Limit or extend limits of debate


Limit or extend limits of debate

The motion to limit or extend limits of debate is used to modify the rules of debate.

Contents

Explanation and Use

Limit or extend limits of debate (RONR)
Class Subsidiary motion
In order when another has the floor? No
Requires second? Yes
Debatable? No
May be reconsidered? Yes; but if vote was affirmative, only unexecuted part of order. A negative vote on this motion can be reconsidered only until such time as progress in business or debate has made it essentially a new question
Amendable? Yes
Vote required: Two-thirds

Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised

The default norm is allowing each member of a deliberative assembly to make two ten-minute speeches, with a requirement that a member wait for other members who have not spoken on the question to speak before making his second speech.[1]

The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure

Limit or extend debate (TSC)
Class Subsidiary motion
In order when another has the floor? No
Requires second? Yes
Debatable? Yes
May be reconsidered? No
Amendable? Yes
Vote required: Two-thirds

TSC implements this concept as the motion to extend or limit debate. As with Robert's Rules of Order, a variety of limits may be imposed on the debate, including:

  • Limiting the number of minutes allotted to each member. As TSC normally allows for speeches of unlimited length, this motion can impose time limits.
  • Limiting the number of minutes allotted to the entire debate.
  • The number of speeches each member may make.
  • The number of speeches that may be made both for and against the motion, regardless of who makes them.

Alternatively, the motion can also modify or remove limits already imposed. For example, if each speaker is given three minutes, and a speaker reaches their maximum, they may use this motion to request an additional 30 seconds to finish their remarks.

Because this motion by definition limits or changes the limits of the freedom of the body, it requires a vote of two-thirds to pass.

TSC does not normally limit the length of speeches as Robert's does, noting, "Parliamentary law fixes no limit on the length of speeches during debate...Debate can ordinarily be kept within reasonable time limits by the presiding officer's insistence that all discussion be confined strictly to the subject."[2] Also, TSC allows the motion to limit or extend debate to be debated, but only on the merits of the limitations. As with all subsidiary motions, TSC does not allow this motion to be reconsidered.

References

  1. ^ Robert, Henry M. (2000). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 10th ed., p. 41
  2. ^ Sturgis, Alice (2001). The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure, 4th ed., p. 127

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Debate (parliamentary procedure) — Debate or discussion in parliamentary procedure refers to discussion on the merits of a pending question; that is, whether it should or not be agreed to. Robert s Rules of Order notes that Debate, rightly understood, is an essential element in… …   Wikipedia

  • Health care reform debate in the United States — See also: Health care reform in the United States, Health care in the United States, and Uninsured in the United States Health care in the United States Public health care Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Indian Health Service… …   Wikipedia

  • Table (parliamentary procedure) — In parliamentary procedure, a motion to table has two different and contradictory meanings: In the United States, table usually means the motion to lay on the table or motion to postpone consideration; a proposal to suspend consideration of a… …   Wikipedia

  • Main motion — A main motion, in parliamentary procedure, is a motion that brings business before the assembly.[1] Main motions are made while no other motion is pending. Any of the subsidiary, incidental and privileged motions may be made while the main motion …   Wikipedia

  • Amend (motion) — The motion to amend, in parliamentary procedure, is used to modify another motion. Contents 1 Explanation and Use 1.1 Main Motions 1.2 Secondary Motions 1.3 Forms and Uses of the Moti …   Wikipedia

  • Previous question — Previous question, in parliamentary procedure (also known as calling for the question, calling the question, close debate and other terms) is a motion to end debate, and the moving of amendments, on any debatable or amendable motion and bring… …   Wikipedia

  • Appeal (motion) — In parliamentary procedure, an appeal from the decision of the chair is used to challenge a ruling of the chair. Appeal (RONR) Class Incidental motion In order when another has the floor? Yes, at time of appealed ruling Requires second? Yes… …   Wikipedia

  • Committee of the Whole — A Committee of the Whole is a device in which a legislative body or other deliberative assembly is considered one large committee. All members of the legislative body are members of such a committee. This is usually done for the purposes of… …   Wikipedia

  • Quorum — For other uses, see Quorum (disambiguation). A quorum is the minimum number of members of a deliberative assembly (a body that uses parliamentary procedure, such as a legislature) necessary to conduct the business of that group. According to… …   Wikipedia

  • Commit (motion) — The motion to commit (or refer), in parliamentary procedure, is used to refer another motion usually a main motion to a committee. Contents 1 Explanation and Use 1.1 Robert s Rules of Order Newly Revised (RONR) 1.2 …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.