compel+obedience+to

  • 181The Seal of Confession —     The Law of the Seal of Confession     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Law of the Seal of Confession     In the Decretum of the Gratian who compiled the edicts of previous councils and the principles of Church law which he published about 1151,… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 182Ulrich Zwingli —     Ulrich Zwingli     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Ulrich Zwingli     (Also, Huldreich)     Founder of the Reformation in Switzerland, born at Wildhaus in Switzerland, 1 January, 1484; died 11 October, 1531. Zwingli came from a prominent family of… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 183control — con·trol vt con·trolled, con·trol·ling 1: to exercise restraining or directing influence over esp. by law 2: to have power or authority over precedent control s the outcome in this case 3: to have controlling interest in control n …

    Law dictionary

  • 184rule — 1 n 1 a: a prescribed guide for conduct or action b: a regulating principle or precept 2 a: an order or directive issued by a court in a particular proceeding esp. upon petition of a party to the proceeding that commands an officer or party to… …

    Law dictionary

  • 185Constitution of Argentina of 1853 — Argentine Constitution of 1853 Cover of the original manuscript of the 1853 Constitution Ratified …

    Wikipedia

  • 186François Mingaud — Side profile portrait of François Mingaud from Vienna s Weingartner Museum of Billiards[1] Born François Mingaud January 4, 1771 Le Cailar, France …

    Wikipedia

  • 187compulsion — com·pul·sion /kəm pəl shən/ n 1: an act of compelling (as by threat or intimidation); specif: coercion a payment exacted by lawless compulsion E. A. Farnsworth and W. F. Young 2: the state of being compelled; specif …

    Law dictionary

  • 188Utilitarians (The early) — The early utilitarians Bentham and James Mill G.L.Williams Jeremy Bentham was born in 1748 in London; his prosperous father, a lawyer who became wealthy from property rather than the law, planned out for his son a brilliant legal career. After an …

    History of philosophy

  • 189influence — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Power to effect decision Nouns 1. influence, importance, weight, pressure, preponderance; predominance, predominancy (see superiority); power, sway; ascendancy; hegemony, reign, control, authority; bias …

    English dictionary for students

  • 190require — verb 1) the child required hospital treatment Syn: need, be in need of 2) a situation requiring patience Syn: necessitate, demand, call for, involve, entail 3) unquestioning obedience is required …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 191influence — n Influence, authority, prestige, weight, credit are comparable when they mean power exerted over the minds or acts of others either without apparent effort or as the result of the qualities, the position, or the reputation of the person or thing …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 192intimidate — intimidate, cow, bulldoze, bully, browbeat are comparable when meaning to frighten or coerce by frightening means into submission or obedience. Intimidate primarily implies a making timid or fearful, but it often suggests a display or application …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 193require — verb 1) the child required hospital treatment Syn: need 2) a situation requiring patience Syn: necessitate, demand, call for, involve, entail 3) unquestioning obedience is required Syn …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 194coerce — co•erce [[t]koʊˈɜrs[/t]] v. t. erced, erc•ing 1) to compel by force or intimidation: to coerce someone into signing a document[/ex] 2) to bring about through force; exact: to coerce obedience[/ex] 3) to dominate or control, esp. by exploiting… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 195constrain — /kənˈstreɪn / (say kuhn strayn) verb (t) 1. to force, compel, or oblige; bring about by compulsion: to constrain obedience. 2. to confine forcibly, as by bonds. 3. to repress or restrain. {Middle English constreign(en), from Old French… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 196exact — /əgˈzækt / (say uhg zakt), /ɛg / (say eg ) adjective 1. strictly accurate or correct: an exact likeness; an exact description; an exact translation. 2. precise, as opposed to approximate: the exact sum due; the exact date. 3. admitting of no… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 197Spinoza, Baruch — (1632 77)    by Kenneth Surin   In the last few decades the writings of Louis Althusser, Etienne Balibar, Pierre Macherey, Antonio Negri, Deleuze and others, have marked a resurgence of interest in the thought of Baruch Spinoza, in which Spinoza… …

    The Deleuze dictionary

  • 198civil contempt — A species of contempt of court which generally arises from a wilful failure to comply with an order of court such as an injunction as contrasted with criminal contempt which consists generally of contumelious conduct in the presence of the court …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 199civil contempt — A species of contempt of court which generally arises from a wilful failure to comply with an order of court such as an injunction as contrasted with criminal contempt which consists generally of contumelious conduct in the presence of the court …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 200Spinoza, Baruch — (1632 77)    by Kenneth Surin   In the last few decades the writings of Louis Althusser, Etienne Balibar, Pierre Macherey, Antonio Negri, Deleuze and others, have marked a resurgence of interest in the thought of Baruch Spinoza, in which Spinoza… …

    The Deleuze dictionary