dictum

  • 21dictum —    (DIK tum) [Latin] A formal pronouncement; an authoritative statement or assertion. A maxim or saying.    See also obiter dictum.    adding that the same dictum holds for young actors Time, April 12, 1999 …

    Dictionary of foreign words and phrases

  • 22dictum — noun 1) he received the dictum with evident reluctance Syn: pronouncement, proclamation, direction, injunction, dictate, command, commandment, order, decree, edict, mandate, diktat 2) the old dictum might is right Syn …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 23dictum — UK [ˈdɪktəm] / US noun [countable] Word forms dictum : singular dictum plural dictums or dicta UK [ˈdɪktə] / US an expression or statement that people often repeat because it says something interesting or wise about a subject …

    English dictionary

  • 24dictum — {{#}}{{LM D46225}}{{〓}} {{[}}dictum{{]}} {{■}}(lat.){{□}} {{《}}▍ s.m.{{》}} Sentencia o frase breve que expresan una enseñanza o una advertencia: • Según el dictum aristotélico, ‘libertad es elegir’.{{○}} {{★}}{{\}}PRONUNCIACIÓN:{{/}} [díktum].… …

    Diccionario de uso del español actual con sinónimos y antónimos

  • 25dictum — An expression in an opinion which is not necessary to support the decision reached by the court. Parker v Stonehouse Drainage Dist: 152 Kan 188, 102 P 1017. A statement in an opinion with respect to a matter which is not an issue necessary for… …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 26DICTUM — s. m. (On prononce Dictome. ) Mot emprunté du latin. Dispositif d un jugement, d un arrêt ; cette partie d un jugement, d un arrêt qui contient ce que le juge prononce et ordonne. Le dictum d une sentence, d un arrêt …

    Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • 27dictum — /dik teuhm/, n., pl. dicta / teuh/, dictums. 1. an authoritative pronouncement; judicial assertion. 2. a saying; maxim. 3. See obiter dictum. [1660 70; < L: something said, a saying, command, word, n. use of neut. ptp. of dicere to say, speak; cf …

    Universalium

  • 28dictum — noun /ˈdɪk.təm/ a) An authoritative statement; a dogmatic saying; a maxim, an apothegm. ...a dictum which he had heard an economics professor once propound... b) A judicial opinion expressed by judges on points that do no …

    Wiktionary

  • 29dictum — dic|tum [ˈdıktəm] n plural dictums or dicta [ tə] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: thing said , from the past participle of dicere to say ] 1.) a formal statement of opinion by someone who is respected or has authority 2.) a short phrase that&#8230; …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 30dictum — obiter dictum …

    Glossary of international commercial arbitration

  • 31dictum — [ dɪktəm] noun (plural dicta tə or dictums) a formal pronouncement from an authoritative source. ↘a short statement that expresses a general truth or principle. ↘Law short for obiter dictum. Origin C16: from L., lit. something said , neut. past&#8230; …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 32dictum — noun plural dicta, or dictums (C) 1 a formal statement of opinion by someone who is respected or has authority 2 a short phrase that expresses a general rule or truth: He followed the age old dictum of age before beauty …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 33Dictum — ♦ A judicial opinion on a point other than the precise issue in a case before the court; sometimes obiter dictum, an opinion stated by the way. (Hogue, Arthur R. Origins of the Common Law, 255) …

    Medieval glossary

  • 34dictum — dic•tum [[t]ˈdɪk təm[/t]] n. pl. ta( tə), tums. 1) an authoritative pronouncement; judicial assertion 2) a saying; maxim 3) obiter dictum • Etymology: 1660–70; &LT; L: a saying, command, word; cf. index …

    From formal English to slang

  • 35dictum — /ˈdɪktəm / (say diktuhm) noun (plural dicta /ˈdɪktə/ (say diktuh) or dictums) 1. an authoritative pronouncement; judicial assertion. 2. a saying; maxim. 3. → obiter dictum. {Latin: something said, a saying, a command, properly past participle&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 36dictum — n. (pl. dicta or dictums) 1 a formal utterance or pronouncement. 2 a saying or maxim. 3 Law = OBITER DICTUM. Etymology: L, = neut. past part. of dicere say …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 37dictum — noun (plural dicta; also dictums) Etymology: Latin, from neuter of dictus, past participle of dicere Date: 1599 1. a noteworthy statement: as a. a formal pronouncement of a principle, proposition, or opinion …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 38Dictum — Dịc|tum 〈n.; s, Dịc|ta〉 = Diktum …

    Universal-Lexikon

  • 39dictum — Synonyms and related words: Parthian shot, a priori truth, action, adage, address, affirmance, affirmation, allegation, ana, analects, announcement, annunciation, answer, aphorism, apostrophe, apothegm, appointment, assertion, asseveration,&#8230; …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 40dictum — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) (pl. dicta) n. saying, maxim; decision, judgment; pronouncement. See affirmation. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Pronouncement] Syn. dictate, assertion, decree; see announcement 2 , declaration 1 , 2 , judgment&#8230; …

    English dictionary for students