Launch (boat)


Launch (boat)

A launch in contemporary usage refers to "a large motorboat". [ [http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/launch_2?view=uk AskOxford: launch2 ] ]

The name originally referred to the largest boat carried by a warship. The etymology of the word is given as Portuguese "lancha" "barge", from Malay "lancha", "lancharan", "boat," from lanchar "velocity without effort," "action of gliding smoothly" (said primarily of boats and turtles).

Military launches

Motor Launch was the designation for large (typically 60 to 115 feet long) vessels used in the Second World War by the Royal Navy and some other navies. They were used for inshore work in defending the coast from submarines and carried relatively light armament: a few depth charges, a gun and a few machine guns.

References

ee also

*RAF Rescue Launch
*Cabin cruiser
*List of Spanish words of Austronesian origin


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  • Launch — may refer to:In boating: *Launch (boat), a large motor boat *Motor Launch (ML), a small military vessel used by the Royal Navy *Ship naming and launching, when a ship or boat is dispatched from a slipway, prior to fitting out and commissioningIn… …   Wikipedia

  • launch — English has two separate words launch. The verb, ‘propel’ [14], is related to lance. Lances are propelled by throwing, and so the derived Old French verb lancier was used for ‘throw’. English acquired it via the Anglo Norman form launcher. The… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • launch — English has two separate words launch. The verb, ‘propel’ [14], is related to lance. Lances are propelled by throwing, and so the derived Old French verb lancier was used for ‘throw’. English acquired it via the Anglo Norman form launcher. The… …   Word origins

  • launch — Ⅰ. launch [1] ► VERB 1) move (a boat or ship) from land into the water. 2) send out or hurl (a rocket or other missile). 3) begin (an enterprise) or introduce (a new product). 4) (launch into) begin energetically and enthusiastically. ► …   English terms dictionary

  • Launch 5 — is a restored NYPD Patrol Launch presently in use as a US Coast Guard Auxiliary Facility as well as for volunteer non profit environmental, public safety and educational work. Launch 5 enjoys a rich history beginning with her construction and… …   Wikipedia

  • Launch — Launch, n. 1. The act of launching. [1913 Webster] 2. The movement of a vessel from land into the water; especially, the sliding on ways from the stocks on which it is built. [1913 Webster] 3. [Cf. Sp. lancha.] (Naut.) The boat of the largest… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • launch — launch1 [lônch] vt. [ME launchen < OFr lanchier < LL(Ec) lanceare, to wield a lance < L lancea, LANCE] 1. to hurl, discharge, or send off (a weapon, blow, etc.) 2. to send forth with some force [to launch a plane by catapult] 3. to cause …   English World dictionary

  • boat — [n] vehicle for water travel ark, barge, bark, bateau, bottom, bucket, canoe, catamaran, craft, dinghy, dory, hulk, ketch, launch, lifeboat, pinnace, raft, sailboat, schooner, scow, ship, skiff, sloop, steamboat, tub, yacht; concept 506 …   New thesaurus

  • launch — launch1 W2 [lo:ntʃ US lo:ntʃ] v [T] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(start something)¦ 2¦(product)¦ 3¦(boat)¦ 4¦(sky/space)¦ 5¦(computer)¦ 6 launch yourself forwards/up/from etc Phrasal verbs  launch into something  launch out ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • launch — 1 verb (T) 1 START STH to start something, especially an official, public, or military activity that has been carefully planned: launch a campaign/appeal/inquiry: Police have launched a murder enquiry following the discovery of a woman s body. |… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English