Delaware Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey


Delaware Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Delaware Township, New Jersey
—  Township  —
Map of Delaware Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Delaware Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°26′34″N 74°57′26″W / 40.44278°N 74.95722°W / 40.44278; -74.95722Coordinates: 40°26′34″N 74°57′26″W / 40.44278°N 74.95722°W / 40.44278; -74.95722
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated April 2, 1838
Government
 – Type Township (New Jersey)
 – Mayor Kenneth J. Novak (2012)
Area
 – Total 37.0 sq mi (95.9 km2)
 – Land 36.7 sq mi (95.2 km2)
 – Water 0.3 sq mi (0.7 km2)
Elevation[1] 338 ft (103 m)
Population (2010)
 – Total 4,563
 – Density 124.3/sq mi (47.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 – Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08557 - Sergeantsville
08559 - Stockton
08822 - Flemington
Area code(s) 609, 908
FIPS code 34-17170[2][3]
GNIS feature ID 0882182[4]
Website http://www.delawaretwpnj.org/

Delaware Township is a Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. Part of the township is on the Hunterdon Plateau, while the southern portions are in the Amwell Valley. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township population was recorded as 4,563. The historic community of Sergeantsville is located within Delaware Township, as is the unincorporated area of Raven Rock. Other villages are Croton, Locktown, Sand Brook, and Rosemont.

Delaware was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 2, 1838, from a portion of a larger municipality then known as Amwell Township (now defunct). Historian and cartographer John P. Snyder has erroneously stated that a referendum was held on that date, but there was in fact no referendum and the people of Amwell knew nothing about the division until after the Legislature passed the bill.[5][6] A portion of the township was taken to form Stockton borough (April 14, 1898).

The township was first settled in the early 18th century by Colonel John Reading (1657–1717), who was instrumental in the creation of Amwell Township in 1708 and also worked for the creation of Hunterdon County in 1714.

The Township of Delaware lies along the Delaware River, which forms the southwestern boundary of Hunterdon County. The Delaware and Raritan Canal parallels the Delaware River along the southern border of the township. The sole remaining historic covered bridge (abutments constructed in 1750; bridge built in 1872) in New Jersey crosses the Wickecheoke Creek between Sergeantsville and Rosemont.[7]

The Township retains much of its rural heritage. Rolling fields and picturesque barns belong to farms that have changed little in the last two hundred years, but it has not been immune to growth. Newly created lots along the road frontage and some small developments have changed the feel of the Township. The village of Sergeantsville is the center of the township, containing the (K-8) elementary school, the Post Office, and the Town Hall. The community was first settled by a Mr. Thatcher about 1740 and was later named for Charles Sergeant, an American Revolutionary War soldier. A tradition in the Township is Sergeantsville's "Thanksgiving in the Country" house tour. Each year participants tour four or five different homes that have historical, architectural or cultural qualities, and proceeds from this fundraising event benefit the Facial Reconstruction Unit of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.[7]

Contents

Geography

The township has a total of 37.1 square miles (96 km2).

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1930 1,704
1940 1,756 3.1%
1950 2,031 15.7%
1960 2,485 22.4%
1970 3,249 30.7%
1980 3,816 17.5%
1990 4,512 18.2%
2000 4,478 −0.8%
2010 4,563 1.9%
Population 1930 - 1990.[8]

As of the census of 2000, there were 4,478 people, 1,643 households, and 1,302 families residing in the township. The population density was 121.9 people per square mile (47.1/km²). There were 1,701 housing units at an average density of 46.3 per square mile (17.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.70% White, 0.40% African American, 0.04% Native American, 1.03% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.14% of the population.

There were 1,643 households out of which 33.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.3% were married couples living together, 4.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.7% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the township the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 32.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 98.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.3 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $80,756, and the median income for a family was $90,842. Males had a median income of $61,701 versus $48,780 for females. The per capita income for the township was $38,285. 3.4% of the population and 2.3% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 1.2% are under the age of 18 and 12.2% are 65 or older.

Government

Local government

Delaware Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[9] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2011, members of the Delaware Township Committee are Mayor Kenneth J. Novak (term ends December 31, 2012), Deputy Mayor Roger Locandro, Jr. (2012), Susan D. Lockwood (2011), Kristin McCarthy (2011) and Donald F. Scholl, Jr. (2013).[7][10]

Federal, state and county representation

Delaware Township is in the 12th Congressional district and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[11] The township was relocated to the 16th state legislative district by the New Jersey Apportionment Commission based on the results of the 2010 Census.[12] The new district is in effect for the June 2011 primary and the November 2011 general election, with the state senator and assembly members elected taking office in the new district as of January 2012.[11]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[13] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

Delaware Township is in the 23rd Legislative District (New Jersey) of the New Jersey Legislature, which is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Oxford Township) and in the New Jersey General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township).[14] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham).[15] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[16]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large, with either one or two seats up for election each year on a staggered basis.[17] As of 2011, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Matt Holt (Clinton Town), Freeholder Deputy Director Robert Walton (Hampton), William Mennen (Tewksbury Township),George B. Melick (Tewksbury Township), and Ronald Sworen (Frenchtown).[18]

Transportation

State and U.S. routes that pass through include Route 12, Route 29 and U.S. Route 202 (including part of the New Hope-Lambertville Toll Bridge).

