New York University School of Medicine


New York University School of Medicine
NYU School of Medicine
NYU SOM Logo.gif
Seal of NYUSOM
Established 1841
Dean Robert I. Grossman
Students 737
Postgraduates 788
Location New York, NY, USA
Colors Violet and white          
Website http://school.med.nyu.edu
The NYU Logo

The New York University School of Medicine is one of the graduate schools of New York University. Founded in 1841 as the University Medical College, the NYU School of Medicine is one of the foremost medical schools in the United States.[1]

The School of Medicine is part of NYU Langone Medical Center, named after Kenneth Langone, the investment banker and financial backer of the Home Depot. It is located at 550 First Avenue in New York City. The School of Medicine has 360 full-time faculty and 175 part-time faculty. Additionally, there are 26 endowed professorships, 975 residents/fellows, 76 M.D./Ph.D. candidates and 788 post-graduate registrants as of 2007. The NYU Medical Center is home to the School of Medicine, the Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, and the Charles C. Harris Skin & Cancer Pavilion, considered the most prestigious dermatology institute in the United States.

In the 2009-10 U.S. News & World Report, NYU Medical Center was recognized on the "America's Best Hospitals Honor Roll", ranking among the top 21 hospitals in the nation with 11 top-ranked specialties including cancer, geriatric care, heart & heart surgery, kidney disorders, neurology & neurosurgery, orthopedics, psychiatry, rehabilitation, respiratory disorders, rheumatology, and urology.

Contents

Medical Education

New York University School of Medicine has recently implemented the curriculum for the 21st century.[2] The new curriculum consists of 18 months of basic science and two and a half years of clinical training. Students take the USMLE Step 1 exam after the clerkship year (with the exception of MD/PhD students, who take it before starting their PhD work). This allows students additional time to take electives, conduct research, or go on away rotations. Other features of the curriculum include NYU3T (a joint program with the New York University College of Nursing) and PLACE (Patient-Based Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience).

The NYU School of Medicine also offers several 5-year joint degree programs [3]:

Facilities

NYU Medical Center

The main NYU Langone Medical Center campus is located at the East River waterfront at 1st Ave. between 30th and 34th street. It hosts the NYU School of Medicine, Tisch Hospital and the Howard A. Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. Other NYU Langone Medical Center facilities across the city include the Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute, the NYU Cancer Center on 34th Street, and Woodhull Hospital in Brooklyn. NYU Langone Medical Center also has a long-standing affiliation with the Bellevue Hospital, NYU's principal teaching hospital, of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, and with the Manhattan Veteran's Affairs Hospital.[4]

Most recently, the NYU School of Medicine opened a new emergency simulation center at Bellevue Hospital in a joint effort with the City University of New York. Medical students, nurses, EMTs, and other medical staff will be able to practice and refine their skills on state-of-the-art mannequins, as well as actors playing standardized patients.[5]

Research facilities include the Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences[6] and the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine.[7]

History

New York University College of Medicine was established in 1841. The medical school merged with Bellevue Medical College in 1898 to form the University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. The present name was adopted in 1960.

The NYU School of Medicine is home to many key advancements in medical education. In 1854, human dissection in New York was legalized due to efforts of the faculty. In 1884, the Carnegie Laboratory, the first facility in the U.S. devoted to teaching and research in bacteriology and pathology, was established at NYU. In 1932, the first department of forensic medicine in the U.S. was established at NYU. In 1941, NYU opened the first department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the U.S. The Institute and Department of Environmental Medicine were established in 1964. In 1980, NYU professor Saul Krugman, M.D., developed the first vaccine against hepatitis B.

In 1866, NYU professors produced a report for the Council of Hygiene and Public Health which led to establishment of New York City's Health Department. The same year, NYU opened the first outpatient clinic in the United States. In 1872, NYU Professor Steven Smith founded the American Public Health Association. In 1899, NYU graduate Walter Reed discovered the mosquito transmission of yellow fever. The 1993 construction of the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine is the largest building project in history of NYU.

