Equinoctial+point

  • 61Sideral time — Sidereal Si*de re*al, a. [L. sidereus, from sidus, sideris, a constellation, a star. Cf. {Sideral}, {Consider}, {Desire}.] 1. Relating to the stars; starry; astral; as, sidereal astronomy. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astron.) Measuring by the apparent… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 62Sidereal — Si*de re*al, a. [L. sidereus, from sidus, sideris, a constellation, a star. Cf. {Sideral}, {Consider}, {Desire}.] 1. Relating to the stars; starry; astral; as, sidereal astronomy. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astron.) Measuring by the apparent motion of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 63Sidereal clock — Sidereal Si*de re*al, a. [L. sidereus, from sidus, sideris, a constellation, a star. Cf. {Sideral}, {Consider}, {Desire}.] 1. Relating to the stars; starry; astral; as, sidereal astronomy. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astron.) Measuring by the apparent… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 64year — Sidereal Si*de re*al, a. [L. sidereus, from sidus, sideris, a constellation, a star. Cf. {Sideral}, {Consider}, {Desire}.] 1. Relating to the stars; starry; astral; as, sidereal astronomy. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astron.) Measuring by the apparent… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 65Pegasus — noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Pegasi), from Greek Pēgasos Date: 14th century 1. a winged horse that causes the stream Hippocrene to spring from Mount Helicon with a blow of his hoof 2. archaic poetic inspiration 3. a northern constellation near …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 66146 BC — NOTOC EventsBy placeRome*With Carthage and Greece conquered, Rome becomes the sole superpower in the Mediterranean world, a distinction it will continue to hold for approximately the next 700 years. Africa*Carthage falls to Roman forces under… …

    Wikipedia

  • 67Gamma Arietis — γ¹ Arietis Observation data Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000 Constellation Aries Right ascension 01h 53m 31.8s Declination +19° 17′ 45.0″ …

    Wikipedia

  • 68Moby Dick Coin — Known in the numismatic world as a Moby Dick Coin , the Ecuadorian 8 Escudos doubloon, minted in Quito, Ecuador, between 1838 and 1843, is the one ounce of gold sixteen dollar piece Captain Ahab nails to the mast of the Pequod, promising it to… …

    Wikipedia

  • 69Pegasus — noun a) A winged horse fabled to have sprung from the neck of Medusa when she was slain. He is noted for causing, with a blow of his hoof, Hippocrene, the inspiring fountain of the Muses, to spring from Mount Helicon. Bellerophon rode Pegasus… …

    Wiktionary

  • 70Hipparchus — (c. 170 bc–c. 120 bc) Greek astronomer and geographer Born at Nicaea, which is now in Turkey, Hipparchus (hi par kus) worked in Rhodes, where he built an observatory, and in Alexandria. None of his works has survived but many of them were… …

    Scientists

  • 71equinox — [ i:kwɪnɒks, ˌɛkwɪ ] noun the time or date (twice each year, about 22 September and 20 March) at which the sun crosses the celestial equator, when day and night are of equal length. ↘another term for equinoctial point. Origin ME: from OFr.… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 72equinox — n. Equinoctial point, intersection of the equator and the ecliptic …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 73equinox — [ē′kwi näks΄, ek′wə näks] n. [ME < OFr equinoxe < ML aequinoxium < L aequinoctium < aequus (see EQUAL) + nox, NIGHT] 1. the time when the sun in its apparent annual movement along the ecliptic crosses the celestial equator, making… …

    English World dictionary

  • 74equinox — n. 1 the time or date (twice each year) at which the sun crosses the celestial equator, when day and night are of equal length. 2 = equinoctial point. Phrases and idioms: autumn (or autumnal) equinox about 22 Sept. spring (or vernal) equinox… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 75American Braille — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 76At all points — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 77Nine points of the law — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 78pointer — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 79Points of the compass — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 80Armillary sphere — An armillary sphere (variations are known as spherical astrolabe, armilla, or armil) is a model of the celestial sphere. Description and use of the armillary sphere The exterior parts of this machine are a compages of brass rings, which represent …

    Wikipedia