cuirass

  • 161 Conrad of Montferrat — (or Conrad I of Jerusalem) (Italian: Corrado di Monferrato; Piedmontese: Conrà ëd Monfrà) (mid 1140s – 28 April 1192) was a northern Italian nobleman, one of the major participants in the Third Crusade. He was the de facto King of Jerusalem, by… …

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  • 162 Urnfield culture — The Urnfield culture (c. 1300 BC 750 BC) was a late Bronze Age culture of central Europe. The name comes from the custom of cremating the dead and placing their ashes in urns which were then buried in fields. The Urnfield culture followed the… …

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  • 163 Tracheotomy — This article is about the surgical procedure called a tracheotomy. For a similar procedure, see Cricothyrotomy. Tracheotomy Intervention Completed tracheotomy: 1 Vocal folds 2 Thyroid cartilage 3 Cricoid cartilage 4 Tracheal rings …

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  • 164 Frederick Schomberg, 1st Duke of Schomberg — Friedrich Hermann (or Frédéric Armand), 1st Duke of Schomberg (originally Schönberg) (December 1615 or January 1616 mdash;July 11, 1690), was both a marshal of France and a General in the English Army.Descended from an old family of the… …

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  • 165 Pope John XII — Infobox Pope English name=John XII birth name=Ottaviano term start=December 16, 955 term end=May 14, 964 predecessor=Agapetus II successor=Leo VIII birth date=c. 937 birthplace=Rome, Italy dead=dead|death date=death date|964|5|14|mf=y… …

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  • 166 Burford — Infobox UK place official name= Burford country= England region= South East England population= 5,972 os grid reference= SP2512 london distance= latitude= 51.8077 longitude= 1.6367 post town= postcode area= postcode district= dial code=… …

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  • 167 Imperial Guard (Napoleon I) — This article discusses the group of soldiers who acted as Napoleon Bonaparte s personal guard. For other uses of the term, see Imperial Guard (disambiguation) Grognard of the Old Guard in 1813 The Imperial Guard (French: Garde Impériale) was… …

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  • 168 Plate armour — is personal armour made from large metal plates, worn on the chest and sometimes the entire body. History Plate armour protecting the chest and the lower limbs was used by the ancient Greeks and Romans, but it fell into disuse after the collapse… …

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  • 169 Mycenaean Greece — History of Greece This article is part of a series …

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  • 170 Byeonhan confederacy — Byeonhan, also known as Byeonjin, was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the beginning of the Common Era to the 4th century in the southern Korean peninsula. Byeonhan was one of the Samhan (or Three Hans ), along with Mahan …

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  • 171 Lamellar armour — is a kind of personal armour consisting of small plates ( lames ) which are laced together in parallel rows. Lamellar armour evolved from scale armourFact|date=May 2007, from which it differs by not needing a backing for the scales. It is made… …

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  • 172 Roman Republican coinage — Coinage came late to the Roman Republic compared with the rest of the Mediterranean, especially Greece and Asia Minor where coins were invented in the 7th century BC. The currency of central Italy was influenced by its natural resources, with… …

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  • 173 Cervelliere — c. 1240/1250. The cervelliere is a round, close fitting steel skull cap. It was worn as a helmet during the medieval period. History It was first introduced during the late 12th and was the primary head protection for Crusaders at that time and… …

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  • 174 Ondine's curse — Classification and external resources ICD 10 G47.3 ICD 9 348.8 …

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  • 175 Mon (crest) — nihongo|Mon|紋|( plural mon), also nihongo|monshō|紋章|, nihongo|mondokoro|紋所|, and nihongo|kamon|家紋|, are Japanese heraldic symbols. Mon may refer to any symbol, while kamon and mondokoro refer specifically to family symbols. Mon serve roughly… …

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  • 176 Peltast — A peltast (Ancient Greek: πελταστής) was a type of light infantry in Ancient Greece who often served as skirmishers. DescriptionPeltasts carried a crescent shaped wicker shield called pelte (Latin: peltarion) as their main protection, hence their …

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  • 177 Companion cavalry — For similarly spelled words, see Hetair (disambiguation). Alexander Mosaic, showing the Battle of Issus, from the House of the Faun, Pompeii The Companions (Greek: ἑταῖροι, hetairoi) were the elite cavalry o …

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  • 178 Colossus of Barletta — The Colossus of Barletta. The Colossus of Barletta is a large bronze statue of an Eastern Roman Emperor, nearly three times life size (5.11 meters, or about 16 feet 7 inches) and currently located in Barletta, Italy. The statue reportedly washed… …

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  • 179 Carabinier — For the device used to connect ropes, see carabiner A Carabinier (also sometimes spelled Carabineer or Carbineer) ( Carabinero in Spanish, Carabiniere in Italian) was originally a cavalry soldier armed with a carbine (a short version of a musket) …

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  • 180 Ancient warfare — is war as conducted from the beginnings of recorded history to the end of the ancient period. In Europe and the Near East, the end of antiquity is often equated with the fall of Rome in 476. In China, it can also be seen as ending in the 5th… …

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