Exposure action value


Exposure action value

Exposure Action Value

An Exposure Action Value (EAV) or Action Value (AV) is a limit set on occupational exposure to noise where beyond those values, employers must take steps to monitor the exposure levels. These levels are measured in decibels. The American Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) set the EAV to 85 dB(A). When the 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) reachs 85dB(A) employers are required to administer a continuing, effective hearing conservation program. The program consists of monitoring, employee notification, observation, an audiometric testing program, hearing protectors, training programs, and record keeping requirements.

Purpose

The purpose of the EAV is to ensure that employees are not suffering from high levels of noise exposure. OSHA requires employers to take steps to reduce exposure levels when the TWA reaches 90 dB(A). The EVA is to ensure that the exposure levels do not reach 90 dB(A) or more. It is also to ensure that employees are not experiencing noise-induced hearing loss.

Use

A noise dosimeter is used to measure noise exposures to employees. Dosimeters can be used to determine the TWA. If it is determined that levels of noise exposure have reached the EAV, employers are required to implement a hearing conservation program. The hearing conservation program consists of many different aspects.

The first aspect is monitoring. The employer is required to monitor noise exposure for all of its employees who may be exposed at a TWA at or above 85 dB(A). This is to identify employees for inclusion in the hearing conservation program and to enable the proper selection of hearing protectors.

The second aspect is the audiometric testing program. Employees exposed to levels at or above the EAV will undergo audiometric testing. The first test is called a baseline. It provides a standard to compare future audiometric tests to. If a significant change in hearing capabilities occurs (called a standard threshold shift) greater steps must be taken to ensure the employee is protected from high levels of noise exposure.

The third aspect is the implementation of hearing protection. Employers must make hearing protection available to all employees who are exposed to noise levels of 85 dB(A) or greater. This is to be at no cost to employees. Employees can pick whichever type of hearing protection they prefer. This also requires an ongoing evaluation of the hearing protection.

The fourth aspect is a training program. The training program must cover the effects of noise on hearing, the purpose of hearing protection, and the purpose of audiometric testing.

The last aspect is recordkeeping. Records of employee audiometric tests must be retained for two years. This information must also be available to the employees.

External links

* [http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=9735&p_table=STANDARDS OSHA Occupational Noise Exposure Regulation 1910.95]

ee also

*Hearing impairment
*Audiometry
*Hearing Conservation Program
*Noise-induced hearing loss


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