List of Renaissance composers


List of Renaissance composers

This is a list of composers active during the Renaissance period of European history. Since the 14th century is not usually considered by music historians to be part of the musical Renaissance, but part of the Middle Ages, composers active during that time can be found in the List of Medieval composers. Composers on this list had some period of significant activity after 1400, before 1600, or in a few cases they wrote music in a Renaissance idiom in the several decades after 1600.

Timeline

Burgundian

The "Burgundian School" is a term used to denote a group of composers active in the 15th century in what is now northern and eastern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, centered on the court of the Dukes of Burgundy. The school also included some English composers at the time when part of modern France was controlled by England. The "Burgundian School" was the first phase of activity of the Franco-Flemish School, the central musical practice of the Renaissance in Europe.

*Johannes Tapissier (c. 1370 – before 1410) Also known as "Jean de Noyers"
*Nicolas Grenon (c. 1375 – 1456)
*John Dunstaple (c. 1380 – 1453) Native to England
*Pierre Fontaine (c. 1380 – c. 1450)
*Guillaume Legrant (fl. 1405 – 1449) Also known as "Lemarcherier"
*Jacobus Vide (fl. 1405 – 1433)
*Guillaume Dufay (? 1397 – 1474)
*Gilles Binchois (c. 1400 – 1460)
*Johannes Brassart (c. 1400 – 1455)
*Johannes Legrant (fl.c. 1420 – 1440)
*Reginaldus Libert (fl.c. 1425 – 1435)
*Arnold de Lantins (fl.c. 1430)
*Hugo de Lantins (fl.c. 1430)
*Gilles Joye (c. 1424/5 – 1483)
*Guillaume Le Rouge (fl. 1450 – 1465)
*Antoine Busnois (c. 1430 – 1492)
*Robert Morton (c. 1430 – after 1475)
*Adrien Basin (fl. 1457 – 1476)
*Hayne van Ghizeghem (c. 1445 – c. 1480)

English

Due in part to its isolation from mainland Europe, the English Renaissance began later than in some other parts of Europe. The Renaissance style also continued into a period in which many other European nations had already made the transition into the Baroque. While late medieval English music was influential on the development of the Burgundian style, most English music of the 15th century was lost, particularly during the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the time of Henry VIII. The Tudor period of the 16th century was a time of intense interest in music, and Renaissance styles began to develop with mutual influence from the mainland. Some English musical trends were heavily indebted to foreign styles, for example the English Madrigal School; others had aspects of continental practice as well as uniquely English traits. Composers included Thomas Tallis, John Dowland, Orlando Gibbons and William Byrd.

1370–1450

*Leonel Power (c. 1370 to 1385 – 1445)
*Roy Henry (fl.c. 1410) Very likely Henry V of England (1387 – 1422)
*Byttering (fl.c. 1400 – 1420) Possibly "Thomas Byttering"
*John Plummer (c. 1410 – c. 1483)
*Walter Frye (fl.c. 1450 – 1475)
*John Tuder (15th cent.) Represented in the Pepys MS by a "Gloria laus et honor (à 3)", and a setting of the "Lamentations", which is the most impressive of the monophonic pieces in the MS
*John Treloff (15th cent.) Represented in the Ritson MS, notably by three three-part settings of "Nesciens mater"
*William Cornysh (c. ? 1430 – 1502)
*William Horwood (c. 1430 – 1484) He is known by four pieces in the Eton Choirbook (one is incomplete) and another incomplete piece in a York MS
*John Hothby (d. 1487) Also known as "Johannes Ottobi". Travelled Europe and was active in Italy and England
*Sir William Hawte (fl. 1460 – 1470) "Benedicamus" setting in Pepys MS; "Stella coeli" in Ritson MS
*Richard Hygons (c. 1435 – c. 1509)
*Hugh Kellyk His five-part Magnificat and his cleverly managed seven-part "Gaude flore virginali" appear to be among the earlier pieces in the Eton Choirbook
*John Nesbett (d. 1488) Nesbett is represented in the Eton Choirbook only by a Magnificat, one of the most attractive settings surviving.
*Thomas Pykke (15th cent.) Also spelt "Packe". Represented in the Ritson MS notably by two Masses, "Rex summe" and "Gaudete in Domino", two five-part settings, of the antiphon "Lumen ad revalationem" and of the words "Te Dominum confitemur" from the Te Deum and a "Gaude sancta Magdalen"
*Gilbert Banester (c. 1445 – 1487)
*Edmund Turges (c. 1445 – after ? 1501) Also spelt "Sturges"
*Henry Petyr (fl. ? 1470 – ? 1516) Also spelt "Petre", "Peter". Represented in the Ritson MS by a Mass without Kyrie
*Richard Mower (15th cent.) Represented in the Ritson MS by a "Beata Dei genitrix" and a "Regina coeli"
*Henry Prentes (d. 1514) Also spelt "Prentyce". Represented by one work in the Caius Choirbook, a Magnificat that is actually a reworking of William Cornysh's setting in the same collection

1451–1500

*Walter Lambe (c. 1450 – after 1504). Major contributor to the Eton Choirbook
*Robert Wilkinson (c. 1450/1 – 1515 or later) Also spelt "Wylkynson"
*John Browne (fl.c. 1490) Likely b. 1453. Major contributor to the Eton Choirbook
*William Corbronde (fl. 1480 – 1500) Represented in the Pepys manuscript
*Robert Fayrfax (1464 – 1521) Also spelt "Fairfax", "Fairfaux", "Feyrefax"
*Richard Davy (c. 1465 – c. 1507) Major contributor to the Eton Choirbook
*William Cornysh (ca. 1468 – 1523) Probably the son of William Cornysh
*Richard Sampson (c. 1470 – 1554)
*Hacomplaynt (fl. late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) Also spelt "Hacomblene". He has a single work, a setting of "Salve regina", in the Eton Choirbook
*Avery Burton (c. 1474 – 1542 to 1547) Also spelt "Avere", "Burnet"
*John Norman (fl. 1502 to 22) Composed a 5-part Mass "Resurrexit Dominus", found in the Forrest-Heyther partbooks, on an Easter plainsong; and a 3-part "Miserere Mihi" in the Ritson manuscript that is much more elaborate, somewhat resembling John Taverner's responds
*William Rasor (fl. 1499 – 1514/5) Also spelt "Rasar". His output includes English and Latin church music. Composed a Mass found in the Forrest-Heyther partbooks
*Thomas Ashewell (c. 1478 – after 1518) Also spelt "Ashwelle", "Asshwell", "Aswell"
*Thomas Sternhold (d. 1549) Psalmist.
*John Strabridge (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work, a "Dum transisset", in the Christchurch partbooks
*Christopher Hoskins (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work, a "Speciosa facta es", in the Gyffard partbooks
*William, Monk of Stratford Stratford has a single work, a four-part Magnificat, in the Eton Choirbook. Nothing more is known
*Hugh Aston (c. 1485 – 1558) Also spelt "Ashton", "Assheton"
*Richard Bramston (? 1485 – 1554) Represented in the Peterhouse and Gyffard partbooks
*Nicholas Ludford (c. 1485 – 1557)
*John Mason (? 1485 – ? 1547) Four works survive, featured in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Richard Pygott (c. 1485 – 1549) Also spelt "Pigott". There are two works by Pygott in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Edmund Sturton (fl. late 15th – early 16th cent.) Presumably identical with the Sturton who composed the six-part "Ave Maria ancilla Trinitatis" in the Lambeth choirbook, he contributed a "Gaude virgo mater Christi" to the Eton Choirbook, the six voices of which cover a fifteen-note range
*John Redford (c. 1486 – 1547) One of the main contributors to The Mulliner Book
*Nicholas Huchyn (fl. late 15th – early 16th cent.) A single work, a setting of "Salve regina" in the Eton Choirbook
*John Fawkyner (fl. late 15th cent.) Featured in the Eton Choirbook
*William Pasche (fl. late 15th – early 16th cent.) Also spelt "Pashe". Represented by a "Christus resurgens Mass", written on a Sarum chant, two "Magnificat"s, and a motet, "Sancta Maria"
*Robert Cooper (14?? – 15??) A work in the Gyffard partbooks and a manuscript ("MS 31922")
*Thomas Appleby (c. 1488 – 1563)
*John Taverner (c. 1490 – 1545)
*William Whytbroke (fl. 1520 – 1530) Surviving music includes a four-part Mass apon ye Square, in the Gyffard partbooks
*Henry VIII of England (1491 – 1547)
*John Dark (? 1495 – ? 1569) Also spelt "Darke". Represented by a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Robert Jones (fl. 1520 to 1538) Contributed a Mass and Magnificat to the Peterhouse partbooks, and songs to Wynkyn de Worde's songbook of 1530
*Thomas Preston (d.c. 1563) Composed 12 "Offertory" settings for keyboard, including the popular "Felix namque", and an "alternatim" organ Mass for Easter, containing the only known sequence setting of the time. His keyboard writing is extremely virtuosic for the period

