Means of grace


Means of grace

The Means of Grace in Christian theology are those things (the means) through which God gives grace. Just what this grace entails is interpreted in various ways: generally speaking, some see it as God blessing humankind so as to sustain and empower the Christian life; others see it as forgiveness, life, and salvation.

The Church is the congregation of saints, in which the Gospel is rightly taught and the Sacraments are rightly administered. – Augsburg Confession[1]

Contents

Lutheran theology

Lutherans teach that the Means of Grace are the ways that God the Holy Spirit creates faith in the hearts of Christians, forgives their sins, gives them eternal salvation and causes them to grow spiritually. The efficacy of these means does not depend on the faith, strength, status, or good works of those who proclaim the Word of God or administer God's sacraments; rather, the efficacy of these means rests in God alone, who has promised to work through God's gift of these means to God's church.

For Lutherans, the Means of Grace include the Gospel (both written and proclaimed), as well as the Sacrament of Holy Baptism, and the Sacrament of the Eucharist. Some Lutherans also include Confession and Absolution as sacraments and as such a means of grace, although they are not counted as such by others because no physical element is attached to Absolution, as is the case in both Baptism and the Lord's Supper.

Methodist theology

In Methodism, the means of grace are ways in which God works invisibly in disciples, quickening, strengthening and confirming faith. So, believers use them to open their hearts and lives to God's work in them. According to John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, the means of grace can be divided into two broad categories, with individual and communal components:

Works of Piety, such as:
Individual Practices--
Prayer
Fasting
Searching the Scriptures
Healthy Living
Communal Practices--
Holy Communion
Baptism
Christian Conferencing (or "community")
Works of Mercy, such as:
Service focused toward individual needs--
Doing Good (Good works)
Visiting the Sick
Visiting the Imprisoned
Feeding & Clothing those in need
Earning, Saving, & Giving all one can
Service focused toward communal/societal needs--
the Seeking of Justice; Opposition to Slavery

Careful attention to the means of grace are, for Methodists, important in the process of sanctification as one is moved on toward Christian Perfection through the work of the Holy Spirit.

See also

Printed Resources

References

  1. ^ See Augsburg Confession, Article 7, Of the Church

The Presence of God in the Christian Life: John Wesley and the Means of Grace, Henry H. Knight III (Metuchen,N.J., The Scarecrow Press, Inc. 1992)

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Means of grace — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • means of grace —  Средства благодати …   Вестминстерский словарь теологических терминов

  • Grace — (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy, favor;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Grace cup — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Grace drink — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Grace hoop — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • grace hoop — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Grace note — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Grace stroke — Grace Grace (gr[=a]s), n. [F. gr[^a]ce, L. gratia, from gratus beloved, dear, agreeable; perh. akin to Gr. ? to rejoice, cha ris favor, grace, Skr. hary to desire, and E. yearn. Cf. {Grateful}, {Gratis}.] 1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Grace Curzon, Marchioness Curzon of Kedleston — Grace Elvina, Marchioness Curzon of Kedleston (1879 1958) was born Grace Elvina Hinds in Alabama, U.S.A., the daughter of J. Monroe Hinds, former United States Minister to Brazil. Her first husband was Alfred Hubert Duggan of Buenos Aires,… …   Wikipedia


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