended to be given to or belong to a particular person: I ve got a present for you. | Save some for Arthur. 2 intended to be used in a particular situation: We ve bought some new chairs for the office. | a …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 28each — [[t]i͟ːtʃ[/t]] ♦ 1) DET: DET sing n If you refer to each thing or each person in a group, you are referring to every member of the group and considering them as individuals. Each book is beautifully illustrated... Each year, hundreds of animals… …

    English dictionary

  • 29each — /eech/, adj. 1. every one of two or more considered individually or one by one: each stone in a building; a hallway with a door at each end. pron. 2. every one individually; each one: Each had a different solution to the problem. adv. 3. to, from …

    Universalium

  • 30each — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adv. apiece, severally, seriatim, respectively. See speciality. adj. every. See generality. II (Roget s IV) modif. 1. [Every] Syn. all, any, one by one, separate, particular, specific, private, several,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 31for — for1 W1S1 [fə strong fo: $ fər strong fo:r] prep [: Old English;] 1.) used to say who is intended to get or use something, or where something is intended to be used ▪ I ve got a present for you. ▪ Someone left a message for Vicky. ▪ an English… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 32for */*/*/ — strong UK [fɔː(r)] / US [fɔr] weak UK [fə(r)] / US [fər] preposition, conjunction Summary: For can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): I bought some flowers for Chloe. ♦ Wait there for a while. as a conjunction… …

    English dictionary

  • 33each — [[t]itʃ[/t]] adj. 1) every one of two or more considered individually or one by one: each stone in a wall; a door at each end[/ex] 2) fun every one individually; each one: Each had a different solution to the problem[/ex] 3) to, from, or for… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 34For the Rest of Your Life — Infobox British television show name = For the Rest of Your Life size = caption = format = Game show runtime = 60 minutes (inc. advertisements) creator = Endemol presenter = Nicky Campbell country = UK channel = ITV first aired = 8 May 2007 last… …

    Wikipedia

  • 35For my part — Part Part (p[aum]rt), n. [F. part, L. pars, gen. partis; cf. parere to bring forth, produce. Cf. {Parent}, {Depart}, {Parcel}, {Partner}, {Party}, {Portion}.] 1. One of the portions, equal or unequal, into which anything is divided, or regarded… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 36For the most part — Part Part (p[aum]rt), n. [F. part, L. pars, gen. partis; cf. parere to bring forth, produce. Cf. {Parent}, {Depart}, {Parcel}, {Partner}, {Party}, {Portion}.] 1. One of the portions, equal or unequal, into which anything is divided, or regarded… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 37each — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English ech, from Old English ǣlc; akin to Old High German iogilīh each; both from West Germanic *aiw ever, always (whence Old English ā always) + *galīkaz having the same form, like (whence Old English gelīc like)… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 38each and every —    is at best a trite way of providing emphasis, at worst redundant, and generally both, as here: Each and every one of the twelve songs on Marshall Crenshaw s debut album is breezy and refreshing (Washington Post). Equally to be avoided is each… …

    Dictionary of troublesome word

  • 39each — [ itʃ ] function word, quantifier *** Each can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by a singular countable noun): in each corner of the room as a pronoun: three windows, with a different view from each (followed by of ): I… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 40each — 1. singular or plural. Each is treated as singular when it stands by itself as a pronoun, when it comes before a singular noun (each house), and when it is followed by of and a plural noun (each of the houses): • Each group is responsible for its …

    Modern English usage