1501–1550

*Hyett (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
*John Ensdale (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
*John Hake (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
*Walter Erly (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Arthur Chamberlain (early 16th cent.) Also spelt "Chamberlayne". Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
*John Ambrose (fl. 1520 to 1545) Few pieces survive
*John Merbecke (c. 1505 – c. 1585) Best remembered for re-setting many Latin prayer texts to English. Surviving works include a "Missa Per arma iustitie"
*William Shelby (? – 1570) Also spelt "Shelbye", "Selby", "Selbie", "Selbye". Two liturgical keyboard pieces, a "Miserere" and "Felix namque", survive in The Mulliner Book
*Robert Okeland (fl. before 1548) Also spelt "Hockland", "Ockland". Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
*Thomas Tallis (c. 1505 – 1585)
*Christopher Tye (c. 1505 – ? 1572)
*John Wood (fl. 1530) He is represented by a single work, an "Exsurge Domine et dissipentur inimici", in the Christchurch partbooks
*John Marbeck (c. 1510 – c. 1585) Almost burnt as a heretic in 1543. Produced the first musical setting for the English liturgy, publishing "The Booke of Common Praier Noted" 1549
*Osbert Parsley (1511 – 1585) Also spelt "Parsely" Wrote a set of "Lamentations" for Holy Week

*E. Strowger (fl. early 16th cent.) Only a single piece for keyboard, a "Miserere" in a British Museum MS, can be attributed to him
*Thomas Knyght (fl. 1530 to 1535) Presumably also spelt "Knight". Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks, and three works in the Gyffard partbooks
*Philip Alcocke (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
*John Sheppard (c. 1515 – 1559)
*John Thorne (d. 1573) "Exsultabunt sancti" in a British Museum MS
*Kyrton (fl. 1540 to 1550) Miserere for keyboard in a British Museum MS
*John Black (c. 1520 – 1587)
*Thomas Caustun (c. 1520 to 25 – 1569) Also spelt "Causton"
*Richard Wynslate (d. 1572) Also spelt "Wynslade". His keyboard piece "Lucem tuamis" in a British Museum MS
*Henry Stenings (fl. before 1548 – after 1600) Also spelt "Stonninge", "Stoninge", "Stoninges", "Stoning", "Stonings". Surviving consort works on MS are three five-part works - a "Miserere", a "Browning" and an "In Nomine" - and a simpler, four-part "In Nomine". A four-part Latin "Magnificat" is found in the Giffard partbooks
*Richard Allwood (fl.c. 1550 – 1570) Also spelt "Alwood"
*Richard Edwards (1525 – 1566) Also spelt "Edwardes"
*Hugh Sturmys (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Thomas Wright (16th cent.) Also spelt "Wrighte". He is represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks, a "Nesciens mater"
*William Mundy (c. 1528 – before 1591) Father of John Mundy His output includes fine examples of both the large-scale Latin votive antiphon and the short English anthem, as well as Masses and Latin psalm settings; his style is vigorous and eloquent. He is represented in the Mulliner Book
*Robert Parsons (c. 1535 – 1572) Latin music includes "antiphons", "Credo quod redemptor", "Domine quis habitabit", "Magnificat" and "Jam Christus astra". Also three "responds" from the Office of the Dead, songs (including "Pandolpho"), "In nomine" settings for ensemble, and a "galliard".
*Thomas Whythorne (1528 – 1595)
*John Heath (16th cent.) Contributed a Morning and Communion Service to Day's "Certaine Notes", of 1560. Probably the composer of a "Christe qui lux" for keyboard in MS, ascribed to 'Heath'
*Clement Woodcock (1540 – 1590) Also spelt "Woodcoke", "Woodecock". His "Browning my dear" is one of several pieces of the period based on a popular tune, also known as "The leaves be green"
*John Cuk (16th cent.) An extant mass on "Venit dilectus meus" in the "York MS"
*Robert White (1538 – 1574) Also spelt "Whyte"
*William Byrd (1543 – 1623)
*Richard Hunt (16th cent.) Has two works in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Alfonso Ferrabosco the Eldar (1543 – 1588) Also spelt "Alphonso", "Farrabosco", "Ferabosco", "Forobosco". Also known as "Master Alfonso" and "Alfonso Ferrabosco the Elder"
*Anthony Holborne (c. 1545 – 1602) Also known as "Olborner"
*John Johnson (c. 1545 – 1594)
*Thomas Woodson (d. ? 1605) "Forty Wayes of 2 pts. in one" is found in a British Museum MS, canonic settings of "Miserere"
*Thomas Warrock (fl. 1580 – 1590) Also spelt "Warrocke", "Warwick". Two pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, Nos. 97-8
*John Baldwin (before 1560 – 1615)
*John Cosyn (d. 1609) Published "Musicke of six, and five partes" in 1585
*Edward Martyn (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
*John Northbrooke (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
*Picforth (fl.c. 1580) An "In nomine" survives in MS, unusual in that each instrumental part consists of note sof only one time-value throughout, the values differing in each of the five parts
*Poynt (fl.c. 1580) Works survive in manuscript
*Thomas Oldfield (?) His "Praeludium" is No. 49 in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
*Jehan Oystermayre (?) Almost certainly German origin. Represented in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book

1551–1570

*John Marchant (? – 1611) There survive a Pavan in a Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge MS, an "Allemanda" in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, No. 187; "The Marchants Dream" in a MS in the British Museum, and a "Pavan" and "Galliard" in another British Museum MS.
*Richard Martin (fl.c. 1610) His only surviving song "Change they mind since she doth change" was included in Robert Dowland's "A Musicall Banquet" of 1610
*Thomas Fardyng (16th cent.) Three rounds in a British Museum MS ("MS 31922")
*Edward Collard (d.c. 1600?)
*Edmund Hooper (ca. 1553 – 1621) Also spelt "Hoop". He contributed to Michael East's "psalter" and William Leighton's "Teares", and wrote some intensely expressive anthems. He has two keyboard pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
*Elway Bevin (1554 – 1638) Possibly Welsh
*William Inglot (1554 – 1621) Also spelt "Inglott". Two keyboard pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book; there is also an untitled keyboard piece by 'Englitt' in a MS in the British Museum
*John Mundy (c. 1555 – 1630) Son of William Mundy. Published a volume of "Songs and Psalms" in 1594, contributed to the "Triumphs of Oriana", composed English and Latin sacred music, and is represented with five pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. His "Goe from my window" variations are a particularly fine example of the genre
*Thomas Morley (1557 – 1603)
*Nathaniel Giles (c. 1558 – 1634) Also spelt "Gyles"
*Matthew Jeffries (c. 1558 – c. 1615)
*Ferdinando Richardson (? 1558 – 1618) Also known as "Sir Ferdinando Heybourne". There survives a keyboard "Pavan" and "Galliard", each with variation, in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
*Michael Cavendish (c. 1565 – 1628)
*Richard Carlton (c. 1558 – ? 1638)
*William Brade (1560 – 1630) Active in Denmark and Germany
*William Cobbold (1560 – 1639)
*James Harding (ca. 1560 – 1626) Also spelt "Jeames Harden". Two keyboard fantasias, possibly arrangements, in a British Museum MS; a setting by William Byrd of a "Gagliarda" in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. "Galiard" by 'Mr. James' in Berlin State Library
*William Leighton (c.1560 – before 1617)
*Peter Philips (1560 – 1628) Exiled to Flanders
*Thomas Robinson (c. 1560 – after 1609)
*Robert Hales (fl. 1583 – 1616) His only surviving song "O Eyes, leave off your weeping" was included in Robert Dowland's "A Musicall Banquet" of 1610.
*John Bull (1562 – 1628) Exiled to the Netherlands
*John Dowland (1563 – 1626)
*Giles Farnaby (c. 1563 – 1640)
*John Milton (c. 1563 – 1647) Father of the poet John Milton. Composed madrigals, one of which was printed in "The Triumphs of Oriana", as well as anthems, Psalm settings, a motet, and some consort music including a 6-part In nomine
*John Danyel (1564 – after 1625) Also spelt "Danyell"
*Edward Johnson (fl. 1592/4) Contributed to Michael East's "psalter" and "The Triumphs of Oriana" and more
*Mallory (fl.c. 1580) Works survive in MS
*Michael Cavendish (c. 1565 – 1628)
*John Farmer (c. 1565 – 1605)
*George Kirbye (c. 1565 – 1634)
*Thomas Campion (1567 – 1620) Also spelt "Campian". The only English composer to experiment with musique mesurée and the first to imitate the Florentine monodists
*John Hilton (d. 1608) Probably father of John Hilton
*Edward Gibbons (1568 – c. 1650) Brother of Orlando Gibbons
*Richard Gibbs (1568 – c. 1650) Also known as "R. Gibbs". 'Allmaine' and 'Corant' in a Christ Church, Oxford MS
*Philip Rosseter (c. 1568 – 1623)
*Tobias Hume (c. 1569 – 1645) Responsible for the earliest known use of col legno in Western music
*Nicholas Strogers (fl. 1560 – 1575) Also spelt "Strowger", "Strowgers". Three (probably four) keyboard pieces in a Christ Church, Oxford, manuscipt, and a "Fantasia" in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book (No. 89); an "In nomine" exists in a Bodleian manuscript
*Edward Blancks (fl.c. 1590 – 1620) Also spelt "Blanke", "Blanks", "Blanckes"
*Thomas Bateson (c. 1570 – 1630)
*John Bennet (c. 1570 – after 1614)
*John Cooper (c. 1570 – 1626) Also spelt "Coperario", "Coprario"
*Benjamin Cosyn (c. 1570 – 1652 or later) Also spelt "Cosin", "Cosens". Compiler of the manuscript "Cosyn's Virginal Book"
*Francis Cutting (fl. 1595)
*Francis Pilkington (c. 1570 – 1638) Lutenist
*William Tisdale (b. 1570) Also spelt "Tisdall"
*Henry Lichfild (d. 1613) Madrigalist

1571–1580

*Thomas Lupo (1571 – 1627) Also known as "Thomas Lupo The Elder". Composer of several works, but solid attribution of many works to him or another of his relatives is difficult
*John Ward (1571 – 1638)
*Daniel Bacheler (1572 – 1618)
*Alfonso Ferrabosco the younger (c. 1572 – 1628) Illegitimate son of Alfonso Ferrabosco the eldar
*Martin Peerson (1572 – 1650) May be the same person as "Martin Pearson". Four keyboard pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. Many works also published
*Thomas Tomkins (1572 – 1656)
*Ellis Gibbons (1573 – 1603) Brother of Orlando Gibbons
*John Wilbye (1574 – 1638)
*John Bartlet (fl. 1606 to 1610)
*John Bennet (c. 1575 – after 1614)
*John Coprario (c. 1575 – 1626)
*William Simmes (c. 1575 – c. 1625)
*John Holmes (d. 1629) His church music is of considerable interest, fragmentary though it is
*John Cornysh (late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) Probably a relative of William Cornysh
*William Holborne (fl. 1597)
*Thomas Greaves (fl.c. 1600)
*John Maynard (c. 1576/7 – between 1614 and 1633) Primarily known from one published work, "The XIII Wonders of the World", published in London in 1611. It contains twelve songs, six duets for lute and viol. and seven pieces for lyra viol with optional bass viol.
*Thomas Weelkes (1576 – 1623)
*Richard Sumarte (d. after 1630)
*Henry Lichfild (fl. 1613 – after 1620)
*Robert Jones (c. 1577 – after 1615) Published five volumes of simple and melodious lute songs, and one of madrigals
*John Amner (1579 – 1641)
*Michael East (c. 1580 – c. 1648)
*Thomas Hunt (fl. 1600)
*Robert Hall (? – ?) 16th and/or 17th century. Five keyboard pieces extant in the MS "Priscilla Bunbury's Virginal Book"
*John Hampton (fl. late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) He has a single work, a setting of "Salve regina", in the Eton Choirbook
*Richard Dering (c. 1580 – 1630)
*Michael East (c. 1580 – 1648) Probably the son of Thomas East
*Thomas Ford (c. 1580 – 1648)
*Richard Nicholson (d. 1639) Composed English and Latin church music, and consort songs, in humorous rather than melancholy vein, and contributed to "The Triumphs of Oriana"
*Thomas Vautor (b.c. 1580/90) Published a volume of five and six part madrigals in 1619. His best-known piece is "Sweet Suffolk Owl"
*Henry Youll (b.c. 1580/90) His "Canzonets to Three Voyces", although clearly the work of an amateur, have charm and individuality
*George Handford (fl.c. 1609) Book of "Ayresin" MS bears a dedication to Prince Henry dated 1609, but was never published

1581–1611

*Robert Tailour (fl. 1615) Possibly "Robert Taylor", also spelt "Tailer", "Taler", "Taylour". Published "Sacred Hymns, consisting of Fiftie select Psalms" in 1615
*Robert Johnson (c. 1582 – 1633)
*Thomas Simpson (1582 – c. 1628) Also spelt "Sympson". Active in Denmark
*Orlando Gibbons (1583 – 1625)
*Charles Coleman (d. 1646)
*William Corkine (fl. 1610 – 1617)
*George Mason (fl. 1611 to 1618) Published (with John Earsden) "The Ayres That Were Sung And Played, at Brougham Castle in Westmerland, in the Kings Entertainment..." 1618. This included some of the few masque songs that survive from the period immediately after 1613
*Robert Ramsey (d. 1644) Composed mythological and biblical dialogues, such as "Dives and Abraham", "Saul and the Witch of Endor", and "Orpheus and Pluto"
*John Adson (1587 – 1640)
*John Lugg (? 1587 – 165?) Also spelt "Lugge". There survive nine plainsong settings, one hexachord, and three voluntaries for double organ in a Christ Church autograph MS, among others
*Nicholas Lanier (1588 – 1666) Also spelt "Lanière"
*Walter Porter (c. 1588 – 1659) Madrigalist. Publications include instrumental toccatas, sinfonias and ritornellos as well as vocal pieces
*John Tomkins (1589 – 1638) Half brother of Thomas Tomkins. "John come kiss me now" (variations) survives in a British Museum MS
*Richard Mico (1590 – 1661) Two 18th century arrangements for viols of keyboard pavans in a MS in the British Museum survive
*Thomas Ravenscroft (c. 1590 – c. 1633) Published a book of psalms amongst others
*Leonard Woodson (d. 1641) His "Mall Sims" survives in a Berlin State Library MS
*Robert Dowland (1591 – 1641) Son of John Dowland. Only three works are definitely ascribed to him: two lute pieces in the 'Varietie of Lute Lessons' and one in the 'Margaret Board Lutebook'.
*John Jenkins (1592 – 1678)
*Robert Creighton (1593 – 1674) Also spelt "Creyghton" Probably compiler of the manuscript "Rés 1186", which includes several compositions signed "R. Cr."
*Maurice Webster (fl. 1621–36) Also spelt "Morris". Active in north-west Germany. Composer for the viol
*William Cranford (late 16th cent. – 1650 to 75) Also spelt "Cranforth"
*Richard Farnaby (c. 1594 – 1623) Active in Germany. Four keyboard pieces extant in MS
*John Wilson (1595 – 1674) Song writer
*Thomas Holmes (d. 1638) Son of John Holmes. A keyboard piece, "Saraband" in a Christ Church MS; also possibly a piece called "Puddinge" by 'T.H.'
*Henry Lawes (1596 – 1662) Brother of William Lawes. Prolific song writer, leaving over 430
*Hugh Facy (fl. 1618) Eleven keyboard pieces in a MS in the New York Public Library, four pieces in other MS sources
*John Hilton (1599 – 1657) Probably son of John Hilton
*Simon Ives (1600 – 1662) Also spelt "Yves". Some songs to his credit. Two keyboard pieces in a MS in the British Museum
*Stephen Nau (c. 1600 – 1661) Also spelt "Etienne", "Naw", "Noe". A "pavan", "galliards", "allemandes", "courantes" and a "saraband" by him are extant in MS, as is a five-part 'ballet'. Some dances ascribed to "Noë" may be Naudé's work
*William Webb (c. 1600 – after 1656) Song and partsong writer
*Richard Portman (d. 1659) A keyboard "Sarabrand" in a Christ Church, Oxford MS and a "Double Voluntary" in a Wimborne Minster Library, MS
*William Lawes (1602 – 1645) Brother of Henry Lawes
*Randall Jewett (c. 1603 – 1675) Three keyboard pieces in 'Priscilla Bunbury's Book'
*Arthur Phillips (1605 – 1695) A keyboard work, "Ground" survives in a 1548 MS in the British Museum. Although this work is possibly by Thomas Tomkins, this ascription, found only in the index, is doubtful
*Christopher Simpson (c. 1605 – 1669) Also spelt "Sympson". Specialised in composition for the viol
*William Child (1606 – 1697) Also spelt "Chyld"
*Alfonso Ferrabosco (c. 1610 – 1662) Son of Alfonso Ferrabosco the younger
*Edward Lowe (? 1610 – 1682)
*William Slatyer (fl. 1635) Published "Psalmes, or songs of Sion" 1635
*Henry Ferrabosco (c. 1615 – 1658) Son of Alfonso Ferrabosco (II), brother of Alfonso Ferrabosco (III)
*John Ferabosco (1626 – 1682) Also spelt "Ferrabosco". A keyboard suite extant in MS; also an Evening Service, and an anthem, "By the Waters of Babylon".

Franco-Flemish

The Franco-Flemish School refers, somewhat imprecisely, to the style of polyphonic vocal music composition in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. See Renaissance music for a more detailed description of the style. The composers of this time and place, and the music they produced, are also known as the "Dutch School". As the country borders in this period can not be compared with any national borders today, the term "Dutch" may be confusing. Few of these musicians originated in what is now the Netherlands. Instead, the word "Dutch" refers to the Low Countries, roughly corresponding to modern Belgium, northern France and the Netherlands. Most artists were born in Hainaut, Flanders and Brabant.

1370–1450

*Johannes de Limburgia (fl. 1408 – 1430) Also spelt "Lymburgia"; also called "Johannes Vinandi"
*Clement Liebert (fl. 1433 – 1454)
*Johannes Ockeghem (c. 1415 – 1497)
*Johannes Regis (c. 1425 – c. 1496)
*Johannes Tinctoris (c. 1435 – 1511)
*Alexander Agricola (? 1446 – 1506)
*Johannes Martini (c. 1440 – 1497/98)
*Petrus de Domarto (fl.c. 1445 – 1455)
*Johannes de Stokem (c. 1445 – 1487 or 1501)
*Gaspar van Weerbeke (c. 1445 – after 1517)
*Johannes Pullois (d. 1478) Active in the Low Countries and Italy
*Heinrich Isaac (c. 1450 – 1517)
*Josquin des Prez (c. 1450 – 1521)
*Matthaeus Pipelare (c. 1450 – c. 1515)
*Abertijne Malcourt (d. before 1519)

1451–1500

*Philip van Wilder (d. ? 1557) Active in England
*Jean Japart (fl.c. 1474–1481) Active in Italy
*Jacob Obrecht (c. 1453 – 1505)
*Jacobus Barbireau (1455 – 1491)
*Nycasius de Clibano (fl. 1457 – 1497)
*Jheronimus de Clibano (c. 1459 – 1503)
*Pierre de La Rue (c. 1460 – 1518) Most famous composer of the "Grande chapelle" of the Habsburg court
*Marbrianus de Orto (c. 1460 – 1529)
*Antonius Divitis (c. 1470 – c. 1530)
*Johannes Ghiselin (fl. 1491 – 1507)
*Nicolas Champion (c. 1475 – 1533)
*Jacotin (d. 1529) Also called "Jacob Godebrye"
*Noel Bauldeweyn (c. 1480 – after 1513)
*Jean Richafort (c. 1480 – 1547)
*Benedictus Appenzeller (1480 to 1488 – after 1558) Served Mary of Hungary for most of his career
*Pierre Moulu (c. 1485 – c. 1550) Active in France
*Pierre Passereau (fl. 1509 – 1547) popular composer of chansons in the 1530s
*Thomas Crecquillon (c. 1490 – ? 1557) member of Charles V's imperial chapel
*Adrian Willaert (c. 1490 – 1562) Founder of the Venetian School; active in Italy; influential as a teacher as well as a composer
*Lupus Hellinck (c. 1494 – 1541)
*Nicolas Gombert (c. 1495 – c. 1560) Prominent contrapuntist of generation after Josquin; worked for Charles V
*Adrianus Petit Coclico (1499/1500 – after 1562)

1501–1550

*Gilles Reingot (fl. early 16th cent.)
*Arnold von Bruck (c. 1500 – 1554) Especially active in German-speaking areas during the early Reformation period
*Jacques Buus (c. 1500 – 1565) Active at Venice, and assisted in the development of the instrumental ricercar
*Tielman Susato (c. 1500 – c. 1562) Also spelt "Tylman"; was also an influential music publisher
*Jheronimus Vinders (fl. 1525 – 1526) active at Ghent; influenced by Josquin
*Jacques Arcadelt (? 1505 – 1568) Most famous of the early madrigalists
*Jacquet de Berchem (c. 1505 – before 1567) Early madrigalist
*Cornelius Canis (c. 1500 to 1510 – 1561) Music director for Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, in the 1540s and 1550s, after Nicolas Gombert
*Johannes Lupi (c. 1506 – 1539)
*Jacob Clemens non Papa (c. 1510 – c. 1555/6) Also known as "Jacques Clément"
*Ghiselin Danckerts (c. 1510 – c. 1565) Active in Rome
*Pierre de Manchicourt (c. 1510 – 1564) Active in Spain
*Jan Nasco (c. 1510 – 1561) Active in northern Italy
*Dominique Phinot (c. 1510 – c. 1556) Active in Italy and southern France
*Nicolas Payen (c. 1512 – c. 1559) "Maestro di capilla" for Philip II of Spain after Cornelius Canis
*Hubert Naich (c. 1513 – c. 1546) Active in Rome
*Cypriano de Rore (c. 1515 – 1565)
*Hubert Waelrant (c. 1517 – 1595)
*Perissone Cambio (c. 1520 – c. 1562) Minor Venetian madrigalist acquainted with Adrian Willaert
*Séverin Cornet (c. 1520 – 1582)
*Philippe de Monte (1521 – 1603) Prolific composer of madrigals
*Simon Moreau (fl. 1553 – 1558)
*Jacobus Vaet (c. 1529 – 1567)
*Orlande de Lassus (c. 1531 – 1594) Also known as "Orlando di Lasso"
*Jacobus de Kerle (1531/2 – 1591)
*Giaches de Wert (1535 – 1596) Active in Italy
*Johannes Matelart (before 1538 – 1607) Active in the Low Countries, Germany and Italy
*Jhan Gero (fl. 1540 – 1555) Active in Venice, Italy
*Andreas Pevernage (1542/3 – 1591)
*George de La Hèle (1547 – 1586) Active in the Habsburg chapels of Spain and the Low Countries
*Giovanni de Macque (c. 1549 – 1614) Active in Italy

1551–1574

*Rinaldo del Mel (c. 1554 – c. 1598) Active in Italy
*Philippe Rogier (c. 1561 – 1596) Active in Spain
*Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562 – 1621)
*Cornelis Verdonck (1563 – 1625)
*Géry de Ghersem (1573/5 – 1630) Active in Spain and the Netherlands
*Claudio Pari (1574 – after 1619) Active in Italy

French

France here does not refer to the France of today, but a smaller region of French-speaking people separate from the area controlled by the Duchy of Burgundy. In medieval times, France was the centre of musical development with the Notre Dame school and Ars nova, this was later surpassed by the Burgundian School, but France remained a leading producer of choral music throughout the Renaissance.

1370–1450

*Baude Cordier
*Richard Loqueville (d. 1418)
*Pycard (fl.c. 1410)
*Beltrame Feragut (c. 1385 – c. 1450) Also known as "Bertrand di Vignone"
*Johannes Cesaris (fl.c. 1406 – 1417)
*Estienne Grossin (fl. 1418 – 1421)
*Johannes Fedé (c. 1415 – ? 1477)
*Eloy d'Amerval (fl. 1455 – 1508)
*Firminus Caron (fl.c. 1460 – c. 1475)
*Guillaume Faugues (fl.c. 1460 – 1475)
*Philippe Basiron (c. 1449 – 1491)
*Loyset Compère (c. 1450 – 1518)
*Gilles Mureau (c. 1450 – 1512)
*Jehan Fresneau (fl. 1468 – 1505)

1451–1500

*Jean Mouton (c. 1459 – 1522)
*Antoine Brumel (1460 – after 1520)
*Colinet de Lannoy (d. before 1497)
*Carpentras (c. 1470 – 1548)
*Antoine de Févin (c. 1470 – 1511/12) Brother of Robert de Févin
*Pierrequin de Thérache (c. 1470 – 1528) active in Lorraine
*Jean Braconnier (d. 1512)
*Philippe Verdelot (c. 1475 – before 1552) Active in Italy
*Ninot le Petit (fl.c. 1500 – 1520)
*Antoine de Longueval (fl. 1498 – 1525)
*Nicolle des Celliers de Hesdin (d. 1538)
*Jean l'Héritier (1480 – 1552) Also spelt "Heretier", "Lhéritier", "Lirithier"
*Jacquet of Mantua (1483 – 1559)
*Clément Janequin (c. 1485 – 1558)
*Sandrin (c. 1490 – c. 1560) Also known as "Pierre Regnault"
*Claudin de Sermisy (c. 1490 – 1562)
*Jean Conseil (c. 1498 – 1534) Active in Italy
*Robert de Févin (fl. late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) Brother of Antoine de Févin

1501–1550

*Mathieu Gascongne (fl. early 16th cent.)
*Garnier (fl. 1538 – 1542)
*Firmin Lebel (early 16th cent. – 1573) Active in Rome
*Hilaire Penet (? 1501 – 15??)
*Guillaume Le Heurteur (fl. 1530 – 1545)
*Loys Bourgeois (c. 1510 – 1560) Also spelt "Louis"
*Claude Goudimel (c. 1510 – 1572)
*Jean Maillard (c. 1510 – c. 1570)
*Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558)
*Pierre Clereau (d. before 1570)
*Pierre Cadéac (fl. 1538 – 1556)
*Pierre Certon (c. 1510 to 1520 – 1572)
*Jacques Du Pont (c. 1510 – after 1546) Madrigalist active in Italy
*Godard (fl. 1536 – 1560) Possibly "Robert Godard", an organist at Beauvais Cathedral
*Claude Gervaise (fl. 1540 – 1560)
*Jean Guyot de Châtelet (c. 1512 – 1588)
*Didier Lupi Second (c. 1520 – after 1559)
*Adrian Le Roy (c. 1520 – 1598)
*Simon Boyleau (fl. c. 1544 – 1586) active in Milan and Turin
*Guillaume Boni (c. 1530 – 1594)
*Guillaume Costeley (1530 – 1606)
*Nicolas de La Grotte (1530 – c. 1600)
*Claude Le Jeune (1530 – 1600)
*Antoine de Bertrand (c. 1530/40 – c. 1581)
*Joachim Thibault de Courville (d. 1581)
*Paschal de l'Estocart (? 1539 – after 1584)
*Eustache Du Caurroy (1549 – 1609)
*Charles Tessier (b.c. 1550) Active in England and Germany
*Nicolas Millot (d. after 1589)

1551–1557

*Fabrice Caietain (fl. 1570 – 1578)
*Jacques Champion de Chambonnières (before 1555 – 1642)
*Jacques Mauduit (1557 – 1627)
*Julien Perrichon (1566 – c.1600) Also a lutenist.

German

1370–1500

*Oswald von Wolkenstein (1376-7 - 1445)
*Conrad Paumann (c. 1410 – 1473)
*Heinrich Finck (1444/5 – 1527)
*Hans Judenkönig (c. 1450 – 1526) Also spelt "Judenkünig"
*Thomas Mancinus (1550 – c. 1612)
*Arnolt Schlick (c. 1450 – c. 1525)
*Pierre Alamire (c. 1470 – 1536) Active in the Low Countries
*Hans Buchner (1483 – 1538)
*Martin Agricola (1486 – 1556)
*Arnold von Bruck (c. 1490 – 1554)
*Leonhard Kleber (c. 1490 – 1556)
*Benedictus Ducis (c. 1492 – 1544)
*Lorenz Lemlin (c. 1495 – c. 1549) Also spelt "Laurenz"
*Johann Walter (1496 – 1570)
*Hans Gerle (c. 1498 – 1570)
*Wolfgang Schmeltzl (c. 1500 to 1505 – c. 1564)

1501–1571

*Hans Neusiedler (1508 – 1563)
*Georg Forster (c. 1510 – 1568)
*Caspar Othmayr (1515 – 1553)
*Jobst von Brandt (1517 – 1570)
*Sigmund Hemmel (c. 1520 – 1565)
*Hermann Finck (1527 – 1558)
*Elias Nikolaus Ammerbach (c. 1530 – 1597)
*Mattheus Waissel (c. 1540 – 1602)
*Leonhard Lechner (c. 1553 – 1606)
*Johannes Nucius (c. 1556 – 1620)
*Hieronymus Praetorius (1560 – 1629)
*Elias Mertel (c. 1561 – 1626)
*Andreas Raselius (c. 1562 – 1602)
*Hans Leo Hassler (1564 – 1612) Also spelt "Haßler"
*Christoph Demantius (1567 – 1643)
*Michael Praetorius (c. 1571 – 1621)

Italian

After the Burgundian School came to an end, Italy became a leading exponent of renaissance music and continued its innovation with the Venetian and (somewhat more conservative) Roman Schools of composition. In particular the "Venetian School"'s polychoral compositions of the late 16th century were among the most famous musical events in Europe, and their influence on musical practice in other countries was enormous. The innovations introduced by the "Venetian School", along with the contemporary development of monody and opera in Florence, together define the end of the musical Renaissance and the beginning of the musical Baroque.

1350–1470

*Zacara da Teramo
*Paolo da Firenze (c. 1355 – c. 1436; aka Paolo Tenorista)
*Giovanni Mazzuoli (Giovanni degli Organi) (1360–1426) Also known as "Jovannes de Florentia", "Giovanni degli Organi" & "Giovanni di Niccol"
*Piero Mazzuoli (Son of Giovanni Mazzuoli, whose compositions are all found in the San Lorenzo palimpsest)
*Antonio da Cividale (fl.c. 1392 – 1421) Also known as "Antonius de Civitate Austrie"
*Antonius Romanus (fl. 1400 – 1432)
*Bartolomeo da Bologna (fl. 1405 – 1427)
*Grazioso da Padova (fl. 1390? - 1410?) also known as Gratiosus de Padua
*Nicolaus Zacharie (c. 1400 or before – 1466)
*Johannes de Quadris (c. 1410 – ? 1457)
*Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro (c. 1420 – 1484) Dance master
*Antonius Janue (fl.c. 1460)
*Franchinus Gaffurius (1451 – 1522)
*Marchetto Cara (c. 1470 – ? 1525)
*Bartolomeo Tromboncino (c. 1470 – c. 1535)

1471–1500

*Bartolomeo degli Organi (1474 – 1539)
*Vincenzo Capirola (1474 – after 1548)
*Filippo de Lurano (c. 1475 – c. 1520)
*Francesco Spinacino (late 15th cent. – after 1507)
*Antonio Caprioli (fl.c. 1500)
*Gasparo Alberti (c. 1480 – 1560)
*Andrea Antico (c. 1480 – after 1538) Early Roman printer and competitor of Petrucci; born in modern-day Croatia
*Marco Dall'Aquila (c. 1480 – after 1538) Also called "Marco da l'Aquila"?
*Maistre Jhan (c. 1485 – 1538) Early madrigalist, active at Ferrara
*Francesco Patavino (fl.c. 1500)
*Bernardo Pisano (1490 – 1548) Possibly the earliest composer of madrigals, though not in name
*Pietro Paolo Borrono (c. 1490 – 1563)
*Francesco de Layolle (1492 – c. 1540) Florentine composer, in the employ of the Medici; music teacher to sculptor Benvenuto Cellini
*Costanzo Festa (c. 1495 – 1545)
*Francesco Canova da Milano (1497 – 1543)
*Mattio Rampollini (1497 – c. 1553)
*Albert de Rippe (c.1500 – 1551) Also known as "Alberto da Ripa" and "da Mantova"
*Giovanni Thomaso Cimello (c. 1500 – after 1579)

1501–1525

*Francesco Corteccia (1502 – 1571)
*Ambrose Lupo (1505 – 1591) Also known as "Ambrosio Lupo", "de Almaliach" and "Lupus Italus". Active in England
*Paolo Aretino (1508 – 1584) Also known as "Paolo Antonio del Bivi"
*Antonio Gardano (1509 – 1569) Music printer
*Andrea Gabrieli (c. 1510 – 1586) Uncle of Giovanni Gabrieli
*Vincenzo Ruffo (c. 1510 – 1587)
*Claudio Veggio (c. 1510 – 15??)
*Giovanni Domenico da Nola (c. 1515 – 1592)
*Giandomenico Martoretta (c. 1515 - 15??) Calabrian madrigalist, active in Sicily
*Agostino Agostini (d. 1569) Father of Lodovico Agostini
*Gioseffo Zarlino (1517 – 1590)
*Francesco Cellavenia (fl. 1538 – 1563)
*Giovanni Paolo Paladini (fl.c. 1540 – 1560)
*Giovanni Animuccia (c. 1520 – 1571)
*Vincenzo Galilei (c. 1520 – 1591) Father of composer Michelagnolo Galilei and astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei
*Francesco Portinaro (c. 1520 – after 1577) Madrigalist, native of Padua
*Hoste da Reggio (c. 1520 – 1569) Madrigalist, active at Milan and Bergamo
*Ippolito Ciera (fl. 1546 – 1564) Minor madrigalist, active at Treviso; follower of Willaert
*Girolamo Parabosco (c. 1524 – 1577) Minor member of the Venetian School
*Girolamo Cavazzoni (c. 1525 – after 1577)
*Giocoso Gorzanis (c. 1525 – after 1575)
*Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c. 1525 – 1594)

1526–1550

*Annibale Padovano (1527 – 1575)
*Baldassare Donato (1525 to 1530 – 1603)
*Costanzo Porta (c. 1529 – 1601)
*Cesare Negri (before 1536 – after 1604) Dancemaster
*Giovanni Battista Conforti (fl.c. 1550)
*Fabrizio Caroso (c. 1530 – after 1600)
*Giulio Fiesco (fl. 1550 – 1570) (madrigalist, active at Ferrara)
*Gianmatteo Asola (1532 or earlier – 1609)
*Claudio Merulo (1533 – 1604)
*Francesco Soto de Langa (1534 – 1619)
*Annibale Stabile (c. 1535 – 1595)
*Pietro Vinci (c. 1535 – 1584) Madrigalist; founder of the Sicilian school
*Pietro Taglia (fl. c. 1555 – 1565) Madrigalist in Milan; follower of Cipriano de Rore
*Annibale Zoilo (c. 1537 – 1592)
*Giovanni Dragoni (c. 1540 – 1598)
*Filippo Azzaiolo (fl. 1557 – 1569)
*Fabrizio Dentice (fl.c. 1550 – 1600)
*Paola Massarenghi (fl. 1565 – 1585)
*Maddalena Casulana (c. 1540 – c. 1590)
*Giovanni Ferretti (c. 1540 – after 1609)
*Gioseffo Guami (c. 1540 – 1611) Also known as "Giuseppe Guami". Brother of Francesco Guami
*Giovanni Leonardo Primavera (1540 – 1585)
*Alessandro Striggio (c. 1540 – 1592) Musician to the Medici; composer of the colossal 60-voice "Missa sopra Ecco sì beato giorno"
*Tiburzio Massaino (before 1550 – after 1608)
*Vincenzo Bellavere (c. 1540/1 – 1587) Also spelt "Bell'Haver"
*Francesco Rovigo (1540/1541 – 1597) Composed liturgical music and madrigals; active at Mantua and Graz
*Alfonso Ferrabosco the elder (1543 – 1588) Active in England
*Giovanni Maria Nanino (1543/44 – 1607) Also spelt "Nanini". Brother of Giovanni Bernardino Nanino
*Francesco Guami (c. 1544 – 1602) Brother of Gioseffo Guami; active in Germany and Italy
*Ascanio Trombetti (1544 – 1590)
*Giulio Caccini (c. 1545 – 1618) One of the founders of opera
*Gioseppe Caimo (c. 1545 – 1584) Active at Milan; madrigalist and organist
*Luzzasco Luzzaschi (c. 1545 – 1607) Late madrigalist at Ferrara
*Marc'Antonio Ingegneri (c. 1547 – 1592) Madrigalist and teacher of Monteverdi; active at Cremona
*Francesco Soriano (c. 1548 – 1621)
*Emilio de' Cavalieri (c. 1550 – 1602)
*Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi (c. 1550 – 1622)
*Cesario Gussago (c. 1550 – 1612)
*Pomponio Nenna (c. 1550 – 1613)
*Riccardo Rognoni (c. 1550 – c. 1620)
*Ruggiero Trofeo (c. 1550 – 1614)
*Orazio Vecchi (1550 – 1605) Also spelt "Horatio"
*Girolamo Conversi (fl.c. 1572 – 1575)

1551–1575

*Girolamo Dalla Casa (d. 1601)
*Benedetto Pallavicino (c. 1551 – 1601)
*Girolamo Belli (1552 – c. 1620)
*Luca Marenzio (c. 1553 – 1599)
*Lodovico Agostini (1534 – 1590) Illegitimate son of Agostino Agostini
*Paolo Bellasio (1554 – 1594)
*Cosimo Bottegari (1554 – 1620)
*Girolamo Diruta (c. 1554 – after 1610)
*Gabriele Villani (c. 1555 – 1625)
*Giovanni Croce (c. 1557 – 1609)
*Alfonso Fontanelli (1557 – 1622)
*Giovanni Gabrieli (1557 – 1612)
*Giovanni Bassano (c. 1558 – 1617)
*Felice Anerio (c. 1560 – 1614) Brother of Giovanni Francesco Anerio
*Giulio Belli (c. 1560 – c. 1621)
*Dario Castello (c. 1560 – c. 1640)
*Carlo Gesualdo (1560 – 1613)
*Ruggiero Giovannelli (c. 1560 – 1625)
*Antonio Il Verso (c. 1560 – 1621)
*Stefano Rossetto (fl. 1560 – 1580) Active in Italy and Germany
*Jacopo Peri (1561 – 1633)
*Francisco de Peraza (c. 1564 – c. 1600)
*Ascanio Mayone (1565 – 1627)
*Erasmo Marotta (1565 - 1641) Sicilian composer
*Giovanni Pietro Flaccomio (c. 1565 - 1617) Sicilian composer, chapel master at the court of Philip III of Spain
*Alessandro Piccinini (1566 – 1638)
*Lucia Quinciani (c. 1566 – fl. 1611)
*Lorenzo Allegri (1567 – 1648)
*Giovanni Francesco Anerio (c. 1567 – buried 1630) Brother of Felice Anerio
*Claudio Monteverdi (1567 – 1643)
*Massimo Troiano (fl. 1567 to 1570 – after 1570)
*Adriano Banchieri (1568 – 1634)
*Ottavio Vernizzi (1569 – 1649)
*Diomedes Cato (c. 1570 – after 1615) Worked all his life in Poland
*Giovanni Paolo Cima (1570 – 1622)
*Salamone Rossi (1570 – 1630)
*Claudia Sessa (c. 1570 – between 1613 and 1619)
*Francesco Usper (c. 1570 – 1641) Also known as "Spongia"
*Cesarina Ricci (c. 1573 – fl. 1597)
*Giovanni Bernardino Nanino (1560 – 1623) Brother of Giovanni Maria Nanino
*Giulio Cesare Martinengo (1564 or 1568 – 1613)
*Michelagnolo Galilei (1575 – 1631) Active in Bavaria and Poland. Son of composer Vincenzo Galilei, brother of astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei
*Vittoria Aleotti (c. 1575 – after 1620) Believed to be the same person as "Raffaella Aleotti" (c. 1570 – after 1646)

1576–1600

*Caterina Assandra (1580 – 1632)
*Adreana Basile (c. 1580 – c. 1640)
*Gregorio Allegri (1582 – 1652)
*Sigismondo d'India (c. 1582 – 1629)
*Antonio Cifra (1584 – 1629)
*Francesco Rognoni (c. 1585 – before 1626)
*Francesca Caccini (1587 – ? 1640)
*Lucrezia Orsina Vizzana (1590 – 1662)
*Settimia Caccini (1591 – ? 1638)
*Claudia Rusca (1593 – 1676)

Polish

During a period of favourable economic and political conditions at the beginning of the 16th century, Poland reached the height of its powers, when it was one of the richest and most powerful countries in Europe. It encompassed an area which included present day Lithuania and Latvia and portions of what is now Ukraine, Belarus, Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Germany. As the middle class prospered, patronage for the arts in Poland increased, and also looked westward - particularly to Italy - for influences.

*Jerzy Liban z Legnicy (1464 – after 1546)
*Mikołaj z Chrzanowa (1485 – 1555)
*Sebastian z Felsztyna (c. 1490 – 1543)
*Sebastian Herburt (c. 1490 – 1543) Same as Sebastian z Felsztyna (c. 1490 – after 1543) ?
*Jan z Lublina (late 15th century – 1540)
*Mikołaj z Krakowa (first half of 16th century)
*Wacław z Szamotuł (c. 1520 – c. 1560)
*Cyprian Bazylik (1535 – c. 1600)
*Mikołaj Gomółka (c. 1535 – c. 1609)
*Krzysztof Borek (? – 1573)
*Marcin Leopolita (c. 1540 – c. 1584) Also known as "Marcin ze Lwowa"
*Jakub Polak (c. 1545 – 1605) Also known as "Jacob Polonais", "Jakub Reys", "Jacques le Polonois" and "Jacob de Reis". Active in France
*Nicolaus Cracoviensis (16th cent.)
*Tomasz Szadek (c. 1550 – after 1611)
*Krzysztof Klabon (c. 1550 – after 1616)
*Mikołaj Zieleński (c. 1550 – c. 1616)
*Marcin Wartecki (second half of 16th century)
*Wojciech Długoraj (c. 1557 – after 1619)
*Petrus de Drusina (c. 1560 – 1611)
*Diomedes Cato (before 1570 – c. 1603)
*Andrzej Hakenberger (1574 – 1627)

Portuguese

*Pedro de Escobar (c. 1465 – 1535)
*Heliodoro de Paiva (c. 1500–1552)
*António Carreira (c. 1515 to 1530 – c. 1590 to 1597)
*Manuel da Fonseca (fl.c. 1540)
*Vicente Lusitano (fl. 1550 – 1561)
*Manuel Mendes (c. 1547 – 1605)
*Pedro de Cristo (c. 1550 – 1618)
*Manuel Rodrigues Coelho (c. 1555 – c. 1635)
*Duarte Lobo (c. 1565 – 1647)
*Gaspar Fernandes (1566 - 1629)
*Manuel Cardoso (1566 – 1650)
*Filipe de Magalhães (1571 - 1652)
*Estêvão de Brito (1575 - 1641)
*John IV of Portugal (1603 – 1656)

panish

1430–1510

*Juan de Urrede (c. 1430 – after 1482) Also known as "Johannes de Wreede", born in the Netherlands
*Juan de Triana (fl.c. 1460–1500)
*Francisco de la Torre (c. 1460 – ? 1505)
*Juan de Anchieta (1462 – 1523)
*Juan del Encina (1468 – c. 1529)
*Francisco de Peñalosa (c. 1470 – 1528)
*Andreas de Silva (c. 1475 – 1480)
*Matheo Flecha the elder (? 1481 – ? 1553) Also known as "Mateu Fletxa el Vell" in Catalan. Father of Matheo Flecha the younger
*Juan Pérez de Gijón (fl.c. 1460 – 1500)
*Bartolomé de Escobedo (c. 1500 – 1563)
*Luis de Milán (c. 1500 – c. 1561)
*Cristóbal de Morales (c. 1500 – 1553)
*Luis de Narváez (c. 1500 – between 1550 and 1560)
*Juan Bermudo (c. 1510 – c. 1565)
*Juan Vásquez (c. 1500 – c. 1560)
*Antonio de Cabezón (1510 – 1566) Father of "Hernando de Cabezón"
*Alonso Mudarra (c. 1510 – 1580)
*Diego Ortiz (c. 1510 – c. 1570)

1511–1570

*Tomás de Santa María (c. 1515 – 1570)
*Miguel de Fuenllana (c. 1500 or 1525 – 1579)
*Francisco Guerrero (1528 – 1599)
*Rodrigo de Ceballos (c. 1530 – 1591)
*Juan Navarro (c. 1530 – 1580)
*Juan Navarro (c. 1560 – after 1604) Active in Mexico
*Leonardo Meldart Fiamengo (fl.c. 1550 – 1600)
*Matheo Flecha the younger (c. 1530 – 1604) "Mateu Fletxa el Jove" in Catalan. Son of Matheo Flecha the elder
*Hernando Franco (1532 – 1585) Active in Guatemala and Mexico
*Hernando de Cabezón (1541 – 1602) Son of "Antonio de Cabezón"
*Ginés Pérez de la Parra (c. 1548 – 1600)
*Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548 – 1611)
*Sebastián Raval (c. 1550 - 1604)
*Alonso Lobo (c. 1555 – 1617)
*Sebastián Aguilera de Heredia (1565 – 1627)
*Joan Pau Pujol (1570 – 1626)

Other

*Paul Hofhaimer (1459 – 1537) Austrian
*Robert Johnson (c. 1470 – after 1554) Scottish. Active in England and Scotland
*John Lloyd (c. 1480 – 1523) Welsh. Also spelt "Lloidd", "Floyd". Active in England. Works include the complex Mass on "O quam suavis"
*Robert Carver (1484/5 – after 1568) Scottish. Wrote a mass on "L'Homme armé" (the only known by a British composer) and a nineteen part "O bone jesu"
*Ludwig Senfl (c. 1486 – c. 1542) Swiss. Active in Germany
*Bálint Bakfark (1507 – 1576) Hungarian
*John Angus (c. 1515 – 1596) Scottish
*Robert Douglas (early 16th cent.) Scottish. Works ascribed to him in the Christchurch partbooks, are in fact by Orlande de Lassus
*David Peebles (fl.c. 1530 – 1579) Scottish
*Philip ap Rhys (fl. 1545 – 1560) Probably Welsh. Also spelt "Ryce"
*Jacobus Gallus (1550 – 1591) Slovenian. Also known as "Jacob Handl". Active in Moravia and Bohemia
*Ivan Lukačić (1584? – 1648) Croatian
*Krytof Harant z Polic a Bezdruic (1564 – 1621) Czech
*William Kinloch (16th – 17th cent.) Scottish. Five keyboard pieces (and possibly others) in the National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh; there is also a "Pavan" and "Galliard" by 'Kinloughe' in a British Museum MS

Unknown nationality

*Lupus (c. 1495 – after 1530) Possibly a Franco-Flemish composer, whose music has survived in the "Medici Codex": stylistically distinct from Lupus Hellinck who otherwise would be identified as this composer
*Teodora Ginés (c. 1530 – after 1598) Not to be confused with the later Cuban singer and former slave of the same name
*Jean Courtois (fl. 1530 – 1545) Flemish or French, active at Cambrai

ee also

There is considerable overlap near the beginning and end of this era. See lists of composers for the previous and following eras.
* List of Medieval composers
* List of Baroque composers


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