North Marion High School (West Virginia)


North Marion High School (West Virginia)
North Marion High School
Main Building
Location
1 North Marion Drive
Farmington, WV, 26571
USA United States
Information
School type Public coeducational
Established 1979
School district Marion County
Superintendent Thomas K. Deadrick
Dean Mike McNeil
Principal Rusty DeVito
Vice principal Earl Shaffer
Grades 9-12
Enrolment 714[1]
Color(s) Black, Silver
Slogan "Husky Pride"
Athletics conference Big Ten
Mascot Husky
Feeder schools Mannington Middle School

Monongah Middle School
Barrackville Middle School
Fairview Middle School

Main Office (304) 986-3063
NMHS Seal

North Marion High School is a public Triple A ("AAA") high school in West Virginia, with a current enrollment of 905 students.[1]

North Marion High School is located approximately 4 miles from Farmington, West Virginia on US Route 250 north. While it is closer to the city of Mannington, West Virginia, and is often considered to be located in Rachel, West Virginia, the school mailing address is Farmington. Rachel is a small coal mining community located adjacent to the school, and is an unincorporated municipality.

North Marion High School is represented as "Grantville High School" in the popular alternative history novel 1632 (novel) by writer Eric Flint. The novel is set in the fictional town of Grantville, which is based on the real town and surroundings of Mannington. [2]

Contents

History

North Marion High School was completed and opened in September, 1979, and, with over 1,600 students, was at the time one of the largest high schools in West Virginia. The school is a consolidated high school (grades 9 through 12) made up of four former high schools that closed in the consolidation: Barrackville, Monongah, Mannington and Fairview. Farmington High School, which closed in 1975 because of structural problems caused by mine subsidence, is often considered to be part of the consolidated group (even though it had been closed prior to the building of the new school). The four former high schools were converted to middle schools, with all four buildings remaining in current use.

Nickname & Colors

North Marion students, teams and alumni are known as Huskies. The school colors are black and silver. The mascot and colors were chosen by the students of the various consolidated high schools in an election in the spring of 1979.

Athletics

After completion of the original facility, the building process continued sporadically. A local group calling themselves the "Wood Cutters" completed, with mostly volunteer labor and materials, the addition of a facilities building, football stadium, practice field and softball field. Without the work and efforts of the volunteers, many of the improvements of the school would not have been possible and the continued improvement of the grounds has become a source of community pride. The school continues to enjoy strong local fan and booster support.

North Marion has been known for its outstanding athletic teams including 1980, 1981 and 1997 Class AAA Football Championships, the 1999 Class AAA Men's Basketball Championship and 2009, 2010, and 2011 Class AAA Women's Basketball Championship.

North Marion State Championship History [2]
Boys' Sports State Titles Girls' Sports State Titles
Baseball Softball
Basketball 1999 Basketball 2009, 2010, 2011
Cross Country 1992, 1994, 1995, 2005 Cross Country 1993
Golf Cheerleading 1988, 1990, 1994, 1995
Football 1980, 1981, 1997 Volleyball
Soccer Soccer
Swimming Swimming
Tennis Tennis
Track & Field Track & Field
Wrestling 1998
Boys' Total 9 Girls' Total 8

Notable alumni

Rich Rodriguez, 1981 graduate: Former West Virginia University football player and head coach; Former head football coach for the University of Michigan [3].

Natalie Tennant, 1986 graduate: First female to represent West Virginia University as the Mountaineer Mascot; Prominent television anchor and reporter, working in both the Clarksburg and Charleston television markets; Current WV Secretary of State, elected in 2008.

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.