Yaakov Yitzchak of Lublin


Yaakov Yitzchak of Lublin

Yaakov Yitzchak of Lublin, also Jacob Isaac of Lublin, or Y. Y. Horowitz (Polish: Jakub Izaak Horowicz, Hebrew: יעקב יצחק הורוביץ), known as "The Chozeh of Lublin" (החוזה מלובלין, The Seer of Lublin), or simply as the "Chozeh", (1745-July 15, 1815) was a Hasidic rebbe from Poland.

A leading figure in the early Hasidic movement, he became known as the chozeh, which means "seer" or "visionary" in Hebrew, due to his great intuitive powers. He was a disciple of the Maggid of Mezritch. He continued his studies under Rabbi Shmelke of Nilkolsburg and Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhensk. He lived for a while in Lantzut before moving to Lublin.

After Yaakov Yitzchak moved to Lublin, thousands of Hasidim flocked to learn from him. Among his discples were such Hasidic luminaries as the Yid Hakodesh ("The Holy Jew"), Rabbi Simcha Bunim of Peshischa, Rabbi Meir of Apta, Rabbi David of Lelov, the Yismach Moshe, Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech of Dinov, Rabbi Naftali Zvi of Ropshitz, the Ma'or Vashemesh, and Sar Shalom of Belz. During his stay in Lublin Yaakov Yitzchak was opposed by a prominent rabbi, Rabbi Ezriel Horowitz.

He was injured in a fall from a window on Simchat Torah, and died almost a year later on Tisha B'av [1] from injuries relating to this fall. Hasidic lore has it that he was dragged through the window by angels (or demons).

On the day he died, July 15, 1815 (9th of Av, 5575, on the Hebrew Calendar), he allegedly prophesized that 100 years from that day (according to the Hebrew Calendar), the Russians would lose their reign over Poland. On July 20, 1915 (the 9th of Av, 5675 on the Hebrew Calendar), the Austrians conquered Lublin, and the Chozeh's prophecy was noted in the Polish newspapers.[citation needed]

Works

His writings are contained in four books:

  • Divrei Emet
  • Zot Zikaron
  • Zikaron Zot
  • Zikaron Tov

In a compilation of these works, entitled Torat HaChozeh MiLublin, his commentaries are arranged alphabetically according to topics and according to the weekly Torah portion.

References

  1. ^ 'Codex Judaica' M.Kantor, p.261
  • Glenn Dynner. Men of Silk: The Hasidic Conquest of Polish Jewish Society, Oxford University Press, 2006.

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