Wound

  • 21 wound — 01. My grandfather was [wounded] in the leg during the war. 02. Many soldiers died of their [wounds] in the First World War because medical science wasn t as advanced back then as it is today. 03. A homemade bomb exploded on the bus, killing 3,… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 22 wound — wound1 [waund] the past tense and past participle of ↑wind 2 wound 2 wound2 [wu:nd] n [: Old English; Origin: wund] 1.) an injury to your body that is made by a weapon such as a knife or a bullet ▪ A nurse cleaned and bandaged the wound. ▪ It… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 23 wound — I VERB FORM OF WIND (Pronounced [[t]wa͟ʊnd[/t]] in wound 1, and [[t]wu͟ːnd[/t]] in wound 2.) Wound is the past tense and past participle of wind 2. II INJURY ♦♦ wounds, wounding, wounded (Pronounced [[t]wa͟ʊnd[/t]] in wound 1, and [[t]wu͟ːnd[/t]] …

    English dictionary

  • 24 wound — in·wound; re·wound; un·wound; un·wound·able; wound; wound·i·ly; wound·ing·ly; wound·less; wound·ed·ly; …

    English syllables

  • 25 wound — wound1 [ wund ] noun count ** an injury in which your skin or flesh is damaged, usually seriously. When a wound gets better it heals: He suffered serious wounds to his back and stomach. a head/chest/leg wound: There was blood pouring down his… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 26 wound — I UK [wuːnd] / US [wund] noun [countable] Word forms wound : singular wound plural wounds ** 1) an injury in which your skin or flesh is damaged, usually seriously. When a wound gets better it heals He suffered serious wounds to his back and… …

    English dictionary

  • 27 wound up — adjective brought to a state of great tension (Freq. 1) all wound up for a fight • Syn: ↑aroused • Similar to: ↑tense * * * wound up UK [ˌwaʊnd ˈʌp] US adjective …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 28 wound — {{11}}wound (n.) O.E. wund hurt, injury, from P.Gmc. *wundaz (Cf. O.S. wunda, O.N. und, O.Fris. wunde, O.H.G. wunta, Ger. wunde wound ), perhaps from PIE root *wen to beat, wound. {{12}}wound (v.) O.E. wundian, from the source of …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 29 wound — I [[t]wund[/t]] older use and lit. [[t]waʊnd[/t]] n. 1) pat an injury, usu. involving division of tissue or rupture of the integument or mucous membrane, due to external violence or some mechanical agency rather than disease 2) ppa a similar… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 30 wound — 1. Trauma to any of the tissues of the body, especially that caused by physical means and with interruption of continuity. 2. A surgical incision. [O.E. wund] abraded w. SYN: abrasion (1). avulsed w. a w. caused by or resulting from avulsion.… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 31 wound — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English wund; akin to Old High German wunta wound Date: before 12th century 1. a. an injury to the body (as from violence, accident, or surgery) that typically involves laceration or breaking of a… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 32 wound*/ — [wuːnd] noun [C] I an injury in which your skin or flesh is seriously damaged a head wound[/ex] a stab wound[/ex] He had serious wounds to his stomach.[/ex] II verb [T] wound [wuːnd] 1) to injure someone so that their skin or flesh is seriously… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 33 Wound — Wind Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 34 Wound — Wind Wind, v. t. [From {Wind}, moving air, but confused in sense and in conjugation with wind to turn.] [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound), R. {Winded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 35 wound — 1 the past tense and past participle of wind 2 2 noun (C) 1 an injury, especially a cut or hole made in your skin by a weapon such as a knife or a bullet: A nurse cleaned and bandaged the wound. | gunshot wounds | flesh wound (=slight injury… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 36 wound — A severance or breakage of the skin. Anno: 16 ALR 958, s. 58 ALR 1320. Any abrasion, breach or rupture of the skin or mucous membrane of the body, whereby animal venom or virus, or some impute, poisonous, or irritating matter, may gain entrance… …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 37 wound — coiled coiled (koild), adj. curled or wound especially in concentric rings or spirals; as, a coiled snake ready to strike; the rope lay coiled on the deck. Opposite of {uncoiled}. Note: [Narrower terms: {coiling, helical, spiral, spiraling,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 38 wound — Synonyms and related words: abrade, abrasion, abscess, abuse, ache, aching, afflict, affront, aggrieve, agonize, ail, anguish, aposteme, barb the dart, bark, bed sore, befoul, bewitch, bite, blain, bleb, blemish, blight, blister, bloody, blow,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 39 wound up —    If someone is so excited that they talk non stop, they are wound up.     Claire had so much to tell us after her trip that she was wound up …

    English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • 40 wound — I. /wund / (say woohnd) noun 1. an injury to an organism, usually one involving division of tissue or rupture of the integument or mucous membrane, due to external violence or some mechanical agency rather than disease. 2. a similar injury to the …

    Australian English dictionary