Lath


Lath

A lath is a thin, narrow strip of some straight-grained wood or other material, including metal or gypsum. A lattice, or lattice-work, is a criss-crossed or interlaced arrangement of laths, or the pattern made by such an arrangement. Lath is the basic material used in the formerly common building technique known as lath and plaster, which was used to make interior walls.

Uses

The word stems from Old English "laett", Mid. Eng. "lappe", a form possibly due to the Welsh "liath"; the word appears in many Teutonic languages, e.g. Dutch "lat", German "Latte", and has passed into Romanic, cf. Italian "latta", French "latte"), denoting a thin flat strip of wood or other material used in building to form a base or groundwork for plaster, or for tiles, slates or other covering for roofs. Such strips of wood are employed to form lattice-work, or for the bars of venetian blinds or shutters.

Historical significance

A window with a lattice painted red was formerly a common inn-sign (cf. Shakespeare, 2 Hen. IV. ii. 2. 86); frequently the window was dispensed with, and the sign remained painted on a board.

Gypsum lath consists of gypsum plaster sandwiched between two sheets of absorbent paper. It was invented in 1910, and multiple variations were developed in the 1930s. Gypsum was safer than wood lath as it wasn't combustible, was easier to use, and gave better results. The lath and plaster method declined in the 1950s, as it was replaced by the more efficient drywall.

ee also

*Plasterwork#Laths
*Lattice truss bridge
*Garden trellis
*Lathart


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  • lath — lath; lath·er·er; lath·ery; lath·ing; lath·raea; lath·ri·di·idae; lath·y·rism; lath·y·rus; lath·y·rit·ic; lath·y·ro·gen; coun·ter·lath; lath·er; lath·y·ro·gen·ic; …   English syllables

  • lath´er|er — lath|er 1 «laTH uhr», noun, verb. –noun. 1. foam made from soap and water. SYNONYM(S): suds. 2. foam formed in sweating: »the lather of a horse after a race. SYNONYM(S): froth. 3. Slang, Figurative. a state of great agitation or excitement: »He… …   Useful english dictionary

  • lath|er — 1 «laTH uhr», noun, verb. –noun. 1. foam made from soap and water. SYNONYM(S): suds. 2. foam formed in sweating: »the lather of a horse after a race. SYNONYM(S): froth. 3. Slang, Figurative. a state of great agitation or excitement: »He worked… …   Useful english dictionary

  • lath|y — «LATH ee, LAHTH », adjective, lath|i|er, lath|i|est. long and slender, like a lath: »a lathy young man …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lath — Lath, n.; pl. {Laths}. [OE. laththe, latthe, latte, AS. l[ae]tta; akin to D. lat, G. latte, OHG. latta; cf. W. llath a rod, staff, yard. Cf. {Lattice}, {Latten}.] A thin, narrow strip of wood, nailed to the rafters, studs, or floor beams of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lath — (n.) late 13c., probably from O.E. *læððe, variant of lætt lath, apparently from a P.Gmc. *laþþo (Cf. O.S., O.N. latta, M.Du., Ger. latte lath, Du. lat, M.H.G. lade plank, which is source of Ger. Laden counter, hence, shop ). As a verb, 1530s,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • lath — [lath, läth] n. pl. laths [lathz, laths, läthz, läths] [ME lathe (< OE * læthth, akin to OHG latta) & latte (< OE lætt, akin to ON latto)] 1. any of the thin, narrow strips of wood used in lattices or nailed to two by fours, rafters, etc.… …   English World dictionary

  • Lath — Lath, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lathed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Lathing}.] To cover or line with laths. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lath — lath, lathe A lath, pronounced lahth, is a flat strip of wood. The plural is laths, pronounced lahths or occasionally lahdhz. A lathe, pronounced laydh, is a machine for shaping wood or metal, and has the plural form lathes, pronounced laydhz …   Modern English usage

  • lath|er|y — «laTH uhr ee», adjective. consisting of or covered with lather …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lath — (spr. Läsh), in England eine Grafschaftsabtheilung, Grafschaftsbezirk …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon


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