Ginza (silver monopoly)


Ginza (silver monopoly)

was the Tokugawa shogunate's officially-sanctioned silver monopoly or silver guild ("za") [Jansen, Marius. (1995). [http://books.google.com/books?id=cY6GRGa2vPoC&pg=PA186&dq=Sakuji+bugy%C5%8D&client=firefox-a&sig=L8gfM1y6f6fnv2EYmHPE2-VeMZU#PPA186,M1 "Warrior Rule in Japan," p. 186,] citing John Whitney Hall. (1955). "Tanuma Okitsugu: Forerunner of Modern Japan." Cambridge: Harvard University Press.] which was created in 1598. [Schaede, Ulrike. (2000). [http://books.google.com/books?id=nJWsPT_FYkEC&pg=PA223&lpg=PA223&dq=tokugawa+silver+monopoly&source=web&ots=HOclxeoWk4&sig=L69ETJIk0GkSHsj2e1gCIFJ6W9U&hl=en#PPA223,M1 "Cooperative Capitalism: Self-Regulation, Trade Associations, and the Antimonopoly Law in Japan," p. 223.] ]

Initially, the Tokugawa shogunate was interested in assuring a consistent value in minted silver coins; and this led to the perceived need for attending to the supply of silver.

This "bakufu" title identifies a corporate entity with responsibility for supervising the minting of silver coins and for superintending all silver mines, silver mining and silver-extraction activities in Japan. [Hall, John Wesley. (1955) [http://books.google.com/books?id=x0WCAAAAIAAJ&q=kinzan+bugyo&dq=kinzan+bugyo&lr=&pgis=1 "Tanuma Okitsugu: Foreruner of Modern Japan," p. 201] ]

Notes

References

* Hall, John Wesley. (1955). [http://books.google.com/books?id=x0WCAAAAIAAJ&q=kinzan+bugyo&dq=kinzan+bugyo&lr=&pgis=1 "Tanuma Okitsugu: Foreruner of Modern Japan."] Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
* Jansen, Marius B. (1995). [http://books.google.com/books?id=cY6GRGa2vPoC&dq=Sakuji+bugy%C5%8D&client=firefox-a&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0 "Warrior Rule in Japan."] Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 10-ISBN 0-521-48404-9
* Schaede, Ulrike. (2000). [http://books.google.com/books?id=nJWsPT_FYkEC&dq=tokugawa+silver+monopoly&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0 "Cooperative Capitalism: Self-Regulation, Trade Associations, and the Antimonopoly Law in Japan."] Oxford: Oxford University Press. 10-ISBN 0-198-29718-1; 13-ISBN 978-0-198-29718-5 (cloth)

ee also

* bugyō
* Kinzan-bugyō
* "Kinza" - Gold "za" (monopoly office or guild).
* "Dōza" - Copper "za" (monopoly office or guild).
* "Shuza" - Cinnabar "za" (monopoly office or guild)




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