exculpation

  • 21 acquittal — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Exoneration Nouns acquittal, quittance, exculpation, absolution, exoneration, clearing, vindication; discharge, release, dismissal, grace, quietus, reprieve, respite, absolution, remission; amnesty,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 22 Duty of care (business associations) — Companies law Company  …

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  • 23 vindication — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Clearing from an accusation Nouns 1. vindication, justification, warrant; exoneration, exculpation; acquittal; whitewashing; extenuation; palliation, softening, mitigation. See justice. 2. reply, defense …

    English dictionary for students

  • 24 Diminished responsibility — For other types of responsibility, see Responsibility (disambiguation). Criminal defenses …

    Wikipedia

  • 25 Justifiable homicide — The United States concept of justifiable homicide in criminal law stands on the dividing line between an excuse, justification and an exculpation. In other words, it takes a case that would otherwise have been a murder or another crime… …

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  • 26 Exkulpation — Unter der Exkulpation (von lat. culpa, „Schuld“) wird in der Rechtswissenschaft die Schuldbefreiung einer Person verstanden. Schuldrecht Im Schuldrecht wird die Exkulpation benutzt, um vermutetes Verschulden zu widerlegen. Dies betrifft im… …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 27 discharge — dis·charge 1 /dis chärj, dis ˌchärj/ vt 1: to release from an obligation: as a: to relieve of a duty under an instrument (as a contract or a negotiable instrument); also: to render (an instrument) no longer enforceable a formal instrument...may… …

    Law dictionary

  • 28 Operation North — For other uses, see Operation North (disambiguation). Operation North (Russian: Операция Север ) was the code name assigned by the USSR Ministry of State Security[1] to massive deportation of the members of the Jehovah s Witnesses[2] and their… …

    Wikipedia

  • 29 forgiveness — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Granting of pardon Nouns forgiveness, pardon, condonation, grace, remission, absolution, amnesty, oblivion; indulgence; reprieve; excuse, exoneration, exculpation (see acquittal); conciliation,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 30 exoneration — I (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Vindication] Syn. absolution, exculpation, acquittal; see acquittal , pardon 1 . 2. [Liberation] Syn. exemption, release, reprieve; see freeing . II (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun A freeing or clearing from accusation or guilt …

    English dictionary for students

  • 31 Exemption — I (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Exemption >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 exemption exemption Sgm: N 1 absence absence &c. 187 Sgm: N 1 exception exception immunity privilege release PARAG:Exemption >V GRP: V 1 …

    English dictionary for students

  • 32 Forgiveness — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Forgiveness >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 forgiveness forgiveness pardon condonation grace remission absolution amnesty oblivion Sgm: N 1 indulgence indulgence Sgm: N 1 reprieve reprieve …

    English dictionary for students

  • 33 Compurgation — Com pur*ga tion, n. [L. compurgatio, fr. compurgare to purify wholly; com + purgare to make pure. See Purge, v. t.] 1. (Law) The act or practice of justifying or confirming a man s veracity by the oath of others; called also {wager of law}. See… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 34 Disculpation — Dis cul*pa tion, n. [Cf. F. disculpation.] Exculpation. Burke. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 35 Exculpable — Ex*cul pa*ble Capable of being exculpated; deserving exculpation. Sir G. Buck. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 36 wager of law — Compurgation Com pur*ga tion, n. [L. compurgatio, fr. compurgare to purify wholly; com + purgare to make pure. See Purge, v. t.] 1. (Law) The act or practice of justifying or confirming a man s veracity by the oath of others; called also {wager… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 37 exculpate — transitive verb ( pated; pating) Etymology: Medieval Latin exculpatus, past participle of exculpare, from Latin ex + culpa blame Date: circa 1681 to clear from alleged fault or guilt • exculpation noun Synonyms: exculpate, absolve, exonerate,… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 38 Christianity and antisemitism — Antisemitism Part of Jewish history …

    Wikipedia

  • 39 Homosexuality and Judaism — The subject of homosexuality in Judaism dates back to the Biblical book of Leviticus. This describes sexual intercourse between males as an abomination that may be subject to capital punishment, although Halakhic courts are not authorized to… …

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  • 40 Free will — This article is about the philosophical questions of free will. For other uses, see Free will (disambiguation). A domino s movement is determined completely by laws of physics. Incompatibilists say that this is a threat to free will, but… …

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