Flout

  • 41flouter — flout·er …

    English syllables

  • 42Flouted — Flout Flout, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Flouted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Flouting}.] [OD. fluyten to play the flute, to jeer, D. fluiten, fr. fluit, fr. French. See {Flute}.] To mock or insult; to treat with contempt. [1913 Webster] Phillida flouts me.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 43Flouting — Flout Flout, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Flouted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Flouting}.] [OD. fluyten to play the flute, to jeer, D. fluiten, fr. fluit, fr. French. See {Flute}.] To mock or insult; to treat with contempt. [1913 Webster] Phillida flouts me.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 44floutingly — flout·ing·ly …

    English syllables

  • 45flaunt — verb he flaunts his young wife as if she were the prize heifer at the county fair Syn: show off, display ostentatiously, make a (great) show of, put on show/display, parade; brag about, crow about, vaunt; informal flash •• flaunt, flout Confusion …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 46Cooperative principle — For the principles governing the functioning of cooperatives, see Rochdale Principles. In social science generally and linguistics specifically, the cooperative principle describes how people interact with one another. As phrased by Paul Grice,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 47Interactional sociolinguistics — is concerned with how speakers signal and interpret meaning in social interaction. The term and the perspective are grounded in the work of John Gumperz (1982a, 1982b) who blended insights and tools from anthropology, linguistics, pragmatics, and …

    Wikipedia

  • 48flaunt — flaunter, n. flauntingly, adv. /flawnt/, v.i. 1. to parade or display oneself conspicuously, defiantly, or boldly. 2. to wave conspicuously in the air. v.t. 3. to parade or display ostentatiously: to flaunt one s wealth. 4. to ignore or treat… …

    Universalium

  • 49law — n. statute, regulation 1) to administer, apply, enforce a law 2) to adopt, enact, pass; draft; promulgate a law 3) to obey, observe a law 4) to interpret a law (courts interpret laws) 5) to annul, repeal, revoke a law; to declare a law… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 50scoff — scoff, jeer, gibe, fleer, gird, sneer, flout can all mean to show one s scorn or contempt in derision or mockery. Scoff stresses insolence, irreverence, lack of respect, or incredulity as the motives for one s derision or mockery {it is an easy… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 51flaunt — flaunt, flout The two words are unrelated. To flaunt means ‘to display ostentatiously’: • Women should have it both ways they should be able to flaunt their sexuality and be taken seriously E. Wurtzel, 1998. To flout means ‘to show contempt for… …

    Modern English usage

  • 52flaunt´ing|ly — flaunt «flnt, flahnt», verb, noun. –v.t. to show off; try to impress others with; display ostentatiously or obtrusively: »She flaunts her riches before her friends. SYNONYM(S): flourish, obtrude. –v.i. 1. to parade oneself boastfully, impudently …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 53flaunt´er — flaunt «flnt, flahnt», verb, noun. –v.t. to show off; try to impress others with; display ostentatiously or obtrusively: »She flaunts her riches before her friends. SYNONYM(S): flourish, obtrude. –v.i. 1. to parade oneself boastfully, impudently …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 54List of commonly misused English words — This is a list of English words which are commonly misused. It is meant to include only words whose misuse is deprecated by most usage writers, editors, and other professional linguists of Standard English. It is possible that some of the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 55jeer — 1. noun /dʒir/ a) A railing remark or reflection; a scoff; a taunt; a biting jest; a flout; a jibe; mockery. Midas, exposed to all their jeers, Had lost his art, and kept his ears. b) …

    Wiktionary

  • 56defy — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. See defiance. II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. resist, challenge, flout; see dare 2 , oppose 1 , 2 . III (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) v. rebel, resist, challenge, flout, disregard, oppose, brave, frustrate,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 57disobey — I (Roget s IV) v. Syn. defy, resist, rebel, balk, decline, neglect, set aside, desert, be remiss, ignore the commands of, refuse submission to, disagree, oppose, contravene, refuse to support, evade, disregard the authority of, break rules, flout …

    English dictionary for students

  • 58gibe — I. v. n. Sneer, scoff, jeer, fleer, flout. II. v. a. Flout, taunt, deride, ridicule, jeer, twit, scoff at, sneer at, jeer at. III. n. Sneer, scoff, taunt, flout, biting jest …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 59jeer — I. v. n. Sneer, scoff, flout, mock, gibe, fleer, rail. II. v. a. Flout, taunt, deride, ridicule, mock, gibe, scoff, spurn, despise, contemn, chaff at, sneer at, jeer at, rail at, gibe at, crook the finger at. III. n. Sneer, scoff, taunt, gibe,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 60Gibe — Gibe, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gibed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gibing}.] [Cf. Prov. F. giber, equiv. to F. jouer to play, Icel. geipa to talk nonsense, E. jabber.] To cast reproaches and sneering expressions; to rail; to utter taunting, sarcastic words; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English