Anomoeanism


Anomoeanism

In 4th century Christianity, the Anomœans, also known as Anomeans, Heterousians, Aetians, or Eunomians, were a sect of Arians who asserted that Jesus of Nazareth (the Son) was of a different nature and in no way like to that of God (the Father). They believed that the opinions of Arius, as he originally expressed them, were correct, but rejected his later confessions, which he adopted in order to be readmitted into the Church.

The word Anomœan comes from Greek Polytonic|ἀ(ν)- 'not' and Polytonic|ὅμοιος 'similar', "i.e.", "different; dissimilar". In the 4th century, during the reign of Constantius II, this was the name by which the followers of Aëtius and Eunomius were distinguished as a theological party; they not only denied the consubstantiality of Jesus but even asserted that he was of a nature different from that of God. This was in contradistinction to the semi-Arians, who indeed denied the consubstantiality of Jesus, but believed at the same time that he was like the Father.

The semi-Arians condemned the Anomœans in the Council of Seleucia, and the Anomœans condemned the semi-Arians in their turn, in the Councils of Constantinople and Antioch; erasing the word "Polytonic|ὁμοίος" out of the formula of Rimini, and that of Constantinople, and protesting that the word had not only a different substance, but also a will different from that of the Father. Whence they were to be called "Polytonic|Ἀνομοίοι".

In the 5th century, the Anomœan presbyter Philostorgius wrote an Anomœan Church history. [Philostorgius, "Church History".]

Notable Anomoeans

*Aëtius, who founded the Anomoean tradition, later bishop (361-?). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 7, chapter 6.] [Socrates Scholasticus, "Church History", book 2, chapter 35.]
*Theodulus, bishop of Chaeretapa (?-c. 363) and Palestine (c. 363-c. 379). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2 and book 9, chapter 18.] [Socrates Scholasticus, "Church History", book 2, chapter 40.]
*Eunomius, bishop of Cyzicus (360-361) and exiled bishop (361-c. 393). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 5, chapter 3 and book 6, chapters 1-3.] [Socrates Scholasticus, "Church History", book 2, chapter 35.]
*Paemenius, bishop of Constantinople, (c. 363, at the same time as Eudoxius of Antioch). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Candidus, bishop of Lydia, (c. 363-?). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Arrianus, bishop of Ionia, (c. 363-?). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Florentius, bishop of Constantinople, (c. 363-?, at the same time as Eudoxius of Antioch). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Thallus, bishop of Lesbos, (c. 363-?, at the same time as Eudoxius of Antioch). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Euphronius, bishop of Galatia, the Black Sea and Cappadocia, (c. 363-?). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Julian, bishop of Cilicia, (c. 363-?). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Serras, Stephen, and Heliodorus, bishops of Egypt, (c. 363-?). [Philostorgius, in Photius, "Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius", book 8, chapter 2.]
*Philostorgius, historian.

Notable opponents of Anomoeanism

*Basil of Caesarea, bishop of Caesarea, and author of "Against Eunomius".

ee also

*Archbishop Nectarius of Constantinople
*Homoeans, in contrast to the Anomoeans
*Arianism/Arian Catholicism
*Arian controversy

References

*First edition Encyclopædia Britannica [issued 1768-1771]
*1728


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