Factitious

  • 121facile — late 15c., from M.Fr. facile easy, from L. facilis easy to do and, of persons, pliant, courteous, from facere to do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Facilitate is from 1610s …

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  • 122facsimile — 1660s, from L. fac simile make similar, from fac imperative of facere to make (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) + simile, neut. of similis like, similar (see SIMILAR (Cf. similar)) …

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  • 123fact — (n.) 1530s, action, especially evil deed, from L. factum event, occurrence, lit. thing done, neuter pp. of facere to do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Usual modern sense of thing known to be true appeared 1630s, from notion of something that… …

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  • 124faction — (n.) c.1500, from M.Fr. faction (14c.) and directly from L. factionem (nom. factio) political party, class of persons, lit. a making or doing, from pp. stem of facere to do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). In ancient Rome, one of the companies… …

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  • 125factor — {{11}}factor (n.) early 15c., agent, deputy, from M.Fr. facteur agent, representative, from L. factor doer or maker, agent noun from pp. stem of facere to do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Sense of circumstance producing a result is from 1816 …

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  • 126factotum — 1560s, from M.L. factotum do everything, from fac, imperative of facere do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) + totum all (see TOTAL (Cf. total)) …

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  • 127faineant — 1610s (n.), from Fr. fainéant (16c.) do nothing, from fait, third person singular present tense of faire (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) + néant nothing (Cf. DOLCE FAR NIENTE (Cf. dolce far niente)). A French folk etymology of O.Fr. faignant… …

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  • 128fashion — {{11}}fashion (n.) c.1300, shape, manner, mode, from O.Fr. façon (12c.) face, appearance; construction, pattern, design; thing done; beauty; manner, characteristic feature, from L. factionem (nom. factio) group of people acting together, lit. a… …

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  • 129feasance — 1530s, from Anglo Fr. fesance, from O.Fr. faisance action, deed, enactment, from faisant, prp. of faire to make, do (from L. facere; see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) …

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  • 130feasible — capable of being done, accomplished or carried out, mid 15c., from Anglo Fr. faisible, from O.Fr. faisable possible, easy, convenient, from fais , stem of faire do, make, from L. facere do, perform (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Fowler… …

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  • 131feat — mid 14c., action, deeds, from Anglo Fr. fet, from O.Fr. fait (12c.) action, deed, achievement, from L. factum thing done, a noun based on the pp. of facere make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Sense of exceptional or noble deed arose… …

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  • 132feature — {{11}}feature (n.) early 14c., make, form, fashion, from Anglo Fr. feture, from O.Fr. faiture deed, action; fashion, shape, form; countenance, from L. factura a formation, a working, from pp. stem of facere make, do, perform (see FACTITIOUS (Cf.… …

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  • 133fetish — 1610s, fatisso, from Port. feitiço charm, sorcery, from L. facticius made by art, from facere to make (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). L. facticius in Spanish has become hechizo magic, witchcraft, sorcery. Probably introduced by Portuguese… …

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  • 134fiat — authoritative sanction, 1630s, from L. fiat let it be done (also used in the opening of M.L. proclamations and commands), third person singular present subjunctive of fieri, used as passive of facere to make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) …

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  • 135forfeit — {{11}}forfeit (n.) c.1300, misdeed, from O.Fr. forfait crime, punishable offense (12c.), originally pp. of forfaire transgress, from for outside, beyond (from L. foris; see FOREIGN (Cf. foreign)) + faire to do (from L. facere; see FACTITIOUS …

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  • 136fortify — early 15c., increase efficacy (of medicine); mid 15c., provide (a town) with walls and defenses, from O.Fr. fortifiier (14c.) to fortify, strengthen, from L.L. fortificare to strengthen, make strong, from L. fortis strong (see FORT (Cf. fort)) +… …

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  • 137frigorific — causing cold, 1660s, from Fr. frigorifique, from L.L. frigorificus cooling, from L. frigus (gen. frigoris) cold, cool, coolness (see FRIGID (Cf. frigid)) + ficus “making,” root of facere make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf …

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  • 138fructify — early 14c., from O.Fr. fructifiier (12c.) bear fruit, grow, develop, from L.L. fructificare bear fruit, from L. fructus (see FRUIT (Cf. fruit)) + root of facere make (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Related: Fructified; fructifying …

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  • 139glorify — mid 14c., from O.Fr. glorifier, from L.L. glorificare to glorify, from L. gloria (see GLORY (Cf. glory)) + ficare, from facere to make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Related: GLORIFIED (Cf. Glorified); …

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  • 140gratify — (v.) c.1400, to bestow grace upon; 1530s, to show gratitude to, from Fr. gratifier (16c.) or directly from L. gratificari to do favor to, oblige, gratify, from gratus pleasing (see GRACE (Cf. grace)) + root of facere make, do, perform (see… …

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