A1 road (London)


A1 road (London)

UK road routebox
road= A1


caption= The current route of the A1 (red) and the historic route of the Great North Road (blue)
length-mi=
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direction= North - South
start= City of London
destinations= Holloway
end= Bignell's Corner
construction-date=
completion-date=
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The A1 in London is an A road in North London. It runs from the London Wall to Bignall's Corner, where it crosses the M25 and becomes the A1(M) motorway, continuing to Edinburgh. (For the road outside London, see the main A1 road article.) The London section passes through 4 London Boroughs: the City of London, Islington, Haringey and Barnet. Whilst the route of the A1 outside London closely follows the historic route of the Great North Road, the London section for the most part does not.

The current route of the London section of the A1 road was (for the most part) designated as such in 1927. It comprises a number of historic streets in central London and the former suburbs of Islington, Holloway and Highgate and long stretches of purpose-built new roads in the outer London borough of Barnet, built to divert traffic away from the congested suburbs of Finchley and High Barnet.

The London section of the A1 is one of London's most important roads. It links North London to the M1 motorway and the A1 (M) motorway, and consequently serves as Central London's primary road transport artery to the Midlands, Northern England and Scotland. It also connects a number of major areas within London, and sections of it serve as the High Street for many of the now-joined villages that make up north London.

t John Street (historic)

St John Street was the first section of the original route of the "Great North Road" and initially formed part of the A1; however, it no longer forms part of the present route, which runs some way to the east. It is a well-known London street, located in Clerkenwell, Islington. It runs from Smithfield Market and Charterhouse Street in the south to the junction of City Road and Pentonville Road (near Upper Street) in the north, close to the Angel tube station.

The Red Bull Theatre was located on the street between 1604 and 1666, when it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London.
James Burnett, Lord Monboddo (1714–1799) lived at 13 St John Street. He held "learned suppers" at his house, with guests including James Boswell, Robert Burns and Samuel Johnson.

Nowadays there are many office buildings, restaurants and bars.

Aldersgate Street

The site of the now-demolished Aldersgate in the London Wall, next to the Museum of London, is the present start of the A1. Aldersgate Street runs north from here to the northern border of the City of London, where it becomes Goswell Road.

Adjacent to the modern roundabout on the site of the Aldersgate is the former headquarters of the General Post Office (closed in 1910 and demolished shortly afterwards), and the adjoining Postman's Park. The southern part of the roundabout and the northern part of the Post Office site stand on the site of a collegiate church and sanctuary founded in 750 by Withu, King of Kent, hugely expanded in 1056 by Ingebrian, Earl of Essex and issued with a Royal Charter in 1068 by William the Conqueror. The site of the church was cleared in 1818 in preparation for the construction of the Post Office. [cite journal
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Aldersgate Street and St Martin-le-Grand
journal =Old and New London
volume =2
issue =
pages =208–28
publisher =Centre for Metropolitan History
date =1878
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=45092
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-10
]

The poet Thomas Flatman was born in a house in Aldersgate Street in 1633. As with most historic buildings on this stretch of road, the building no longer stands.

's House". [cite book
last =Winter
first =William
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Seeing Europe with Famous Authors: Literary Shrines of London
publisher =Moffat, Yard & Co
date =1910
location =London
pages =
url =http://www.publishingcentral.com/library/europe-with-authors-1_16.html
doi =
id =
] Although the building was very close to the nearby Fortune Playhouse, there is no documentary evidence surviving to indicate that Shakespeare resided here; a subsidy roll from 1598 shows a "William Shakespeare" as owner of the property, but there is nothing to indicate that it is the playwright. The building no longer exists, and Barbican tube station now occupies the site. The nearby Shakespeare Tower is named for this (tenuous) connection.

