Mitogaku


Mitogaku

Mitogaku refers to a school of Japanese historical and Shinto studies that arose in the Mito domain, in modern-day Ibaraki prefecture.

The school had its genesis in 1657 when Tokugawa Mitsukuni (1628-1700), second head of the Mito domain, commissioned the compilation of the Dai Nihon-shi (History of Great Japan). Among scholars gathered for the project were Asaka Tanpaku (1656-1737), Sassa Munekiyo (1640-1698), Kuriyama Senpō (1671-1706), and Miyake Kanran (1673-1718).

The fundamental approach of the project was Neo-Confucianist, based on the view that historical development followed moral laws. Tokugawa Mitsukuni believed that Japan, as a nation that had long been under the unified rule of the emperor, was a perfect exemplar of a "nation" as understood in Sinocentric thought. The Dai Nihon-shi thus became a history of Japan as ruled by the emperors and emphasised respect for the imperial court and Shinto deities.

In order to record historical facts, the school's historians gathered local historical sources, often compiling their own historical works in the process. Early Mitogaku scholarship was focused on historiography and scholarly work.

Around the end of the eighteenth century, Mitogaku came to address contemporary social and political issues, beginning the era of Later Mitogaku. The ninth Mito clan leader, Tokugawa Nariaki (1800-1860), greatly expanded Mitogaku by establishing the Kōdōkan as the clan school. In addition to Confucianist and kokugaku thought, the school also absorbed knowledge from medicine, astronomy and other natural sciences.

The Later Mitogaku era lasted until the Bakumatsu period. The school exerted a major influence on the Sonnō jōi movement and became one of the driving forces behind the Meiji Restoration. However, it failed to gain the protection of the new government and the Kōdōkan was disbanded and its library largely taken over by the state.

The Mito-shi Gakkai of Mito city, Ibaraki prefecture, is undertaking research into the historical and ideological aspects of Mitogaku.

Major works of the school include Shintō shūsei, Dai Nihon Jingi Shi, and Jingi Shiryō, and collections and studies of fudoki and studies of the Kogo Shūi.


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Mitogaku — Die Mitogaku (jap. 水戸学; zu Deutsch etwa „Mito Schule“) war eine konfuzianisch bzw. neokonfuzianisch und shintōisch ausgerichtete Schule von Gelehrten und Intellektuellen, die im Mito han organisiert war, einem Lehen, das durch einen der drei… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mito-Schule — Die Mitogaku (jap. 水戸学; zu Deutsch etwa „Mito Schule“) war eine konfuzianisch bzw. neokonfuzianisch und shintōisch ausgerichtete Schule von Gelehrten und Intellektuellen, die im Mito han (水戸藩) organisiert war, einem Lehen, das durch einen der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mitoschule — Die Mitogaku (jap. 水戸学; zu Deutsch etwa „Mito Schule“) war eine konfuzianisch bzw. neokonfuzianisch und shintōisch ausgerichtete Schule von Gelehrten und Intellektuellen, die im Mito han (水戸藩) organisiert war, einem Lehen, das durch einen der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mito Domain — Mito (水戸藩, Mito han?) was a prominent feudal domain (han) in Japan during the Edo period. Its capital was the city of Mito, and it covered much of present day Ibaraki Prefecture. Beginning with the appointment of Tokugawa Yorifusa by his father,… …   Wikipedia

  • Japanese philosophy — has historically been a fusion of both foreign and indigenous Japanese elements (such as Shinto). [ [http://www.rep.routledge.com/article/G100/ Japanese philosophy : Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online ] ] Formerly heavily influenced by… …   Wikipedia

  • Neo-Konfuzianismus — Der Neokonfuzianismus ist eine religiös philosophische Lehre, die während der chinesischen Song Dynastie entstand und deren Ursprünge im Konfuzianismus liegen, die jedoch auch starke Einflüsse aus Buddhismus und Daoismus aufweist. Der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Neukonfuzianismus — Der Neokonfuzianismus ist eine religiös philosophische Lehre, die während der chinesischen Song Dynastie entstand und deren Ursprünge im Konfuzianismus liegen, die jedoch auch starke Einflüsse aus Buddhismus und Daoismus aufweist. Der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sonno-joi — Sonnō jōi (jap. 尊皇攘夷 oder 尊王攘夷) war eine japanische politische Philosophie und soziale Bewegung mit Ursprung im Neokonfuzianismus. In den 1850ern/1860ern wurde es zum politischem Slogan einer Bewegung, die das Tokugawa Shōgunat beseitigen wollte …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sonno joi — Sonnō jōi (jap. 尊皇攘夷 oder 尊王攘夷) war eine japanische politische Philosophie und soziale Bewegung mit Ursprung im Neokonfuzianismus. In den 1850ern/1860ern wurde es zum politischem Slogan einer Bewegung, die das Tokugawa Shōgunat beseitigen wollte …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sonnojoi — Sonnō jōi (jap. 尊皇攘夷 oder 尊王攘夷) war eine japanische politische Philosophie und soziale Bewegung mit Ursprung im Neokonfuzianismus. In den 1850ern/1860ern wurde es zum politischem Slogan einer Bewegung, die das Tokugawa Shōgunat beseitigen wollte …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.