Factitious

  • 81Silicosis — Classification and external resources ICD 10 J62 ICD 9 502 …

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  • 82DSM-IV Codes (alphabetical) — Contents 1 A 2 B 3 C 4 D 5 E 6 F …

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  • 83Classification of mental disorders — Main article: Mental disorder Psychology …

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  • 84Munchausen by Internet — is a type of factitious disorder which utilizes the Internet s easy access to a broad audience. It is not recognized by the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). The term was coined by Marc D Feldman, M.D. [… …

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  • 85List of cutaneous conditions — This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. See also: Cutaneous conditions, Category:Cutaneous conditions, and ICD 10… …

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  • 86List of mental disorders — This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. The following is a list of mental disorders as defined by the DSM and ICD. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the American Psychiatric Association s standard… …

    Wikipedia

  • 87fictitious — See factitious. See factitious, fictitious …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 88fetish — [17] Fetish is a doublet of factitious: that is to say, the two words have a common origin, but have subsequently diverged widely. Both come ultimately from Latin factītius ‘made by art’, an adjective derived from the past participle of facere… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 89unnatural — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. artificial, factitious; affected, stagy, insincere; strange, abnormal, foreign; monstrous, freakish, misshapen; merciless, cold. See affectation, malevolence, unconformity. II (Roget s IV) modif. 1 …

    English dictionary for students

  • 90-fication — suffix meaning a making or causing, from L. ficationem (nom. ficatio), ultimately from facere to make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 91-fy — suffix meaning to make into, from Fr. fier, from L. ficare, from unstressed form of facere to make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 92abortifacient — (n.) 1875, noun and adjective, from L. abortus (see ABORTIVE (Cf. abortive)) + facientem making, related to facere do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). An earlier word for this in the noun sense was abortive (1640s) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 93abscond — (v.) 1560s, from M.Fr. abscondre and directly from L. abscondere to hide, conceal, put out of sight, from ab(s) away (see AB (Cf. ab )) + condere put together, store, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + dere …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 94affair — (n.) c.1300, what one has to do, from Anglo French afere, O.Fr. afaire (12c., Mod.Fr. affaire) business, event; rank, estate, from the infinitive phrase à faire to do, from L. ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + facere to do, make (see FACTITIOUS …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 95affect — {{11}}affect (n.) late 14c., mental state, from Latin noun use of affectus furnished, supplied, endowed, figuratively disposed, constituted, inclined, pp. of afficere to do; treat, use, manage, handle; act on; have influence on, do something to,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 96amplify — (v.) early 15c., to enlarge or expand, from M.Fr. amplifier, from L. amplificare to enlarge, from amplificus splendid, from amplus large (see AMPLE (Cf. ample)) + the root of facere make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 97anathema — (n.) 1520s, an accursed thing, from L. anathema an excommunicated person; the curse of excommunication, from Gk. anathema a thing accursed, originally a thing devoted, lit. a thing set up (to the gods), from ana up (see ANA (Cf. ana )) + tithenai …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 98antithesis — (n.) 1520s, from L.L. antithesis, from Gk. antithesis opposition, resistance, lit. a placing against, also a term in logic and rhetoric, noun of action from antitithenai to set against, oppose, a term in logic, from anti against (see ANTI (Cf.… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 99apothecary — (n.) mid 14c., shopkeeper, especially one who stores, compounds, and sells medicaments, from O.Fr. apotecaire (13c., Mod.Fr. apothicaire), from L.L. apothecarius storekeeper, from L. apotheca storehouse, from Gk. apotheke barn, storehouse, lit. a …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 100artifact — (n.) 1821, artefact, anything made by human art, from It. artefatto, from L. arte by skill (ablative of ars art; see ART (Cf. art) (n.)) + factum thing made, from facere to make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf …

    Etymology dictionary