contumely

  • 41contumacious — (adj.) c.1600, from L. contumaci , stem of contumax haughty, insolent, obstinate (see CONTUMELY (Cf. contumely)) + OUS (Cf. ous) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 42contumacy — (n.) late 14c., from L. contumacia haughtiness, insolence, noun of quality from contumax (see CONTUMELY (Cf. contumely)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 43contumelious — late 15c., from O.Fr. contumelieus, from L. contumeliosus reproachful, insolently abusive, from contumelia (see CONTUMELY (Cf. contumely)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 44προυσελοῦμεν — προυσελέω treat with contumely pres ind act 1st pl (attic epic doric) προυσελέω treat with contumely imperf ind act 1st pl (attic epic doric) …

    Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • 45προυσελούμενον — προυσελέω treat with contumely pres part mp masc acc sg (attic epic doric) προυσελέω treat with contumely pres part mp neut nom/voc/acc sg (attic epic doric) …

    Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • 46tumour — [16] Tumour is one of a small family of English words that go back ultimately to Latin tumēre ‘swell’. Others include contumacy, contumely, tumid ‘swollen’ [16], and tumult [15]. Cf.⇒ CONTUMACY, CONTUMELY, THIGH, THUMB, TUMID, TUMULT …

    Word origins

  • 47revilement — noun a rude expression intended to offend or hurt when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse they yelled insults at the visiting team • Syn: ↑abuse, ↑insult, ↑contumely, ↑vilification • Derivationally related forms: ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 48vilification — noun 1. a rude expression intended to offend or hurt when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse they yelled insults at the visiting team • Syn: ↑abuse, ↑insult, ↑revilement, ↑contumely • Derivationally related forms: ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 49con|tu|me|ly — «KON tu muh lee, tyu ; MEE ; kuhn TOO , TYOO », noun, plural lies. 1. insulting words or actions; humiliating treatment; insolent contempt: »The nobles treated the peasants with contumely. These people are willing to face the contempt of the… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 50Abuse — A*buse , n. [F. abus, L. abusus, fr. abuti. See {Abuse}, v. t.] 1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an abuse of …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 51Abuse of distress — Abuse A*buse , n. [F. abus, L. abusus, fr. abuti. See {Abuse}, v. t.] 1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 52Contek — Con tek (k[o^]n t[e^]k), n. [OE. conteck, conteke, contake, perh. a corruption either of contact or contest.] 1. Quarrel; contention; contest. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Contek with bloody knife. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. Contumely; reproach. [Obs.]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 53Contempt — Con*tempt (k[o^]n*t[e^]mt ; 215), n. [L. contemptus, fr. contemnere: cf. OF. contempt. See {Contemn}.] 1. The act of contemning or despising; the feeling with which one regards that which is esteemed mean, vile, or worthless; disdain; scorn.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 54Contumelious — Con tu*me li*ous (?or ?; 106), a. [L. contumeliosus.] 1. Exhibiting contumely; rudely contemptuous; insolent; disdainful. [1913 Webster] Scoffs, and scorns, and contumelious taunts. Shak. [1913 Webster] Curving a contumelious lip. Tennyson. [1913 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 55Contumeliously — Contumelious Con tu*me li*ous (?or ?; 106), a. [L. contumeliosus.] 1. Exhibiting contumely; rudely contemptuous; insolent; disdainful. [1913 Webster] Scoffs, and scorns, and contumelious taunts. Shak. [1913 Webster] Curving a contumelious lip.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 56Contumeliousness — Contumelious Con tu*me li*ous (?or ?; 106), a. [L. contumeliosus.] 1. Exhibiting contumely; rudely contemptuous; insolent; disdainful. [1913 Webster] Scoffs, and scorns, and contumelious taunts. Shak. [1913 Webster] Curving a contumelious lip.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 57Indignities — Indignity In*dig ni*ty, n.; pl. {Indignities}. [L. indignitas: cf. F. indignit[ e]. See {Indign}.] Any action toward another which manifests contempt for him; an offense against personal dignity; unmerited contemptuous treatment; contumely;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 58Indignity — In*dig ni*ty, n.; pl. {Indignities}. [L. indignitas: cf. F. indignit[ e]. See {Indign}.] Any action toward another which manifests contempt for him; an offense against personal dignity; unmerited contemptuous treatment; contumely; incivility or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 59Insult — In sult, n. [L. insultus, fr. insilire to leap upon: cf. F. insulte. See {Insult}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of leaping on; onset; attack. [Obs.] Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. Gross abuse offered to another, either by word or act; an act or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 60Obloquy — Ob lo*quy ([o^]b l[ o]*kw[y^]), n. [L. obloquium, fr. obloqui. See {Oblocutor}.] 1. Censorious speech; defamatory language; language that casts contempt on men or their actions; blame; reprehension. [1913 Webster] Shall names that made your city… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English