Lord Justice Clerk


Lord Justice Clerk

The Lord Justice Clerk is the second most senior Judge in Scotland, behind the Lord President of the Court of Session.

The holder has the title in both the Court of Session and the High Court of Justiciary and is in charge of the Second Division of Judges in the Court of Session. The office is one of the Great Officers of State in Scotland.

History

Originally "clericus justiciarie" or Clerk to the Court of Justiciary, the counterpart in the criminal courts of the Lord Clerk Register, the status of the office increased over time and the Justice-Clerk came to claim a seat on the Bench by practice and custom. This was recognised by the Privy Council of Scotland in 1663 and the Lord Justice-Clerk became the effective head of the reformed High Court of Justiciary in 1672 when the court was reconstituted.

The Lord Justice Clerk now rarely presides at criminal trials in the High Court, with most of his time being spent dealing with civil and criminal appeals and appeals against the grant or refusal of bail.

Office-holders

"partial list"
* William de Camera - Justice-Clerk to David II (1324-71)
* Adam Forester
* 1426: James de Lawedre (d. after 1459)
* 1478: William Halket of Belsico
* 1491: Richard Lawson of Heirigs
* 1507: James Henderson of Fordel
* 1513: James Wishhart of Pittarrow
* 1524: Nicholas Crawfurd of Oxengangs
* 1537: Adam Otterurn of Reidhall
* 1537: Thomas Scot of Pitgorn
* 1539: Thomas Bellenden of Auchole
* 1540: Henry Balneaves
* 1547: Sir John Bellenden of Auchnole & Broughton (d.1576)
* 1577: Sir Lewis Bellenden of Auchnole & Broughton (d.1591)
* 1591: Sir John Cockburn of Ormiston, Lord Ormiston (d.1623)
* 1625: Sir George Elphinston of Blythswood
* 1634: Sir James Carmichael of the Ilk
* 1637: Sir John Hamilton of Orbiston
* 1651: Sir Robert Moray
* 1663: Sir John Home, of Renton, Lord Renton
* 1671: Sir James Lockhart of Lee (d. June 4, 1674)
* 1674: Sir William Lockhart of Lee
* 1675: Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie, Lord Craigie
* 1680: Richard Maitland, 4th Earl of Lauderdale
* 1684: Sir James Foulis of Colinton, Lord Colinton
* 1688: Sir John Dalrymple, 1st Earl of Stair
* 1690: Sir Alexander (or George) Campbell of Cessnock, Lord Cessnock
* 1692: Sir Adam Cockburn of Ormiston, Lord Ormiston
* 1699: Sir John Maxwell of Pollok, Lord Pollok
* 1702: Roderick Mackenzie of Prestonhall, Lord Prestonhall
* 1704: Sir William Hamilton of Whitelaw, Lord Whitelaw
* 1705: Sir Adam Cockburn of Ormiston, Lord Ormiston
* 1710: Sir James Erskine, Lord Grange
* 1714: Sir Adam Cockburn of Ormiston, Lord Ormiston
* 1735: Andrew Fletcher, Lord Milton
* 1748: Charles Erskine, Lord Tinwald
* 1763: Gilbert Eliot, Lord Minto
* 1766: Thomas Miller, Lord Glenlee
* 1787: Robert Macqueen, Lord Braxfield
* 1799: David Rae, Lord Eskgrove
* 1804: Charles Hope, Lord Granton
* 1811: David Boyle, Lord Boyle
* 1841: John Hope
* 1858: John Inglis, Lord Glencorse
* 1867: George Patton, Lord Glenalmond
* 1869: James Moncreiff, Lord Moncreiff
* 1888: John Macdonald, Lord Kingsburgh
* 1915: Charles Dickson, Lord Dickson
* 1922: Robert Munro, Lord Alness
* 1933: Craigie Aitchison, Lord Aitchison
* 1941: Thomas Cooper, Lord Cooper
* 1947: George Thomson, Lord Thomson
* 1962: William Grant, Lord Grant
* 1972: John Wheatley, Baron Wheatley
* 1985: Donald Ross, Lord Ross
* 1997: William Cullen, Lord Cullencite web|url=http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page2750.asp|title=Scottish Judicial Appointments|date=2001-11-13|publisher=10 Downing Street|accessdate=2008-07-16]
* 2001: Brian Gill, Lord Gill

References

*For listings to 1637 (may be wanting) refer "The Staggering State of the Scots' Statesmen", by Sir John Scot of Scotstarvet, Director of Chancery, Edinburgh, 1754, p.183.


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lord justice clerk — Lord Lord, n. [OE. lord, laverd, loverd, AS. hl[=a]ford, for hl[=a]fweard, i. e., bread keeper; hl[=a]f bread, loaf + weardian to look after, to take care of, to ward. See {Loaf}, and {Ward} to guard, and cf. {Laird}, {Lady}.] 1. One who has… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lord Justice-Clerk — The Scottish judge ranking next to the Lord Justice General, presiding over the Second Division of the Inner House of the Court of Session, vice president of the High Court of Justiciary • • • Main Entry: ↑justice …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lord Justice Clerk — Scotland s second ranking judge. In criminal matters he is second to the Lord Justice General and in civil matters presides over the second division of the Inner House, the appellate division of the Court of Session. Collins dictionary of law. W …   Law dictionary

  • lord justice clerk — noun (plural lord justice clerks) : justice clerk …   Useful english dictionary

  • lord justice clerk — The second highest judicial officer in Scotland …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • John Bellenden (Lord Justice Clerk) — Sir John Bellenden of Auchnole and Broughton (died 1 October 1576), was, before 1544, Director of Chancery in Scotland, and was appointed Lord Justice Clerk on 25 June 1547. He was also knighted before April 1544.Sir John Bellenden was a… …   Wikipedia

  • Lord justice general — Lord Lord, n. [OE. lord, laverd, loverd, AS. hl[=a]ford, for hl[=a]fweard, i. e., bread keeper; hl[=a]f bread, loaf + weardian to look after, to take care of, to ward. See {Loaf}, and {Ward} to guard, and cf. {Laird}, {Lady}.] 1. One who has… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • justice clerk — noun (plural justice clerks) Etymology: Middle English : the vice president of the High Court of Justiciary and the presiding officer of the Outer House of the Court of Session in Scotland called also lord justice clerk …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lord Ordinary — is a term used to describe any judge in the Outer House of the Scottish Court of Session. v · Court of Session …   Wikipedia

  • Lord — Lord, n. [OE. lord, laverd, loverd, AS. hl[=a]ford, for hl[=a]fweard, i. e., bread keeper; hl[=a]f bread, loaf + weardian to look after, to take care of, to ward. See {Loaf}, and {Ward} to guard, and cf. {Laird}, {Lady}.] 1. One who has power and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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