During World War II, NYU College of Medicine was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.[8]

Relationship with Mount Sinai School of Medicine

In 1998, the Mount Sinai-NYU Health System was established when the NYU Medical System merged with Mount Sinai Hospitals. The joint organization included Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens, Tisch Hospital, Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute, and NYU Downtown Hospital. It was reported in 2003 that the union was dissolving after a five-year affiliation while confronting a shared debt of $665.6 million. However, NYU continues to award Mount Sinai School of Medicine's degrees, making it the only private university in the country with two medical schools.[9]

Evolution of the New York University School of Medicine

Bellevue Hospital Ambulatory Care Lobby
  • 1841 - University Medical College organized as the Medical Department of the University of the City of New York
  • 1861 - Bellevue Hospital Medical College Founded
  • 1882 - New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital founded (incorporated in 1886)
  • 1896 - Name of the University of the City of New York changed to New York University
  • 1898 - University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College formed by merging of the University Medical College and Bellevue Hospital Medical College
  • 1935 - Name changed to New York University College of Medicine
  • 1945 - Post-graduate Division of New York University College of Medicine established
  • 1948 - New York University Post-Graduate Medical school formed, representing a union of the Postgraduate Division of the College of Medicine and the New York Post-Graduate Medical School
  • 1960 - Name of New York University-Bellevue Medical Center changed to New York University Medical Center - Name of New York University College of Medicine changed to New York University School of Medicine
  • 2008 - New York University Medical Center Hospitals and School of Medicine renamed NYU Langone Medical Center

Important milestones

1841: The New York University College of Medicine opens, ten years after the founding of the university. Among the original faculty is John Revere, son of patriot Paul Revere and Valentine Mott, probably the foremost surgeon of his day.

1854: Human dissection in New York is legalized due to efforts of faculty at the NYU College of Medicine.

The first successful resection of a hip joint is performed by Lewis A. Sayre, M.D., the first professor of orthopedic surgery in the United States.

1861-65: Faculty members of the NYU Medical College play a leading role in treating soldiers wounded during the Civil War, chiefly through work on the United States Sanitary Commission.

1866: NYU professors of medicine produce a Report for the Council of Hygiene and Public Health. It leads to the establishment of New York City's Health Department.

The first outpatient clinic in the United States opens at NYU.

1872: NYU's Stephen Smith, M.D., founds the American Public Health Association.

1884: The Carnegie Laboratory, the first facility in the United States devoted to teaching and research in bacteriology and pathology, is established at NYU.

1899: Dr. Walter Reed discovers the mosquito transmission of yellow fever.

1911: The first outpatient cardiac clinic in New York is established by NYU's Hubert V. Guile, M.D.

1931: Albert Sabin, who later developed a live-virus vaccine against polio, received his M.D. degree at NYU.

1932: The first department of forensic medicine in the United States is established at NYU.

NYU organizes one of the nation's first interdisciplinary research efforts, the Rheumatic Diseases Study Group, helping to usher in the era of modern rheumatology.

1933: William S. Tillett, M.D. conducts groundbreaking studies of enzymes involved in blood clotting. His work leads to the development of streptokinase, used to combat heart attacks.

1939: Jonas Salk, developer of the first vaccine against polio, receives his M.D. degree at NYU.

1941: The first department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the United States is established at NYU.

1941-45: During the war years, NYU-trained Julius Axelrod, M.D., works with James Shannon, M.D., and other faculty members in the Medical Schools malaria program. Dr. Axelrod is later awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine.

1947: A site for a new Medical Center, consisting of the NYU School of Medicine, the Post-Graduate Medical School, University (now Tisch) Hospital, and the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, is selected.

The Institute of Industrial Medicine is established.

1948: University Hospital is created through a merger of the New York Post-Graduate Hospital and New York Skin and Cancer Hospital.

1954: Lewis Thomas, M.D., assumes chairmanship of the Department of Pathology.

1955: The Medical Science Building and the Henry W. and Albert Berg Institute opens at NYU.

1957: The Hall of Research and Alumni Hall are constructed.

1959: The Nobel Prize for medicine is awarded to NYU faculty member Servero Ochoa, M.D., for his seminal study of biochemical genetics and nucleic acids.

1960: The Clinical Research Center, funded by the NIH, is established at NYU.

1960s: NYU pathologist Baruj Benacerraf, M.D., conducts pioneering research on genetic regulation of the immune system, for which he is later awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1980.

1963: The new University Hospital opens.

1964: NYU establishes one of the first three Medical Scientist Training Programs (dual MD/PhD graduate programs funded by the NIH) in the United States.

1964: The Institute and Department of Environmental Medicine are established.

1975: One of the first designated national cancer centers is established at NYU, later named the Rita and Stanley H. Kaplan Center.