County routes that traverse the municipality are CR 519, CR 523, CR 579 (which runs along the border between Raritan), and CR 604.

Interstate 78 is outside the township in neighboring Franklin Township.

Education

The Delaware Township School District serves students in grades kindergarten through grade eight, with an enrollment of 510 students in 2005-06.[19] The school is located on a 26 acre site adjacent to the community of Sergeantsville and three miles (5 km) from the Delaware River.

Students in grade 9 - 12 attend the Hunterdon Central High School, part of the Hunterdon Central Regional High School District, which serves almost 3100 students in central Hunterdon County from Delaware Township, East Amwell Township, Flemington Borough, Raritan Township and Readington Township.[20]

Notable residents

Notable current and former residents of Delaware Township include:

References

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Delaware, Geographic Names Information System, accessed January 4, 2008.
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 14, 2008.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ Goodspeed, Marfy. "170 Years Ago, Delaware Twp. in the Midst of a Controversy", Delaware Township Post, March 7, 2008. Accessed March 8, 2008.
  6. ^ Snyder, John P.The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968. Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 154.
  7. ^ a b c Hunterdon County web page for Delaware Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed March 13, 2011.
  8. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed March 1, 2007.
  9. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 103.
  10. ^ Township Committee, Delaware Township. Accessed March 13, 2011.
  11. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters, p. 56. Accessed May 23, 2011.
  12. ^ 2011 Apportionment Redistricting: Municipalities sorted alphabetically, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed August 4, 2011.
  13. ^ Municipalities, Congressman Rush D. Holt, Jr. Accessed June 29, 2008.
  14. ^ "Legislative Roster: 2010-2011 Session". New Jersey Legislature. http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/members/roster.asp. Retrieved 2010-07-25. 
  15. ^ "About the Governor". New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/about/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  16. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/lt/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  17. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  18. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed February 9, 2011.
  19. ^ Data for the Delaware Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed March 9, 2008.
  20. ^ Hunterdon Central Regional High School 2007 Report card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed March 9, 2008. "Located in beautiful, historic Hunterdon County in central New Jersey, Hunterdon Central Regional High School serves the five municipalities of Delaware Township, East Amwell Township, Flemington Borough, Raritan Township, and Readington Township."
  21. ^ "Bucks County Artists" James A. Michener Art Museum. Accessed March 18, 2008.
  22. ^ "Will Cotton, 77, Dead", The New York Times, January 6, 1958. Accessed April 3, 2008.
  23. ^ Waldron, Martin. "Trenton Topics; Byrne Appoints a Judge To Serve as His Counsel", The New York Times, June 29, 1976. Accessed March 13, 2011. "Governor Byrne today named a Superior Court judge, Alan B. Handler of Delaware Township, as his chief legal counsel to replace Lewis B. Kaden."
  24. ^ Johnston, Lyle. "Goodnight, Chet" a Biography of Chet Huntley
  25. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, August 22, 2006. Accessed March 8, 2008.
  26. ^ Adelson, Fred B. "ART; Children's Page Turners to Linger Over", The New York Times, January 9, 2000. Accessed December 9, 2007. "Both Richard Egielski of Milford and John Schoenherr of Delaware Township (near Stockton) are represented by illustrations from books aimed at ages 4 to 8, the youngest group."
  27. ^ "Glenway Wescott, 85, Novelist and Essayist". The New York Times, February 24, 1987. Accessed April 4, 2008.
  28. ^ Wescott, Lloyd Bruce (2002). Our Wescott Family Story. http://books.google.com/books?id=f41YAAAAMAAJ. 
  29. ^ "Entertainers", Time, March 6, 1944. Accessed March 11, 2008.
  30. ^ "Fun Facts about Hunterdon County, New Jersey", Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed March 11, 2008.
  31. ^ "Bucks County Artists", James A. Michener Art Museum. Accessed March 11, 2008.
  32. ^ Strunsky, Steve. "Zimmer Returning To Washington", The New York Times, July 10, 2001. Accessed March 8, 2008.

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