Northern Silk Road


Northern Silk Road
Taklamakan Desert

The Northern Silk Road is a prehistoric trackway in northern China originating in the early capital of Xi'an and extending north of the Taklamakan Desert to reach the ancient kingdoms of Parthia, Bactria and eventually Persia and Rome.[1] It is the northern-most branch of several Silk Roads providing trade, military movements and cultural exchange between China and the west. The use of this route was expanded pursuant to actions by the Han Dynasty in the latter part of the first millennium BC to push back northern tribes and control the safe passage of Chinese troops and merchants.

Contents

Route

The route started at Chang'an (now called Xi'an), the capital of the ancient Chinese Kingdom, which, in the Later Han, was moved further east to Luoyang. The route was defined about the 1st Century BCE as Han Wudi put an end to harassment by nomadic tribes.[citation needed]

The route travels northwest through the Chinese province of Gansu from Shaanxi Province, and splits into three further routes, two of them following the mountain ranges to the north and south of the Taklamakan Desert to rejoin at Kashgar; and the other going north of the Tian Shan mountains through Turpan, Talgar and Almaty (in what is now southeast Kazakhstan).

The routes split west of Kashgar with one branch heading down the Alay Valley towards Termez and Balkh, while the other traveled through Kokand in the Fergana Valley, and then west across the Karakum Desert towards Merv, joining the southern route briefly.

One of the branch routes turned northwest to the north of the Aral and Caspian seas then and on to the Black Sea.

See also

References

  1. ^ Gary K. Young, Rome's Eastern Trade: International Commerce and Imperial Policy, 31 BC - AD 305

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Silk Road — The Silk Road, or Silk Routes, are an extensive interconnected network of trade routes across the Asian continent connecting East, South, and Western Asia with the Mediterranean world, including North Africa and Europe. The so called Silk Routes… …   Wikipedia

  • Silk Road transmission of art — Many artistic influences transited along the Silk Road, especially through the Central Asia, where Hellenistic, Iranian, Indian and Chinese influence were able to intermix. In particular Greco Buddhist art represent one of the most vivid examples …   Wikipedia

  • Cities along the Silk Road — The Silk Roads. Contents 1 Along the continental Silk Road …   Wikipedia

  • road — roadless, adj. roadlessness, n. /rohd/, n. 1. a long, narrow stretch with a smoothed or paved surface, made for traveling by motor vehicle, carriage, etc., between two or more points; street or highway. 2. a way or course: the road to peace. 3. a …   Universalium

  • Northern Areas — Pakistan infobox region = Federally Administered Northern Areas (FANA) capital = Gilgit latd = 35.35 longd = 75.9 pop year = 2008 population = 1,800,000 (Estimate) density km2 = 20.7 area km2 = 72496 languages =Urdu (national) English (official)… …   Wikipedia

  • Silk-Miller police murders — Gary Silk and Rodney Miller The Silk Miller murders (also known as the Moorabbin Police murders) was the name given to the murders of Victoria Police Officers Sergeant Gary Silk and Senior Constable Rodney Miller in Cochranes Road, Moorabbin,… …   Wikipedia

  • Northern Mannerism — Bartholomeus Spranger, Hercules, Deianira and Nessus, 1580 85 Northern Mannerism is the term in European art history for the versions of Mannerism practiced in the visual arts north of the Alps in the 16th and early 17th century …   Wikipedia

  • History of silk — According to Chinese tradition, the history of silk begins in the 27th century BCE. Its use was confined to China until the Silk Road opened at some point during the latter half of the first millennium BC. China maintained its virtual monopoly… …   Wikipedia

  • Royal Road — The Persian Royal Road was an ancient highway reorganized and rebuilt by the Persian king Darius I of Achaemenid Empire in the 5th Century BC. Darius built the road to facilitate rapid communication throughout his very large empire from Susa to… …   Wikipedia

  • Maritime Silk Route Museum — The Maritime Silk Route Museum (Haishang Sichouzhilu Bowuguan simplified Chinese: 海上丝绸博物院) is the name of a museum on Hailing Island, Yangjiang, Guangdong Province, China. Work on the museum started in late 2004 and the museum opened to the… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.