1980: Saul Krugman, M.D., professor of pediatrics, develops the first vaccine against hepatitis B. Earlier, he had been honored for his research work in rubella.

1981: NYU scientists present the first evidence linking rare cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma, with immune deficiency in a distinct population of homosexual men, a key step in identifying AIDS.

Smilow Research building

1992: NYU Medical Center opens Women's Health Services under the auspices of the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Radiology.

1993: The School of Medicine's Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, the largest building project in history of NYU, is opened as an uncompromising commitment to the advancement and understanding of molecular approaches for the treatment of various important diseases.

1998: NYU Medical Center is restructured, creating the "NYU Hospitals Center" (including Tisch Hospital and Rusk Institute), the "NYU Health System" (consisting of NYU Hospitals Center, Hospital for Joint Diseases and NYU Downtown Hospital), and the "NYU School of Medicine" which remains an administrative unit of New York University.

2004: The NYU Clinical Cancer Center is opened.

2006: The School of Medicine's Joan and Joel Smilow Research Center is opened and houses 9 dedicated programmatic areas: Cancer, Cardiovascular Biology, Dermatology/Cutaneous Biology, Genetics/Genomics/Proteomics, Medicine/Infectious Disease, Medicine/Renal Medicine, Microbial Pathogenesis, Integrated Neuroscience, and Stem Cell Biology.

2006: NYU Medical Center won a grant of $26.7 million. This was the largest grant rewarded by any school in NYU. It was rewarded on behalf of Dr. Jonathan Ship

Institutional Pedigrees

Institutional Pedigree of the New York University Medical School
New York University Medical College founded 1841[10]                
      1898[10] merge   →   University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College   →   1960 name change   →   New York University Medical School
Bellevue Hospital Medical College founded 1861[10]                
Institutional Pedigree of the New York University Hospital
Red Cross Hospital founded 1893[11] 1914 name change[12] Park Hospital    
     
Demilt Dispensary founded 1851[13]   1922 merge[14] created Reconstruction Hospital  →    
         
  Clinic for Functional Re-education founded 1918[15]        
     
Post Graduate Hospital founded 1882[16]   Reconstruction Hospital absorbed into Post Graduate Hospital in 1929[17]    
    1948 merge created University Hospital
New York Skin and Cancer Hospital founded 1883[18]      

List of deans

The Hospital for Joint Diseases on Second Avenue at East 17th Street
  • John W. Draper, President of the Faculty (1850–1873)
  • Alfred C. Post, President of the Faculty (1873–1877)
  • Charles Inslee Pardee, Dean (1877–1897)
  • Egbert Le Fevre, Acting Dean (1897–1898)
  • Edward G. Janeway, Dean (1898–1905)
  • Egbert Le Fevre, Dean (1905–1914)
  • William H. Park, Acting Dean (1914–1915)
  • Samuel A. Brown, Dean (1915–1932)
  • John H. Wyckoff, Dean (1932–1937)
  • Currier McEwen, Dean (1937–1955)
  • Donal Sheehan, Acting Dean (1943–1954), Dean (1955–1960)
  • S. Bernard Wortis, Dean (1960–1963)
  • Saul J. Farber, Acting Dean (1963–1966)
  • Lewis Thomas, Dean (1966–1969)
  • Ivan L. Bennet Jr., Director-Dean (1970–1982)
  • Saul J. Farber, Acting Dean (1979–1987), Dean (1987–1997)
  • Noel L. Cohen, Interim Provost & Interim Dean (1997–1998)
  • Robert M. Glickman, Dean (1998–2007)
  • Robert I. Grossman, Dean (2007-

Notable people

Alumni

Faculty

  • Steven Flanagan, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
  • Rodolfo Llinas, Professor of Physiology & Neuroscience
  • David Sabitini, Professor of Cell Biology
  • Martin J. Blaser, Frederick H. King Professor of Internal Medicine, Chairman, Department of Medicine, and Professor of Microbiology
  • John E. Sarno, Professor of Clinical Rehabilitation Medicine
  • Harry Ostrer, Professor of Human Genetics, Jewish Geneticist
  • William L. Goldberg, Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Emergency Medicine, and published author
  • Enrico Fazzini, D.O., Professor of Neurology and expert on Parkinson's disease
  • Max Einhorn, Professor of Medicine, inventor of gastroenterology instruments
  • Ruben Kuzniecky, Professor of Neurology
  • Jonathan A. Ship, Founder and Creator of Bluestone Center for Clinical Research

