delicate

  • 21delicate — adjective 1 EASILY DAMAGED easily damaged or broken; fragile (1): a delicate bubble of Venetian glass 2 NEEDING SENSITIVITY needing to be dealt with carefully or sensitively in order to avoid problems or failure: The negotiations are at a… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 22délicate — ● délicat, délicate adjectif (latin delicatus, choisi, de deliciae, délices) D une finesse propre à satisfaire quelqu un dont le goût est exigeant, raffiné, recherché, sensible aux nuances : Des mets délicats. Qui est exécuté avec une grande… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 23delicate — adjective 1) delicate embroidery Syn: fine, exquisite, intricate, dainty; flimsy, gauzy, filmy, floaty, diaphanous, wispy, insubstantial Ant: coarse, crude 2) …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 24delicate — adj. VERBS ▪ be, feel, look ▪ Her bones felt as delicate as a bird s. ▪ The glasses looked very delicate. ▪ become AD …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 25delicate — adjective 1) delicate embroidery Syn: fine, intricate, dainty 2) a delicate shade of blue Syn: subtle, soft, muted, pastel, pale, light 3) delicate china cu …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 26delicate — [ˈdelɪkət] adj 1) easily damaged, broken, or hurt Delicate skin must be protected from the sun.[/ex] delicate fabrics[/ex] 2) small and attractive delicate pink flowers[/ex] 3) needing care and skill The negotiations are at a very delicate… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 27delicate — 1. adjective a) Easily damaged or requiring careful handling. Those clothes are delicate b) Characterized by a fine structure or thin lines. The negotiations were very delicate See Also: delicacy …

    Wiktionary

  • 28delicate — adj. 1 a fine in texture or structure; soft, slender, or slight. b of exquisite quality or workmanship. c (of colour) subtle or subdued; not bright. d subtle, hard to appreciate. 2 (of a person) easily injured; susceptible to illness. 3 a… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 29delicate —    obsolete    suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis    One of the 19th century euphemisms for the common disease:     The brother died young. He was delicate. (Flanagan, 1988, writing in 19th century style)    Today a delicate condition… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 30delicate — adjective 1》 very fine in texture or structure; of intricate workmanship or quality.     ↘(of food or drink) subtly and pleasantly flavoured. 2》 easily broken or damaged; fragile.     ↘susceptible to illness or adverse conditions. 3》 requiring… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 31delicate — /ˈdɛləkət / (say deluhkuht) adjective 1. fine in texture, quality, construction, etc. 2. dainty or choice, as food. 3. soft or faint, as colour. 4. so fine or slight as to be scarcely perceptible; subtle. 5. easily damaged; fragile. 6. requiring… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 32delicate — I (Roget s IV) modif. 1. [Dainty] Syn. fragile, frail, fine; see dainty 1 . See Synonym Study at dainty . 2. [Sickly] Syn. susceptible, in delicate health, feeble; see sick , weak 1 . 3. [Needing careful handling] Syn. touchy, ticklish, sensitive …

    English dictionary for students

  • 33delicate — [14] Delicate comes either from Old French delicat or direct from its source, Latin dēlicātus, but its ultimate history is obscure. Its formal similarity to delicious and delight, and the fact that ‘addicted to pleasure’ was one of the meanings… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 34delicate — [14] Delicate comes either from Old French delicat or direct from its source, Latin dēlicātus, but its ultimate history is obscure. Its formal similarity to delicious and delight, and the fact that ‘addicted to pleasure’ was one of the meanings… …

    Word origins

  • 35delicate — Of feeble resisting power. [L. delicatus, soft, luxurious, fr. de, from, + lacio, to entice] …

    Medical dictionary

  • 36Delicate — There are two sources for this English name, the first being a locational name from any of the numerous places in England e.g., Coates in Cambridgeshire and Cotes in Leicestershire. A locational name was usually given to the lord of the manor at… …

    Surnames reference

  • 37delicate — Synonyms and related words: Herculean, Victorian, abstruse, accommodating, accommodative, accurate, adept, aerial, agreeable, airy, allergic, ambrosial, anaphylactic, appreciative, arduous, attentive, attenuate, attenuated, balmy, becoming,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 38delicate — del·icate || delɪkÉ™t adj. fragile, easily broken; sensitive …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 39delicate — a. 1. Pleasant, pleasing, delicious, agreeable, savory, palatable. 2. Fine, nice, elegant, exquisite. 3. Slight, slender, weak, frail, tender, sensitive. 4. Discriminating, careful, scrupulous, fastidious, dainty, of nice perception. 5. Refined,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 40delicate — adj 1. dainty, fine, sheer, transparent, translucent; smooth, silken, soft, thin, gauzy, gossamer; elegant, exquisite, choice, tender. 2. fragile, frail, perishable; slender, slight, attenuated, small; feeble, weak, ailing, unwell, infirm, sickly …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder