Max Bodenstein


Max Bodenstein
Max Bodenstein

Max Bodenstein
Born July 15, 1871
Magdeburg, Germany
Died September 3, 1942
Berlin, Germany
Residence Germany,
Nationality German
Institutions University of Leipzig,
Humboldt University of Berlin,
University of Hanover,
Alma mater University of Heidelberg
Doctoral advisor Victor Meyer,
Known for “Bodenstein-number”, a special type of Peclet number

Max Ernst August Bodenstein (born July 15, 1871 in Magdeburg - died September 3, 1942 in Berlin) was a German physical chemist known for his work in chemical kinetics. He was first to postulate a chain reaction mechanism and that explosions are branched chain reactions, later applied to the atomic bomb.

Contents

Career

He received his PhD with the theme: "Zersetzung des Jodwasserstoffes in der Hitze" (Degradation of hydrogen iodide in hot temperature) with Victor Meyer at the University of Heidelberg.

He also studied decomposition of hydrohalic acids and their formation. Furthermore Bodenstein studied catalysis in flowing systems and discovered diffusion controlled catalytic reactions and photochemical reactions with Karl Liebermann at the Technical University of Berlin and with Walter Nernst at the University of Göttingen. After having returned to the University of Heidelberg in the year 1899 he habilitated with the theme: "Gasreaktionen in der chemischen Kinetik" (Reaction of Gas in the chemical kinetics).

In 1904 he was firstly appointed as honorary professor at the physicochemical institute from Wilhelm Ostwald at the University of Leipzig before furthermore in 1906 he was called to become associate professor at the University of Berlin and senior manager of the physicochemical institute of Walter Nernst. In 1908 he decided to change to the University of Hanover where he was appointed professor in ordinary and director of the electrochemical institute. Finally in 1923 he went back to Berlin where he accepted to be director of the physicochemical institute after the retirement of Walter Nernst.

Max Bodenstein was also co-operator with the "German Atomgewichts-Kommission" (German Commission of Atomic Weights), co-editor of the journal "Physikalische Chemie" (Physical chemistry) and since 1924 ordinary member in the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

He died in Berlin. His tomb is at the cemetery Berlin-Nikolassee. A tablet commemorating Bodenstein and Walther Nernst was placed in 1983.[1]

Awards

In 1936 he was awarded the "August Wilhelm von Hofmann votive medal" from the "German Chemical Society". Furthermore he became honorary doctor of science of the University of Princeton and Dr.-Ing. E.h. (honorary doctor of engineering).

Special case and literature

  • Chemische Kinetik. Ergebnisse der exakten Naturwiss., Berlin 1922; I., page 197-209,
  • Photochemie. Ergebnisse der exakten Naturwiss., Berlin 1922; I, page 210-227,
  • Completed references of his works in the library of Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften:[2]
  • Completed references of his works in the Wiley Interscience:[3]
  • Works of Max Bodenstein in the German National Library [4]

The Bodenstein number, a special type of Peclet number that is often used to describe axial mixing in so-called axial-dispersion models, is named after him.

References

  1. ^ Image of commemorative tablet
  2. ^ works in library of Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften[1]
  3. ^ Works in Wiley Interscience[2]
  4. ^ Max Bodenstein in the German National Library catalogue (German)

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Max Bodenstein — Max Ernst August Bodenstein (* 15. Juli 1871 in Magdeburg; † 3. September 1942 in Berlin) war ein deutscher Physikochemiker. Inhaltsverzeichnis …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Max Bodenstein — Max Ernst August Bodenstein Max Bodenstein Naissance 15 juillet 1871 Magdeburg (Allemagne) Décès 3 septembre 1942 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Max Bodenstein — Max Ernst August Bodenstein Nacimiento 15 de julio de 1871 Magdeburgo Fallecimiento 3 de septiembre de …   Wikipedia Español

  • Bodenstein — bezeichnet: einen Ortsteil von Nittenau, Landkreis Schwandorf, siehe Bodenstein (Nittenau) Schloss Bodenstein im gleichnamigen Ortsteil Bodenstein bei Nittenau einen Ortsteil von Wallmoden, Niedersachsen Burg Bodenstein bei Kirchohmfeld,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bodenstein'sche Quasistationarität — Das Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätsprinzip (auch Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätshypothese, Quasistationaritätsbedingung oder nur Quasistationarität genannt) ist eine Näherung für eine chemische Reaktion über ein Zwischenprodukt. Wenn… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bodenstein'sches Quasistationaritätsprinzip — Das Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätsprinzip (auch Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätshypothese, Quasistationaritätsbedingung oder nur Quasistationarität genannt) ist eine Näherung für eine chemische Reaktion über ein Zwischenprodukt. Wenn… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bodenstein-Hypothese — Das Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätsprinzip (auch Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätshypothese, Quasistationaritätsbedingung oder nur Quasistationarität genannt) ist eine Näherung für eine chemische Reaktion über ein Zwischenprodukt. Wenn… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bodenstein-Zahl — Die Bodenstein Zahl (auch kurz Bo, benannt nach Max Bodenstein) ist eine dimensionslose Kennzahl aus der Reaktionstechnik, die das Verhältnis der konvektiv zugeführten zu den durch Diffusion zugeführten Molen beschreibt. Damit charakterisiert die …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bodenstein’sches Quasistationaritätsprinzip — Das Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätsprinzip (auch Bodenstein sches Quasistationaritätshypothese, Quasistationaritätsbedingung oder nur Quasistationarität genannt) ist eine Näherung für eine chemische Reaktion über ein reaktives… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bodenstein — Bodenstein,   1) Adam von, Arzt, * Karlstadt 1528, ✝ Basel 1577; lehrte in Basel als Professor das paracelsische System der Medizin und gab verschiedene Schriften des Paracelsus heraus; Verfasser eines Lexikons der von Paracelsus benutzten… …   Universal-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.