Public bathing


Public bathing
Ruins of a Roman bath in Dion, Greece, showing the under-floor heating system, or hypocaust
"Ancient Ruins Used as Public Baths" by Hubert Robert (1798)
The Asser Levy Public Baths in Manhattan, New York City (1904-1906, restored 1989-1990)
Alfred Laliberté's "Les petits Baigneurs," 1915 restored 1992 at Maisonneuve public baths, Montreal, Quebec

Public baths originated from a communal need for cleanliness. The term public may confuse some people, as some types of public baths are restricted depending on membership, gender, religious affiliation, or other reasons. As societies have changed, public baths have been replaced as private bathing facilities became more commonly available. Public baths have also become incorporated into the social system as meeting places. As the title suggests public bathing does not refer only to bathing. In ancient times public bathing included, saunas, massages and relaxation therapies. Members of the society considered it as a place to meet and socialize. It is similar to what we call a spa in today's age.

Contents

Cultures and countries

Indus Valley Civilization

The earliest public baths are found in the ruins in of the Indus Valley Civilization. According to John Keay, the "Great Bath" of Mohenjo Daro in present-day Pakistan was the size of 'a modest municipal swimming pool', complete with stairs leading down to the water at each one of its ends.[1] The bath is housed inside a larger—more elaborate—building and was used for public bathing.[1] the Great Bath and the house of the priest suggest that the Indus had a religion.

Greece

In The Book of the Bath, Françoise de Bonneville wrote, "It is unimaginable that bathing would be considered sanitary. In fact it is completely opposite in nature." where men and women washed in basins near places of exercise, physical and intellectual. Later gymnasia had indoor basins set overhead, the open maws of marble lions offering showers, and circular pools with tiers of steps for lounging. Bathing was ritualized, becoming an art – of cleansing sands, hot water, hot air in dark vaulted "vapor baths," a cooling plunge, a rubdown with aromatic oils. Cities all over Ancient Greece honored sites where "young ephebes stood and splashed water over their bodies."

Rome

The first public thermae of 19 BC had a rotunda 25 meters across, circled by small rooms, set in a park with artificial river and pool. By AD 300 the Baths of Diocletian would cover 1.5 million square feet (140,000 m²), its soaring granite and porphyry sheltering 3,000 bathers a day. Roman baths became "something like a cross between an aquacentre and a theme park," with pools, game rooms, gardens, even libraries and theatres. One of the most famous public bath sites is Aquae Sulis in Bath, England.

Dr.Garrett G Fagan, Associate Professor of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and History at The Pennsylvania State University, has named public bathing as a "social event" for the Romans in his book "Bathing in Public in the Roman World". He also states that "In Western Europe only the Finns still practice a truly public bathing habit." Dr. Fagan has done extensive research on public bathing.[2][3]

Japan

The origin of Japanese bathing is Misogi, ritual purification with water.[4] After Japan imported Buddhist culture, many temples had saunas, which were available for anyone to use for free.

In the Heian period, houses of prominent families, such as the families of court nobles or samurai, had baths. The bath had lost its religious significance and instead became leisure. Misogi became Gyōzui, to bathe in a shallow wooden tub.[5]

In the 17th century, the first European visitors to Japan recorded the habit of daily baths in sexually mixed groups.[4] Before the mid-19th century, when Western influence increased, nude communal bathing for men, women, and children at the local unisex public bath, or sentō, was a daily fact of life.

In contemporary times, many administrative regions require public baths to have separate facilities for males and females. Public baths using water from onsen (hot springs) are particularly popular. Towns with hot springs are destination resorts, which are visited daily by the locals and people from other, neighboring towns.

Ottoman Empire

During the Ottoman Empire public baths were widely used. The baths had both a religious and popular origin deriving from the Qur'an (ablution hitler ritual) and the use of steamrooms by the Turks. The Turkish baths also known as the Hammam, was considered a place for social gathering in Turkish Culture, states the official website Turkish baths. The process of Hammam is very similar to that of the roman bathing.[6]

United Kingdom

Roman style public baths were reintroduced to England by returning crusaders in the medieval period, who had enjoyed warm baths in the middle east. These, however, rapidly degenerated into brothels or at least the reputation as such. During the reign of Henry II (1154-89) many bath houses were set up on the South bank of the river Thames in Southwark, south of the city of London. They were called bagnios, from the Italian bagno, the word for bath, or "stewhouses" as the clients of the baths stewed in the hot water. By the 12th century there were 18 bagnios in Southwark alone.

Henry VI (1422-61 and 1470-71) closed the bath houses due to their bad reputation as fronts for brothels, but demand for bathing was so great he was forced to reopen them, limiting the number to 12. Finally in 1546, Henry VIII closed them down for good.

In the late 1790s ritual and elite baths were available, but it was not until the mid-19th century that Britain's first true public bath house was opened. These Turkish baths were popularised by the Turkophile MP David Urquhart. The original baths were used for individual washing and men-only swimming. It was not until 1914 that family bathing was allowed.[7]

The introduction of bath houses into British culture was a response to the public's desire for increased sanitary conditions, and by 1915 most towns in Britain had at least one.[8]

United States

In the 19th and 20th centuries, public baths were constructed in the United States, such as Bathhouse Row[9] in Arkansas, and Asser Levy Public Baths in New York City. Public baths were created to improve health and sanitary condition of the public before personal baths became commonplace.

Bathing in 1568

See also

Notes

References

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Public Landing, Maryland — Public Landing is a small unincorporated community 6.5 miles (10 km) east of Snow Hill in Worcester County, Maryland, located at coord|38|8|56|N|75|17|13|W|. Public Landing is located on Chincoteague Bay, at the end of Maryland Route 365.Public… …   Wikipedia

  • Bathing — is the immersion of the body in a fluid, usually water or an aqueous solution. It may be practiced for hygiene, religious or therapeutic purposes or as a recreational activity.Some spa facilities provide bathing in various other liquids such as… …   Wikipedia

  • PUBLIC RELATIONS — as a profession developed in the 20th century, mainly in the U.S. Until the beginning of the 20th century public relations was a refined form of propaganda employed almost exclusively to defend a movement, cause, or individual or institution,… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • public baths — public building which is equipped with facilities for bathing (sometimes associated with religious purification) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Public nudity — A woman hands out flyers at the Love Parade in Berlin …   Wikipedia

  • Bathing machine — The bathing machine was a device, popular in the 19th century, to allow people to wade in the ocean at beaches without violating Victorian notions of modesty. Bathing machines were roofed and walled wooden carts rolled into the sea. Some had… …   Wikipedia

  • Public toilet — This article is about a room or building available for public use contains a toilet. For a room in a private house containing a toilet, see toilet (room). For the film, see Public Toilet (film). Sinks in the public toilet of the Castle Terrace… …   Wikipedia

  • Sea bathing — is swimming in the sea or in sea water. Unlike bathing in a swimming pool, which is generally done for pleasure or exercise purposes, sea bathing was once thought to have curative or therapeutic value. It arose from the medieval practice of… …   Wikipedia

  • BATH, BATHING — Bathing is referred to in the Bible not only for physical cleanliness but also for ritual purposes. Jacob charged his family to wash themselves before they built the altar at Beth El (Gen. 35:3). Before the revelation at Sinai, the entire Jewish… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Ancient Roman bathing — This page is on the activity in general see thermae for buildings in which it was carried out. Bathing played a major part in Ancient Roman culture and society.Of all the leisure activities, it was one of the most important, since it was part of… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.