Barbican tube station was originally named "Aldersgate Street" when it opened in 1865. It was renamed "Aldersgate" in 1910, "Aldersgate and Barbican" in 1923, and "Barbican" in 1968. [cite web
last =Williams
first =Hywel
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Renamed Stations
work =
publisher =London Underground History
date =2004
url =http://underground-history.co.uk/renames.php
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-10
]

Most of the buildings on Aldersgate Street were destroyed or badly damaged in World War II. The entire length of the eastern side of the street is now occupied by the huge 40 acre (162,000m²) Barbican residential and arts complex. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History of the Barbican Estate
work =
publisher =City of London Corporation
date =
url =http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/Corporation/our_services/barbican_estate/history.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-10
]

John Wesley

in Aldersgate Street. While attending the meeting, he underwent a profound religious experience, describing it in his journal thus:quotation|"In the evening I went unwillingly to a society in Aldersgate Street, where one was reading Luther's preface to the Epistle to the Romans. About a quarter to nine, while he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. I felt I did trust in Christ, Christ alone for salvation, and an assurance was given me that he had taken away my sins, even mine and saved me from the law of sin and death." [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History of the Church
work =
publisher =The Methodist Church of Great Britain
date =2007
url =http://www.methodist.org.uk/index.cfm?fuseaction=welcome.content&cmid=12
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-10
]
This moment was for Wesley an awakening to the assurance found in salvation by grace alone and has been referred to by scholars as a defining moment in the Methodist movement.

In 1739 Wesley broke with the Moravians and founded the Methodist Society of England. In the following years, the Methodist church spread rapidly, becoming one of the most influential Christian denominations in the world, particularly in the United States and the British Empire. A memorial at the believed site of the Moravian chapel (its exact address is not known, but it is believed to have been at 28 Aldersgate Street) marks the site of the meeting, and Wesley's Chapel in nearby City Road remains a major focal point of the international Methodist movement.

Goswell Road

Goswell Road is a road in the south of the London Borough of Islington. It runs north from the border of the City of London to The Angel. There is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called 'Goswelle' or 'Goderell' which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Goswell Road
work =
publisher =Golden Lane Estate
date =
url =http://www.goldenlane.co.uk/history/goswell_road.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-10
] whilst others state it derives from "God's Well", and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Smithfield Fair
work =
publisher =Barbican Living
date =
url =http://www.barbicanliving.co.uk/history/periods/smithfield.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-11
]

It is mostly occupied by offices and shops, and by the main campus of City University. It also contains the central library of the Society of Genealogists, one of London's most important reference collections [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =A Guide to History Libraries and Collections in London
work =
publisher =University of London Library
date =
url =http://www.ull.ac.uk/his/sgl.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-11
] and the Headquarters of EWS Railways at 310 Goswell Road.

The New River originally passed along Goswell Road before turning to terminate at New River Head on Rosebery Avenue. [cite journal
last =Croot
first =Patricia
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington Introduction
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =8
issue =
pages =1–3
publisher =British History Online
date =1985
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=8471
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-11
] The course of the river at this point is now entirely underground, and no trace of it can be seen at the surface.

James Parrott and the four-minute mile

Some sources (notably Olympic medallist Peter Radford [Citation
last =Radford
first =Peter
author-link =Peter Radford
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =The Time a Land Forgot
newspaper =The Guardian
pages =
year =
date =2004-05-02
url =http://sport.guardian.co.uk/athletics/comment/0,10083,1207844,00.html
] ) contend that Goswell Road was the starting point for the first successful four-minute mile run, by James Parrott on 9 May 1770. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The first four-minute mile
work =
publisher =East London History
date =2004
url =http://www.eastlondonhistory.com/four%20minute%20mile.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-11
Dead link|date=August 2008
] Parrott's route began on Goswell Road, before turning down Old Street, finishing at St Leonard's, Shoreditch. Although timing methods at this time were accurate enough, following the invention of the chronometer by John Harrison, to measure the four minutes correctly, and sporting authorities of the time accepted the claim as genuine, the record is not recognised by modern sporting bodies. [Citation
last =Radford
first =Peter
author-link =Peter Radford
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Runners of Old are Hard to Beat
newspaper =Edinburgh Evening News
pages =
year =
date =2004-05-06
url =http://edinburghnews.scotsman.com/sport.cfm?id=516202004
Dead link|date=August 2008
]

