Velocity Ascended, Metres per hour


Velocity Ascended, Metres per hour

Velocity Ascended, Metres per hour Vm/h usually referred to as VAM, coined by Dr Michele Ferrari [1] is the speed of elevation gain per hour in Metre per hour. This is a term used in cycling to rate how fast an individual climbs up an incline. Ferrari also stated that every one percent increase in average gradient decreases VAM by 50. For example, a 1700 VAM on a climb of 8 percent average grade is the equivalent of a level of performance on a 9 percent average grade of 1650 VAM.cite web
last = Maloney
first = Tim
title = An Interview With Dr. Michele Ferrari, part one - The Eye Of The Storm
url=http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/interviews/?id=ferrari03
]

Examples:

VAM (Vm/h) Metres Per Hour (Vm/h)
1800+ Vm/h: Lance Armstrong - and Marco Pantani of olden days
1650-1800 Vm/h: Top 10 / Tour de France GC or mountain stage winner.
1450-1650 Vm/H: Top 20 / Tour de France GC; top 20 on tough mountain stage.
1300-1450 Vm/h: Finishing Tour de France mountain stages in peloton
1100-1300 Vm/h: The Autobus Crew

Other examples of its usage can be found at CyclingNews.com. [cite web
last = Brown
first = Gregor
title = Efimkin does 1600 metres/hour
url=http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2007/sep07/sep05news2
] [cite web
last = Brown
first = Gregor
title = Simoni goes 1850 metres/hour
url=http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2007/sep07/sep05news2
] [cite web
last = Brown
first = Gregor
title = Simoni goes 1850 metres/hour
url=http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2007/may07/may31news2
] [cite web
last = Jones
first = Jeff
title = Mayo's Ventoux performance
url=http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2004/jun04/jun11news2
]

References


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