Notes

  1. ^ "New York University | Best Medical School | US News." US News & World Report | News & Rankings | Best Colleges, Best Hospitals, and More. Web. 11 Nov. 2011. <http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/school-of-medicine-04073>.
  2. ^ Curriculum for the 21st Century: School of Medicine Adopts a New Approach to Medical Education
  3. ^ Masters Programs
  4. ^ History of Bellevue and HHC, Answers.com
  5. ^ "Emergency Simulation Center Nearly Ready At Bellevue" New York Times Sep 4, 2011
  6. ^ http://sackler.med.nyu.edu
  7. ^ http://saturn.med.nyu.edu
  8. ^ "Biography of Victor Parsonnet". Heart Rhythm Society. December 23, 1998. http://www.hrsonline.org/News/ep-history/notable-figures/victorparsonnet.cfm. Retrieved September 29, 2011. 
  9. ^ Fein, Esther B. After Earlier Failure, N.Y.U. and Mount Sinai Medical Centers to Merge." The New York Times, 25 January 1998.
  10. ^ a b c Friss, Evan (December 6, 2004), "Chronicles: A Look at NYU’s Past; Practicing Medicine Through the Years", NYU Today (New York: New York University, Office of Public Affairs) 18 (5), OCLC 37719351, http://www.nyu.edu/nyutoday/archives/18/05/Stories/chronicles-18-05.html 
  11. ^ Dock, Lavinia L.; Pickett, Sarah Elizabeth; Noyes, Clara D.; Clement, Fannie F.; Fox, Elizabeth G.; Van Meter, Anna R. (1922), History of American Red Cross Nursing, New York: The Macmillan Company, pp. 23, OCLC 1170933, http://books.google.com/?id=kHZ_S6kx8TkC&printsec=toc .
  12. ^ Dock, et al. (1922) p. 35.
  13. ^ "THE DEMILT DISPENSARY.; Anniversary Celebration", The New York Times, March 27, 1855, http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9402E2DB123DE034BC4F51DFB566838E649FDE 
  14. ^ "RECONSTRUCTION PLANS TO EXTEND HOSPITAL; $1,500,000 Needed for Expansion and Equipment to Make It Self-Supporting", The New York Times, January 29, 1922, http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9403EFD91239E133A2575AC2A9679C946395D6CF 
  15. ^ New York State Legislature (1920), "Dispensaries Licensed", New York Legislative Documents (Albany, New York: J.B. Lyon Company) XIX (38): 186, http://books.google.com/?id=1dBKAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage 
  16. ^ "MENTAL CLINIC AIMS AT WIDER SERVICE; Post-Graduate Hospital Unit Founded by Dr. M.G. Schlapp Marks 47th Anniversary. INDIVIDUAL AID TO PATIENTS Main Purpose Is to Easy Social Burden by Treating Neuroses and Border-Line Cases", The New York Times, November 10, 1929, http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0A1EFA3454127A93C2A8178AD95F4D8285F9 
  17. ^ "Post Graduate Absorbs", Time (Albany, New York: J.B. Lyon Company) XIV (24), December 9, 1929, http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,738238,00.html 
  18. ^ "First Year'S Work Of A Hospital", The New York Times, March 1, 1884, http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9C05E4DD113BE033A25752C0A9659C94659FD7CF 
  19. ^ Davis, George. "A HEALING HAND IN HARLEM", The New York Times, April 22, 1979. Accessed June 3, 2010.
  20. ^ "Obituary", Medical sentinel 16: 196, 1908, http://books.google.com/?id=vBgCAAAAYAAJ&dq=oregon%20dr.%20augustus%20kinney&pg=PA196. 
  21. ^ Corning, Howard M. (1989) Dictionary of Oregon History. Binfords & Mort Publishing. p. 135.
  22. ^ Severo, Richard. "Valentino Mazzia, 77, Student Of Deaths Under Anesthesia", The New York Times, March 21, 1999. Accessed October 21, 2009.
  23. ^ "Hair transplantation approach of tiny strips with the help of Dermatologist Norman Orentreich". Healthy Hair Highlights News. 10 July 2011. http://healthyhairhighlights.com/new_approach_to_hair_transplant.html. Retrieved 2011-13-09. 

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