Labored

  • 101Elaborately — Elaborate E*lab o*rate, a. [L. elaboratus, p. p. of elaborare to work out; e out + laborare to labor, labor labor. See {Labor}.] Wrought with labor; finished with great care; studied; executed with exactness or painstaking; as, an elaborate… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 102Elaborateness — Elaborate E*lab o*rate, a. [L. elaboratus, p. p. of elaborare to work out; e out + laborare to labor, labor labor. See {Labor}.] Wrought with labor; finished with great care; studied; executed with exactness or painstaking; as, an elaborate… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 103Friars of the Strict Observance — Strict Strict, a. [Compar. {Stricter}; superl. {Strictest}.] [L. strictus, p. p. of stringere to draw or bind tight, to strain. See {Strain}, and cf. {Strait}, a.] 1. Strained; drawn close; tight; as, a strict embrace; a strict ligature. Dryden.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 104Gasp — Gasp, n. The act of opening the mouth convulsively to catch the breath; a labored respiration; a painful catching of the breath. [1913 Webster] {At the last gasp}, at the point of death. Addison. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 105Labor — La bor, v. t. [F. labourer, L. laborare.] 1. To work at; to work; to till; to cultivate by toil. [1913 Webster] The most excellent lands are lying fallow, or only labored by children. W. Tooke. [1913 Webster] 2. To form or fabricate with toil,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 106Laboredly — La bored*ly, adv. In a labored manner; with labor. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 107Pains — (p[=a]nz), n. Labor; toilsome effort; care or trouble taken; plural in form, but used with a singular or plural verb, commonly the former. [1913 Webster] And all my pains is sorted to no proof. Shak. [1913 Webster] The pains they had taken was… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 108Pant — (p[.a]nt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Panted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Panting}.] [Cf. F. panteler to gasp for breath, OF. panteisier to be breathless, F. pantois out of breath; perh. akin to E. phantom, the verb prob. orig. meaning, to have the nightmare.] 1 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 109Pant — Pant, v. t. 1. To breathe forth quickly or in a labored manner; to gasp out. [1913 Webster] There is a cavern where my spirit Was panted forth in anguish. Shelley. [1913 Webster] 2. To long for; to be eager after. [R.] [1913 Webster] Then shall… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 110Panted — Pant Pant (p[.a]nt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Panted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Panting}.] [Cf. F. panteler to gasp for breath, OF. panteisier to be breathless, F. pantois out of breath; perh. akin to E. phantom, the verb prob. orig. meaning, to have the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 111Panting — Pant Pant (p[.a]nt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Panted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Panting}.] [Cf. F. panteler to gasp for breath, OF. panteisier to be breathless, F. pantois out of breath; perh. akin to E. phantom, the verb prob. orig. meaning, to have the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 112Pedigree — Ped i*gree, n. [Of unknown origin; possibly fr. F. par degr[ e]s by degrees, for a pedigree is properly a genealogical table which records the relationship of families by degrees; or, perh., fr. F. pied de grue crane s foot, from the shape of the …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 113Periergy — Per i*er gy, n. [Gr. ?, fr. ? overcareful; ? about, beyond + ? work.] 1. Excessive care or diligence. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. (Rhet.) A bombastic or labored style. [R.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 114Second — Sec ond, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Seconded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Seconding}.] [Cf. F. seconder, L. secundare, from secundus. See {Second}, a.] 1. To follow in the next place; to succeed; to alternate. [R.] [1913 Webster] In the method of nature, a low… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 115Seconded — Second Sec ond, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Seconded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Seconding}.] [Cf. F. seconder, L. secundare, from secundus. See {Second}, a.] 1. To follow in the next place; to succeed; to alternate. [R.] [1913 Webster] In the method of nature,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 116Seconding — Second Sec ond, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Seconded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Seconding}.] [Cf. F. seconder, L. secundare, from secundus. See {Second}, a.] 1. To follow in the next place; to succeed; to alternate. [R.] [1913 Webster] In the method of nature,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 117Strict — Strict, a. [Compar. {Stricter}; superl. {Strictest}.] [L. strictus, p. p. of stringere to draw or bind tight, to strain. See {Strain}, and cf. {Strait}, a.] 1. Strained; drawn close; tight; as, a strict embrace; a strict ligature. Dryden. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 118Stricter — Strict Strict, a. [Compar. {Stricter}; superl. {Strictest}.] [L. strictus, p. p. of stringere to draw or bind tight, to strain. See {Strain}, and cf. {Strait}, a.] 1. Strained; drawn close; tight; as, a strict embrace; a strict ligature. Dryden.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 119Strictest — Strict Strict, a. [Compar. {Stricter}; superl. {Strictest}.] [L. strictus, p. p. of stringere to draw or bind tight, to strain. See {Strain}, and cf. {Strait}, a.] 1. Strained; drawn close; tight; as, a strict embrace; a strict ligature. Dryden.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 120The Strict Observance — Strict Strict, a. [Compar. {Stricter}; superl. {Strictest}.] [L. strictus, p. p. of stringere to draw or bind tight, to strain. See {Strain}, and cf. {Strait}, a.] 1. Strained; drawn close; tight; as, a strict embrace; a strict ligature. Dryden.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English