Label (heraldry)


Label (heraldry)

closely resembling the strap with pendants which, from the saddle, crossed the horse's chest.

It is the oldest mark of difference, but sometimes borne as a charge. As a difference (in English heraldry), it was used to mark the elder son, generally by the princes of the royal house. Differences, or marks of cadency, are the distinctions used to indicate the various branches (cadets) of a family. The eldest son, during the lifetime of his father, bears the family arms with the addition of a label; the second son a crescent, the third, a mullet, the fourth, a martlet, the fifth, an annulet; the sixth, a fleur-de-lis; the seventh, a rose; the eighth, a cross moline; the ninth, a double quatrefoil.

The label's number of points did not necessarily mean anything, although the label of three points was supposed to represent the heir during the lifetime of his father; five points, during the lifetime of his grandfather; seven points, while the great-grandfather still lived, etc. According to the modern system, the elder son of an elder son places a label upon a label.


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Label (disambiguation) — A label is any kind of tag attached to something so as to identify the object or its content.Label may also refer to: * Label (heraldry), a charge closely resembling the strap with pendants which, from the saddle, crossed the horse s chest *… …   Wikipedia

  • Label — La bel (l[=a] b[e^]l), n. [OF. label sort of ribbon or fringe, label in heraldry, F. lambeau shred, strip, rag; of uncertain origin; cf. L. labellum, dim. of labrum lip, edge, margin, G. lappen flap, patch, rag, tatter (cf. {Lap} of a dress), W.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • label — [lā′bəl] n. [OFr, a rag, strip < Frank * labba, akin to OHG lappa, a rag, shred: for IE base see LAP1] 1. Archaic a) a narrow band of cloth, etc.; fillet b) a narrow strip of ribbon attached to a document to hold the seal 2. a card, strip of… …   English World dictionary

  • heraldry — heraldist, n. /her euhl dree/, n., pl. heraldries. 1. the science of armorial bearings. 2. the art of blazoning armorial bearings, of settling the rights of persons to bear arms or to use certain bearings, of tracing and recording genealogies, of …   Universalium

  • Heraldry — The German Hyghalmen Roll was made in the late fifteenth century and illustrates the German practice of repeating themes from the arms in the crest. (See Roll of arms) Heraldry is the profession, study, or art of creating, granting, and blazoning …   Wikipedia

  • Heraldry of the Holy Roman Empire — The Quarter Eagle, hand coloured woodcut (c. 1510) by Hans Burgkmair. One rendition of the coat of the country was the Quaternion Eagle printed by David de Negker of Augsburg, after a 1510 woodcut by Hans Burgkmair. It showed a selection of 56… …   Wikipedia

  • label — labeler, n. /lay beuhl/, n., v., labeled, labeling or (esp. Brit.) labelled, labelling. n. 1. a slip of paper, cloth, or other material, marked or inscribed, for attachment to something to indicate its manufacturer, nature, ownership, destination …   Universalium

  • label — {{11}}label (n.) c.1300, narrow band or strip of cloth (oldest use is as a technical term in heraldry), from O.Fr. label, lambel ribbon, fringe worn on clothes (13c., Mod.Fr. lambeau strip, rag, shred, tatter ), possibly from Frankish *labba or… …   Etymology dictionary

  • label — n. & v. n. 1 a usu. small piece of paper, card, linen, metal, etc., for attaching to an object and giving its name, information about it, instructions for use, etc. 2 esp. derog. a short classifying phrase or name applied to a person, a work of… …   Useful english dictionary

  • label — noun 1》 a small piece of paper, fabric, etc. attached to an object and giving information about it.     ↘a piece of fabric sewn inside a garment and bearing the brand name, size, or care instructions. 2》 the name or trademark of a fashion company …   English new terms dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.