Inlays and onlays


Inlays and onlays
Inlays and onlays
Intervention
ICD-9-CM 23.3
MeSH D007284

In dentistry, an inlay is an indirect restoration (filling) consisting of a solid substance (as gold or porcelain) fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place.[1] An onlay is the same as an inlay, except that it extends to replace a cusp. Crowns are onlays which completely cover all surfaces of a tooth.

Contents

Inlays

An impression of preparation for restoration with a DO gold inlay on tooth #5. The "DO" designation indicates that the gold serves as a restoration for the distal and occlusal surfaces of the tooth. This tooth was prepared and the inlay will be fabricated according to the R.V. Tucker method of gold inlay preparation. Notice how the line angles of the impression for the inlay are very sharp and precise; this is achieved using carbon-tipped stainless steel instruments. The salmon-colored polyvinylsiloxane impression material is less viscous than the blue and is able to capture better detail for the tooth being restored.

Sometimes, a tooth is planned to be restored with an intracoronal restoration, but the decay or fracture is so extensive that a direct restoration, such as amalgam or composite, would compromise the structural integrity of the restored tooth or provide substandard opposition to occlusal (i.e., biting) forces. In such situations, an indirect gold or porcelain inlay restoration may be indicated. When an inlay is used, the tooth-to-restoration margin may be finished and polished to such a super-fine line of contact that recurrent decay will be all but impossible. While these restorations might be ten times the price of direct restorations, the superiority of an inlay in terms of resistance to occlusal forces, protection against recurrent decay, precision of fabrication, marginal integrity, proper contouring for gingival (tissue) health, and ease of cleansing offers an excellent alternative to the direct restoration.

An MO gold inlay on tooth #3, the "MO" designation indicating that the gold serves as a restoration for the mesial and occlusal surfaces of the tooth. This tooth was also restored according to the R.V. Tucker method. Notice how the gold appears to flow into the tooth structure, almost perfectly mimicking the natural contours and even allowing the specular reflection to continue over the margin from tooth to gold.

Onlays

When decay or fracture incorporate areas of a tooth that make amalgam or composite restorations inadequate, such as cuspal fracture or remaining tooth structure that undermines perimeter walls of a tooth, an onlay might be indicated. Similar to an inlay, an onlay is an indirect restoration which incorporates a cusp or cusps by covering or onlaying the missing cusps. All of the benefits of an inlay are present in the onlay restoration. The onlay allows for conservation of tooth structure when the only alternative is to totally eliminate cusps and perimeter walls for restoration with a crown. Just as inlays, onlays are fabricated outside of the mouth and are typically made out of gold or porcelain. Gold restorations have been around for many years and have an excellent track record. In recent years, newer types of porcelains have been developed that seem to rival the longevity of gold. If the onlay or inlay is made in a dental laboratory, a temporary is fabricated while the restoration is custom-made for the patient. A return visit is then required to fit the final prosthesis. Inlays and onlays may also be fabricated out of porcelain and delivered the same day utilizing techniques and technologies relating to CAD/CAM dentistry. [2][3]

References

  1. ^ NW Medical Guide
  2. ^ Masek R, Tsotsos S (October 2002). "Ultimate accuracy with correlation". Int J Comput Dent 5 (4): 295–303. PMID 12736941. 
  3. ^ Masek R (January 2003). "Designing in 3D—a more visual approach to Cerec correlation". Int J Comput Dent 6 (1): 75–82. PMID 12838591. 

Further reading


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Inlays and onlays (bookbinding) — In bookbinding, inlays and onlays are pieces of leather adhered to the cover of a book, usually differing in color, grain, or both from the main covering leather. While they are complementary techniques, and may appear similar in their final… …   Wikipedia

  • Dental restoration — Intervention ICD 9 CM 23.2 23.4 A dental restoration or dental filling is a dental restorative ma …   Wikipedia

  • Crown (dentistry) — Intervention ICD 9 CM 23.41 MeSH …   Wikipedia

  • Inlay (disambiguation) — Inlay is a decorative technique whereby different materials are inserted to depressions in a base object.It may also refer to: *Inlay (guitar), inlays on guitars and similar music instruments *Inlays and onlays in dentistry, which are indirect… …   Wikipedia

  • Tooth — Infobox Anatomy Name = Teeth Caption = An adult human s teeth. Caption2 = CGI posterior view of teeth taken from inside of mouthTeeth (singular, Tooth) are small whitish structures found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates that are used… …   Wikipedia

  • Dental restorative materials — This page is about types of dental restorative materials. For dental fillings see dental restorations Dental restorative materials are specially fabricated materials, designed for use as dental restorations (fillings), which are used to restore… …   Wikipedia

  • Dentures — Intervention MeSH D003778 …   Wikipedia

  • Dental surgery — Intervention A dental officer and his assistant remove the wisdom tooth of a crew member of the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) …   Wikipedia

  • Tooth (human) — For other uses of tooth or teeth , see Tooth (disambiguation). Teeth An adult human s teeth …   Wikipedia

  • Nankali post system — The Nankali post system is a post and core prosthesis, which is used in prosthodontology and dental restoration. This post and core consists of a single smooth or serrated post and core which has an additional circle ring around it. Nankali post… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.