The Dame Alice Owen's School bombing

On 15 October 1940, approximately 150 people were sheltering in the basement of Dame Alice Owen's School, then situated on Goswell Road. A large parachute bomb hit the building directly, causing the structure to collapse and blocking access to the basement. The blast wave from the bomb caused the pipeline carrying the New River to rupture, flooding the shelter and killing the majority of shelterers. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Unveiling of Memorial to the Victims of the London Blitz
work =
publisher =Dame Alice Owen's School
date =
url =http://www.school-portal.co.uk/GroupRenderCustomPage.asp?GroupID=64099&ResourceId=238992
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-11
]

A memorial to the victims of the bombing stands in Owen's Fields at the northern end of Goswell Road.

Islington High Street

Islington High Street is, as the name suggests, the former High Street of the village of Islington, now completely subsumed by London. Only a very short section of this road between City Road and Liverpool Road is designated as part of the A1.

The earliest reference to Islington High Street is its appearance on a 1590 map of the area. At this time, nine inns (including the famous Angel, which has subsequently given its name to the area), as well as housing and a public pond were shown lining the street. [cite journal
last =Croot
first =Patricia
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington Growth
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =8
issue =
pages =9–19
publisher =British History Online
date =1985
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=6734
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-11
] Then as now, Islington was and is unusual in that the village church, St. Mary's, does not stand on the high street but is some way off on Upper Street.

In 1716 Islington High Street came under the control of the newly-formed Islington Turnpike Trust. The Trust grew rapidly, and soon had control of most major roads in the area, building a number of major road arteries through the expanding residential areas, including Caledonian Road, Euston Road, City Road and New North Road. [cite journal
last =Croot
first =Patricia
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington Communications
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =8
issue =
pages =3–8
publisher =British History Online
date =1985
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=7111
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-11
]

The Peacock Inn at 11 Islington High Street dates from 1564, although the current facade dates from 1857. It featured in "Tom Brown's Schooldays" as the inn at which Tom stays prior to travelling to Rugby. It closed in 1962, although the building still stands. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Places of Note
work =
publisher =London Borough of Islington
date =
url =http://www.islington.gov.uk/Education/LocalHistory/BriefBoroughHistory/415.asp
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-11
]

Angel tube station on Islington High Street has the longest escalator on the London Underground system, at 318 steps. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =London Underground Statistics
work =
publisher =Tube Prune
date =2003-04-21
url =http://www.trainweb.org/tubeprune/Statistics.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-11
] In 2006 a Norwegian man made headlines after skiing down the escalator at the station [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Tube Ski Stunt Blasted by Police
work =
publisher =BBC
date =2007-03-28
url =http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/6501897.stm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
]

Upper Street

.

The hilltop village of Islington originally consisted of two streets in addition to the High Street: Upper Street and Lower Street, which diverged from the High Street at Islington Green and both date back to at least the 12th century. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =1811-Medieval Origins
work =
publisher =BBC
date =
url =http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/local_history/city/street_01.shtml?origins
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] Henry VIII hunted duck in the ponds off Upper Street, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Local Area
work =
publisher =City University
date =
url =http://www.city.ac.uk/hr/general_info/local.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] while Walter Raleigh lived in Upper Street and owned a pub in Lower Street. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington
work =
publisher =My Islington
date =
url =http://www.bmh54.freeuk.com/places/islington/islington.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] Lower Street has since been renamed Essex Road.

St. Mary's Church, Islington was built in 1754 [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =1811: The church as focal point
work =
publisher =BBC
date =
url =http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/local_history/city/street_01.shtml?church
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] and dominates the Islington skyline. It is still in use today, and is a major venue for performances of traditional religious music. The Little Angel Theatre is a children's puppet theatre in a former Temperance hall, behind the church.

