Chech


Chech
The Chech region in Bulgaria and Greece.

Chech (Bulgarian: Чеч) or Chechko (Bulgarian: Чечко) is a geographical and historical region of the Balkan peninsula in southeastern Europe in our days Bulgaria and Greece. Most of its population inhabits about 60 villages and is almost completely Pomak.[1]

The Chech region is situated in the much larger region of Macedonia and covers the western Rhodope Mountains and the northern slopes of Falakro with most of its territory in our days Greece. It is divided in two: Drama Chech and Nevrokopi Chech. The first one and partially the second one is in Greece.[1]

According to Vasil Kanchov the eastern border of Chech is the Dospat River and the western one is the river of Dabnitsa.[2] Thus the Chech comprises the municipalities: Satovcha, Dospat and the villages in the valleys of the Dospat River and Bistritsa river. Then all villages in the Bulgarian Chech are populated by pomaks except the villages of Satovcha and Dolen which are partially inhabited by Bulgarian Christians. The villages in the Greek Chech are organized in the Kato Nevrokopi municipality and in the Sidironero community. The Pomaki population of the Greek Chech was trade with Turkey, Western Thrace and Bulgaria in the 20s during the refugee exchange after World War I base on nationality origin, religion and language.[1]

Contents

Settlements of Nevrokopski Chech

The major settlements of the northern part of Chech are enlisted by Vasil Kanchov in two of his works.[3][4]

Settlements in Bulgaria

Settlements in Greece

  • Drama municipality: Kastanohoma (Zarnovitsa), Mirsinero (Pepelash)
  • Nevrokopi municipality: Agios Petros (Peruh), Agriokerasea (Izbishta), Ahladomilea (Debren), Delta (Vitovo), Diplohori (Dablen), Eklisaki (Manastir), Erimoklisia (Kolyarba), Katahloron (Rakishten), Kremasta (Lozna), Kritaristra (Kashitsa), Lakouda (Gorna Lakavitsa), Mavrohori (Tisovo), Melisomandra (Maloshijtsa), Mesovuni (Siderovo), Milopetra (Mazhdel), Mikroklisura (Dolna Lakavitsa), Mikromilia (Ustitsa), Perasma (Stranen) Pochan, Poliliton (Sarchan, Staredzik), Potami (Borovo), Psihron (Kosten), Shurdilovo, Virsan (Vrashten), Vrahohori (Boren)
  • Sidironero community: Dobryadzil, Evrenes (Pulovo), Kainchen, Kalikarpo (Lovchishta), Kesariano (Ruskovo), Klista (Kolyush), Kokino (Barhovo), Limon (Rashovo), Magnisio (Grazhdel), Oropdeio (Vladikovo), Papades (Popovo selo), Plakostrato (Glum), Sidironero, (Osenitsa), Skaloti (Liban), Stavrodromi (Orhovo), Voskotopi (Verdzhenitsa, Drazhenitsa), Vounohori (Pribojna), Vrahotopos (Kalchovo)

Italics indicates not inhabited settlement as of the 2001 census.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Сребранов, Румен (2007) (in Bulgarian). Чечкият говор. София: Академично издателство „Проф. Марин Дринов“. pp. 12–16. ISBN 978-954-322-230-8. OCLC 262987480. 
  2. ^ Кънчов, Васил (1970) [First published in series from 1894 to 1896]. "Неврокопската каза" (in Bulgarian). Избрани произведения. Том I. Пътуване по долините на Струма, Места и Брегалница. Битолско, Преспа и Охридско (II ed.). София: Издателство “Наука и изкуство”. p. 266. OCLC 174235585. http://www.promacedonia.org/vk_1/vk1_a_19.html. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  3. ^ Кънчов, Васил (1970) [First published in series from 1894 to 1896]. "Неврокопската каза" (in Bulgarian). Избрани произведения. Том I. Пътуване по долините на Струма, Места и Брегалница. Битолско, Преспа и Охридско (II ed.). София: Издателство “Наука и изкуство”. p. 269. OCLC 174235585. http://www.promacedonia.org/vk_1/vk1_a_19.html. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  4. ^ Кънчов, Васил (1996) [First published 1900]. "Неврокопска Каза" (in Bulgarian). Македония. Етнография и статистика (II ed.). София: Академично издателство „Проф. Марин Дринов“. p. 196. ISBN 954430424X. OCLC 164844115. http://www.promacedonia.org/vk/vk_2_21.htm. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 

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