Lower middle class


Lower middle class

In developed nations across the earth, the lower middle class, is a sub-division of the greater middle class which constitutes by far the largest socio-economic class. Universally the term refers to the group of middle class households or individuals who have not attained the status of the upper middle class associated with the higher realms of the middle class, hence the name.

United States

In American society, the middle class may be divided into two or three sub-groups. When divided into two parts, the lower middle class, also sometimes simply referred to as "middle class," consists of roughly one third of households, roughly twice as large as the upper middle class. Common occupation fields are semi-professionals, such as school teachers or accountants, small business owners and skilled craftsmen. These individuals commonly have some college education or perhaps a Bachelor's degree and earn a comfortable living. Already among the largest social classes, rivaled only by the working class, the American lower middle class is diverse and growing.Gilbert, D. (1998). "The American Class Structure". Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.] Thompson, W. & Hickey, J. (2005). "Society in Focus". Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon, Pearson.]

Though, not common in sociological models, the middle class may be divided into three sections in vernacular language usage. In this system the term lower middle class relates to the demographic referred to as working class in most sociological models. Yet, some class models, such as those by sociologist Leonard Beeghley suggest the middle class to be one cohesive socio-economic demographic, including the demographics otherwise referred to as lower, simply middle or upper middle class in one group comprising about 45% of households.Beeghley, L. (2004). "The Structure of Social Stratification in the United States". Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon, Pearson.]

ocial class in the US at a glance

ee also

*Underclass
*Working class
*Middle class
*Upper middle class
*Upper class

References


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • lower-middle-class — ➡ lower middle class * * * …   Universalium

  • lower-middle-class — adj. occupying the lower part of the middle socioeconomic range in a society. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lower middle class — n [sing + sing/pl v] (also the lower middle classes [pl]) n the class of people in British society, especially in the past, between working class and middle class, such as office workers or shopkeepers, but not professional people. Compare… …   Universalium

  • lower-middle-class — adjective occupying the lower part of the middle socioeconomic range in a society (Freq. 4) • Similar to: ↑middle class * * * lower middle class adjective • a lower middle class suburban neighbourhood Main entry: ↑lower middle classderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • lower middle class — noun the lower socio economic bracket of the middle class …   Australian English dictionary

  • (the) lower middle class — the lower middle class [lower middle class the lower middle class] noun [sing+ sing/pl v] (also the lower middle classes [pl]) noun the class of people in British society, especially in the past, between ↑working class and ↑middle class, such as… …   Useful english dictionary

  • lower middle classes — ➡ lower middle class * * * …   Universalium

  • middle class — middle class, middle classes In many ways this is the least satisfactory term which attempts in one phrase to define a class sharing common work and market situations. The middle stratum of industrial societies has expanded so much in the last… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • middle class, the — noun * the social class that consists mostly of educated people who have professional jobs: the upper/lower middle class: She considers herself to be a member of the upper middle class. the growth of the middle classes in the 19th century ─… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Middle class — Sociology …   Wikipedia


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