entitle

  • 81name — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. nomen (see nomenclature); reputation, fame, repute. v. t. [en]title, call, designate, christen; appoint, nominate; style; mention, specify. See commission. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [A title] Syn. proper… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 82qualify — I (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To limit] Syn. reduce, restrain, temper; see change 1 , restrict 2 . 2. [To fulfill requirements] Syn. fit, suit, pass, be eligible, be equipped, be capacitated, have the requisites, meet the demands, measure up, meet the… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 83Dueness — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Dueness >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 due due dueness Sgm: N 1 right right privilege prerogative prescription title claim pretension demand birthright GRP: N 2 …

    English dictionary for students

  • 84title — [13] Title comes via Old French title from Latin titulus ‘inscription on a tomb or altar, label, title’. Other contributions made by the Latin word to English include entitle [14], tilde [19], tittle [14], and titular [18]. => ENTITLE, TILDE,… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 85entitlement — 1823, perhaps in some senses from Fr. entitlement, which long had been used in legal language; in part a native formation from ENTITLE (Cf. entitle) + MENT (Cf. ment). Entitlement culture attested by 1994 (culture of entitlement is from 1989) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 86intitule — in•tit•ule [[t]ɪnˈtɪt yul[/t]] v. t. uled, ul•ing. brit. to entitle (a legislative act, etc.) • Etymology: 1480–90; < LL intitulāre; see entitle in•tit u•la′tion, n …

    From formal English to slang

  • 87προτιτλωσάντων — προτιτλόω entitle aor part act masc/neut gen pl προτιτλόω entitle aor imperat act 3rd pl …

    Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • 88right — As a noun, and taken in an abstract sense, means justice, ethical correctness, or consonance with the rules of law or the principles of morals. In this signification it answers to one meaning of the Latin jus, and serves to indicate law in the… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 89numbers game — A form of lottery. 34 Am J1st Lot § 7. A lottery, conducted under a system devised with more or less ingenuity to disguise the character of the enterprise. A lottery scheme wherein the proprietor sells for a specific sum, usually a few cents,… …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 90title — [13] Title comes via Old French title from Latin titulus ‘inscription on a tomb or altar, label, title’. Other contributions made by the Latin word to English include entitle [14], tilde [19], tittle [14], and titular [18]. Cf.⇒ ENTITLE, TILDE,… …

    Word origins

  • 91intitule — [in tit′yo͞ol΄] vt. intituled, intituling [ME intitulen < OFr intituler < LL intitulare, to ENTITLE] Chiefly Brit. to entitle (a legislative act, etc.) …

    English World dictionary

  • 92in|ti|tle — «ihn TY tuhl», transitive verb, tled, tling. = entitle. (Cf. ↑entitle) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 93Authenticate — Au*then ti*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Authenticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Authenticating} (?).] [Cf. LL. authenticare.] 1. To render authentic; to give authority to, by the proof, attestation, or formalities required by law, or sufficient to entitle …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 94Authenticated — Authenticate Au*then ti*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Authenticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Authenticating} (?).] [Cf. LL. authenticare.] 1. To render authentic; to give authority to, by the proof, attestation, or formalities required by law, or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 95Authenticating — Authenticate Au*then ti*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Authenticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Authenticating} (?).] [Cf. LL. authenticare.] 1. To render authentic; to give authority to, by the proof, attestation, or formalities required by law, or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 96Betitle — Be*ti tle, v. t. To furnish with a title or titles; to entitle. [Obs.] Carlyle. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 97Characterize — Char ac*ter*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Characterized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Characterizing}.] [LL. characterizare, Gr. ?: cf. F. charact[ e]riser.] 1. To make distinct and recognizable by peculiar marks or traits; to make with distinctive features.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 98Characterized — Characterize Char ac*ter*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Characterized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Characterizing}.] [LL. characterizare, Gr. ?: cf. F. charact[ e]riser.] 1. To make distinct and recognizable by peculiar marks or traits; to make with distinctive …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 99Characterizing — Characterize Char ac*ter*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Characterized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Characterizing}.] [LL. characterizare, Gr. ?: cf. F. charact[ e]riser.] 1. To make distinct and recognizable by peculiar marks or traits; to make with distinctive …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 100Coup — (k[=oo]), n. [F., fr.L. colaphus a cuff, Gr. ko lafos.] 1. A sudden stroke delivered with promptness and force; used also in various ways to convey the idea of an unexpected, clever, and successful tactic or stratagem. [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. A… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English