Strictness

  • 81Imposturous — Im*pos tur*ous, a. Impostrous; deceitful. [1913 Webster] Strictness fales and impostrous. Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 82Laxity — Lax i*ty (l[a^]ks [i^]*t[y^]), n. [L. laxitas, fr. laxus loose, slack: cf. F. laxit[ e], See {Lax}, a.] The state or quality of being lax; lack of tenseness, strictness, or exactness. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 83Methodist — Meth o*dist, n. [Cf. F. m[ e]thodiste. See {Method}.] 1. One who observes method. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. One of an ancient school of physicians who rejected observation and founded their practice on reasoning and theory. Sir W. Hamilton. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 84Natural religion — Religion Re*li gion (r[ e]*l[i^]j [u^]n), n. [F., from L. religio; cf. religens pious, revering the gods, Gr. ale gein to heed, have a care. Cf. {Neglect}.] 1. The outward act or form by which men indicate their recognition of the existence of a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 85Religion — Re*li gion (r[ e]*l[i^]j [u^]n), n. [F., from L. religio; cf. religens pious, revering the gods, Gr. ale gein to heed, have a care. Cf. {Neglect}.] 1. The outward act or form by which men indicate their recognition of the existence of a god or of …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 86Religion of humanity — Religion Re*li gion (r[ e]*l[i^]j [u^]n), n. [F., from L. religio; cf. religens pious, revering the gods, Gr. ale gein to heed, have a care. Cf. {Neglect}.] 1. The outward act or form by which men indicate their recognition of the existence of a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 87Revealed religion — Religion Re*li gion (r[ e]*l[i^]j [u^]n), n. [F., from L. religio; cf. religens pious, revering the gods, Gr. ale gein to heed, have a care. Cf. {Neglect}.] 1. The outward act or form by which men indicate their recognition of the existence of a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 88Stricture — Stric ture, n. [L. strictura a contraction, from stringere, strictum, to draw tight: cf. F. stricture. See {Strict}.] 1. Strictness. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A man of stricture and firm abstinence. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A stroke; a glance; a touch …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 89Wisdom — Wis dom ( d[u^]m), n. [AS. w[imac]sd[=o]m. See {Wise}, a., and { dom}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The quality of being wise; knowledge, and the capacity to make due use of it; knowledge of the best ends and the best means; discernment and judgment;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 90Wisdom tooth — Wisdom Wis dom ( d[u^]m), n. [AS. w[imac]sd[=o]m. See {Wise}, a., and { dom}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The quality of being wise; knowledge, and the capacity to make due use of it; knowledge of the best ends and the best means; discernment and… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 91negligent — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French & Latin; Anglo French, from Latin neglegent , neglegens, present participle of neglegere Date: 14th century 1. a. marked by or given to neglect especially habitually or culpably b. failing to …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 92puritanism — noun Date: 1573 1. capitalized the beliefs and practices characteristic of the Puritans 2. strictness and austerity especially in matters of religion or conduct …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 93strict — adjective Etymology: Middle English stricte, from Latin strictus, from past participle of stringere to bind tight more at strain Date: 15th century 1. archaic a. tight, close; also intimate b. narrow 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 94tight — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English tiht, thyht dense, solid, watertight, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse thēttr tight; akin to Middle High German dīhte thick, Sanskrit tanakti it causes to coagulate Date: 14th century 1. a. having… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 95Android — An android is a robot designed to resemble a human, usually both in appearance and behavior. The word derives from ανδρός, the genitive of the Greek ανήρ anēr , meaning man , and the suffix eides , used to mean of the species; alike (from eidos,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 96Abbot — The word abbot, meaning father, is a title given to the head of a monastery in various traditions, including Christianity. The office may also be given as an honorary title to a clergyman who is not actually the head of a monastery. The female… …

    Wikipedia

  • 97Abbey — An abbey (from Latin abbatia, derived from Syriac abba, father ), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serves as the spiritual father or mother of the community.Some cities were ruled by heads of …

    Wikipedia

  • 98Abba Arika — (175–247) (Talmudic Aramaic: tm. אבא אריכא) (born Abba bar Aybo) was a Jewish Talmudist who lived in Babylonia, known as an amora (commentator on the Oral Law) of the 3rd century who established at Sura the systematic study of the rabbinic… …

    Wikipedia

  • 99Blues — This article is about the music genre. For other uses, see Blues (disambiguation). Blues Stylistic origins African American folk music Work song Spirituals Cultural origins Late 19th century, southern United States Typical instruments …

    Wikipedia

  • 100Class (computer science) — In object oriented programming, a class is a programming language construct that is used as a blueprint to create objects. This blueprint includes attributes and methods that the created objects all share.More technically, a class is a cohesive… …

    Wikipedia