contiguity

  • 21contiguity — con•ti•gu•i•ty [[t]ˌkɒn tɪˈgyu ɪ ti[/t]] n. pl. ties the state of being contiguous; contact or proximity • Etymology: 1635–45; < LL …

    From formal English to slang

  • 22contiguity — /kɒntəˈgjuəti/ (say kontuh gyoohuhtee) noun (plural contiguities) the state of being contiguous …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 23contiguity — n. 1 being contiguous; proximity; contact. 2 Psychol. the proximity of ideas or impressions in place or time, as a principle of association …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 24Contiguity (probability theory) — In probability theory, two sequences of probability measures are said to be contiguous if asymptotically they share the same support. Thus the notion of contiguity extends the concept of absolute continuity to the sequences of measures. The… …

    Wikipedia

  • 25contiguity, theory of — ▪ psychology       psychological theory of learning which emphasizes that the only condition necessary for the association of stimuli and responses is that there be a close temporal relationship between them. It holds that learning will occur… …

    Universalium

  • 26contiguity, law of — In Leibniz, the principle that there are no discontinuous changes in nature: ‘ natura non facit saltum’, nature makes no leaps. Leibniz was able to use the principle to criticize the mechanical system of Descartes, which would imply such leaps in …

    Philosophy dictionary

  • 27amputation in contiguity — an amputation at a joint …

    Medical dictionary

  • 28Association of Ideas — Association of Ideas, or Mental association, is a term used principally in the history of philosophy and of psychology to refer to explanations about the conditions under which representations arise in consciousness, and also for a principle put… …

    Wikipedia

  • 29Fuzzy locating system — Fuzzy locating is a rough but reliable method based on appropriate measuring technology for estimating a location of an object. The concept of precise or ‘’crisp locating’’ is replaced with respect to the operational requirements and the economic …

    Wikipedia

  • 30epistemology — epistemological /i pis teuh meuh loj i keuhl/, adj. epistemologically, adv. epistemologist, n. /i pis teuh mol euh jee/, n. a branch of philosophy that investigates the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowledge. [1855 60; < Gk&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 31Association of Ideas — • A principle in psychology to account for the succession of mental states Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Association of Ideas     Association of Ideas      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 32Onomasiology — (from Greek: ὀνομάζω (onomāzο) to name, which in turn is from ὀνομα name) is a branch of linguistics concerned with the question how do you express X? It is in fact most commonly understood as a branch of lexicology, the study of words (although&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 33Semantic change — Semantic change, also known as semantic shift or semantic progression describes the evolution of word usage usually to the point that the modern meaning is radically different from the original usage. In diachronic (or historical) linguistics,&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 34Personal identity (philosophy) — In philosophy, personal identity refers to the essence of a self conscious person, that which makes him or her unique. It persists making the person modifications happen through one single identity.DescriptionThe question regarding personal&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 35Cognitive load — The term cognitive load is used in cognitive psychology to illustrate the load related to the executive control of working memory (WM). Theories contend that during complex learning activities the amount of information and interactions that must&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 36Memory and aging — One of the key concerns of older adults is the experience of memory loss, especially as it is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer s disease. However, memory loss is qualitatively different in normal aging from the kind of memory loss&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 37Multimedia learning — is the common name used to describe the cognitive theory of multimedia learning[1][2][3] This theory encompasses several principles of learning with multimedia. Contents 1 …

    Wikipedia

  • 38thought — thought1 /thawt/, n. 1. the product of mental activity; that which one thinks: a body of thought. 2. a single act or product of thinking; idea or notion: to collect one s thoughts. 3. the act or process of thinking; mental activity: Thought as&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 39animal learning — ▪ zoology Introduction       the alternation of behaviour as a result of individual experience. When an organism can perceive and change its behaviour, it is said to learn.       That animals can learn seems to go without saying. The cat that&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 40solution — 1. The incorporation of a solid, a liquid, or a gas in a liquid or noncrystalline solid resulting in a homogeneous single phase. See dispersion, suspension. 2. Generally, an aqueous s. of a nonvolatile substance. 3 …

    Medical dictionary