Domestic partnership in Nova Scotia


Domestic partnership in Nova Scotia
Legal recognition of
same-sex relationships
Marriage

Argentina
Belgium
Canada
Iceland
Netherlands

Norway
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden

Performed in some jurisdictions

Mexico: Mexico City
United States: CT, DC, IA, MA, NH, NY, VT, Coquille, Suquamish

Recognized, not performed

Aruba (Netherlands only)
Curaçao (Netherlands only)
Israel
Mexico: all states (Mexico City only)
Sint Maarten (Netherlands only)
United States: CA (conditional), MD

Civil unions and
registered partnerships

Andorra
Austria
Brazil
Colombia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Finland
France
- New Caledonia
- Wallis and Futuna
Germany

Greenland
Hungary
Ireland
Isle of Man
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
New Zealand
Slovenia
Switzerland
United Kingdom
Uruguay

Performed in some jurisdictions

Australia: ACT, NSW, TAS, VIC
Mexico: COA
United States: CA, CO, DE, HI, IL, ME, NJ, NV, OR, RI, WA, WI

Unregistered cohabitation

Australia
Croatia

Israel

Recognized in some jurisdictions

United States: MD

See also

Same-sex marriage
Same-sex marriage legislation
Timeline of same-sex marriage
Recognition of same-sex unions in Europe
Marriage privatization
Civil union
Domestic partnership
Listings by country

LGBT portal
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Since June 4, 2001, the Canadian province of Nova Scotia has offered Domestic partnership registration to unmarried couples, both same-sex and different-sex, thereby entitling them to some, but not all, of the rights and benefits of marriage.

Contents

Legislation

In the previous year, the General Assembly passed the Law Reform (2000) Act, the full title of which is "An Act to Comply with Certain Court Decisions and to Modernize and Reform Laws in the Province." The act was passed in the wake of the landmark decision of the Supreme Court of Canada in the case of M. v. H. on May 19, 1999.

In the first six months after the law came into effect, only 94 domestic partnerships were registered, in contrast to about 5500 marriages per year in the province. Of the 94 partnerships, 83 (88%) were same-sex couples.[1]

Rights and Benefits

At the time the 2000 act was passed, domestic partners who registered with the provincial authorities were entitled to the same rights and obligations as spouses under the following laws:

  • the Fatal Injuries Act
  • the Health Act
  • the Hospitals Act
  • the Insurance Act
  • the Intestate Succession Act
  • the Maintenance and Custody Act
  • the Matrimonial Property Act
  • the Members' Retiring Allowances Act
  • the Pension Benefits Act
  • the Probate Act
  • the Provincial Court Act, or
  • or as a widow or widower under the Testators' Family Maintenance Act

Registration

Unmarried adults over age 19 in a conjugal relationship, not party to another domestic partnership, who live in Nova Scotia or own property there may file a declaration of domestic partnership with the Nova Scotia Vital Statistics Agency. By registering, the couple immediately gains the family court legal recognition, rights and benefits available to common law spouses under provincial law.

Termination

Domestic partnerships in Nova Scotia may be terminated in one of the following ways:

  • both parties jointly file a Statement of Termination with Vital Statistics
  • one party files an affidavit with Vital Statistics that the couple have lived separate and apart for more than a year
  • the parties enter into a separation agreement pursuant to the Maintenance and Custody Act and file proof of such an agreement with Vital Statistics
  • one of the parties files with Vital Statistics proof of marriage to a third party, which automatically ends the domestic partnership

See also

References

  1. ^ Final Report of the Review Panel on Common-Law Relationships to the Attorney General of Manitoba, 2001

External links


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