Substratum

  • 121 Substrat — Trägermaterial * * * ◆ Sub|strat auch: Subst|rat 〈n. 11〉 1. Grund , Unterlage 2. 〈Biol.; Chem.; Phys.〉 Nährboden, Grundmaterial, auf das das zu untersuchende Material aufgebracht wird 3. 〈Chem.〉 am Aufbau von Farbstoffen beteiligter farbloser… …

    Universal-Lexikon

  • 122 substrate — (n.) 1810, from Mod.L. substratum (see SUBSTRATUM (Cf. substratum)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 123 subbing — noun working as a substitute for someone who is ill or on leave of absence • Syn: ↑substituting • Derivationally related forms: ↑substitute (for: ↑substituting), ↑sub • Hypernyms: ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 124 sub|stra|tum — «suhb STRAY tuhm, STRAT uhm», noun, plural ta or tums. 1. a layer lying under another: »Beneath the sandy soil there was a substratum of clay ten feet thick. 2. a layer of earth lying just under the surface soil; subsoil. 3. Figurative. basis; …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 125 Subject — Sub*ject , n. [From L. subjectus, through an old form of F. sujet. See {Subject}, a.] 1. That which is placed under the authority, dominion, control, or influence of something else. [1913 Webster] 2. Specifically: One who is under the authority… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 126 substrate — noun Etymology: Medieval Latin substratum Date: 1807 1. substratum 2. the base on which an organism lives < the soil is the substrate of most seed plants > 3. a substance acted upon (as by an enzyme) …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 127 Azerbaijan — This article is about the country in Eurasia. For other uses, see Azerbaijan (disambiguation) …

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  • 128 Huns — The Huns were an early confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi nomads, [Walter Pohl has remarked early medieval peoples were far less homogeneous than often thought. They themselves shared the fundamental belief to be of common… …

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  • 129 Kurdish people — Kurd redirects here. For other uses, see Kurd (disambiguation). Kurds 1st row: Saladin …

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  • 130 Romanian language — Not to be confused with Romani language. Romanian, Daco Romanian română, limba română Pronunciation [roˈmɨnə] Spoken in By a majority …

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  • 131 Sino-Tibetan languages — Sino Tibetan Geographic distribution: East Asia Linguistic classification: One of the world s major language families. Subdivisions: Sinitic Tibeto Burman ISO 639 …

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  • 132 Centum-Satem isogloss — The Centum Satem division is an isogloss of the Indo European language family, related to the evolution of the three dorsal consonant rows reconstructed for Proto Indo European, *Unicode|kʷ (labiovelars), *Unicode|k (velars), and *Unicode|ḱ ;… …

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  • 133 Targum — A targum (Hebrew: תרגום, plural: targumim , lit. translation, interpretation ) is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) written or compiled from the Second Temple period until the early Middle Ages (late first millennium). The two… …

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  • 134 Neoplatonism — Part of a series on Neoplatonism …

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  • 135 Echinoderm — Temporal range: Cambrian–recent …

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  • 136 Dacia — This article is about a historic region in Central Europe. For the Romanian automobile maker, see Automobile Dacia. For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). See also: Dacians and Dacian language Dacian Kingdom independent kingdom …

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  • 137 Rotifer — Rotifera Temporal range: Eocene–Recent …

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  • 138 Fibroblast — A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes and maintains the extracellular matrix of many animal tissues. Fibroblasts provide a structural framework (stroma) for many tissues, and play a critical role in wound healing. They are the most… …

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  • 139 Chiton — This article is about the mollusc. For the ancient Greek article of dress, see Chiton (costume). Chiton Temporal range: Devonian–Recent[1][2] …

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  • 140 Darwin Mounds — describes a vast field of undersea sand mounds situated off the north west coast of Scotland,[1] first discovered in May 1998, they provide a unique habitat for ancient deep water coral reefs. Found using remote sensing techniques, during surveys …

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