Directly opposite St. Mary's Church is The King's Head Theatre, founded in 1970 by the late Dan Crawford. It was the first pub theatre in the UK, located in the back room behind the bar at the King's Head pub on Upper Street.

The fields around Upper Street, with their close proximity to the growing city of London, were a major farming area. Islington was the home of the Royal Agricultural Hall, and a number of pubs and shops existed along the street to serve farmers and visitors to the hall. [cite web
last =Richardson
first =John
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History of Islington
work =
publisher =My Islington
date =
url =http://www.myislington.co.uk/islington/community-history.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
]

In the 18th century Upper Street began to be redeveloped from an agricultural to a residential area. Ten houses were built in 1768 (later named Hornsey Row), and a further group built immediately south of Hornsey Row in 1792. [cite journal
last =Croot
first =Patricia
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington Growth - Canonbury
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =8
issue =
pages =19–20
publisher =British History Online
date =1985
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=275
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] William Roxby Beverley, the first mathematician to solve the problem of a "magic knight's tour" (a variant on the knight's tour in which the numbered steps form a magic square) resided in these buildings, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History of Magic Knight's Tours
work =
publisher =Knight's Tour Notes
date =
url =http://www.ktn.freeuk.com/1d.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] now replaced by Islington Town Hall.

In recent years it has become extremely fashionable, and contains numerous pubs and restaurants, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =2001: Restaurant culture
work =
publisher =BBC
date =
url =http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/local_history/city/street_03.shtml?restaurant
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] including the now closed Granita where Tony Blair and Gordon Brown were said to have made their deal on leadership once the Labour Party won power. [Citation
last =Happold
first =Tom
author-link =
last2 =Maguire
first2 =Kevin
author2-link =
title =Revealed: Brown and Blair's Pact
newspaper =The Guardian
pages =
year =
date =2003-06-06
url =http://politics.guardian.co.uk/labour/story/0,,971669,00.html
] The southern end of Upper Street also houses the Mall Antiques Arcade, built from a derelict tram shed in 1979, and now one of the world's largest collections of antiques dealers; [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History of the Mall Antiques Arcade
work =
publisher =The Mall, Islington
date =
url =http://www.mallantiques.co.uk/History.cfm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] there is also an antiques market nearby at Camden Passage.

Upper Street was one of the settings for local resident [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Authors & Illustrators
work =
publisher =London Borough of Islington
date =
url =http://www.islington.gov.uk/Leisure/LocalHistory/FamousResidents/420.asp
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. The London-based sections of the later books are set in and around Upper Street, the home address of "Fenchurch". [cite web
last =Maul
first =Mathias
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Ultra-Complete Index to the Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy
work =
publisher =
date =1994-03-12
url =http://www.zootle.net/afda/faq/guide1.shtml
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] In addition, the character of Hotblack Desiato is named after a local estate agent. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Company
work =
publisher =Hotblack Desiato
date =2002
url =http://www.hotblackdesiato.co.uk/page/company
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
]

Places of interest on Upper Street

was recorded here. The building is still in use as a music venue today. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Hope and Anchor
work =
publisher =Bugbear Bookings
date =
url =http://www.bugbearbookings.com/pages/ha.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
]

Upper Street is unusual in being one of the few streets in London (along with adjoining Liverpool Road) to have a "high pavement". This was constructed to protect pedestrians from being splashed by the large numbers of animals using the road to reach the Royal Agricultural Hall; as a consequence, the pavement of the street is approximately 1 m above the road surface for some of the length of the street. [cite web
last =Corby
first =Chris
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Angel Town Centre Strategy
work =
publisher =London Borough of Islington
date =2004-03
url =http://www.islington.gov.uk/downloadabledocuments/environment/pdf/angeltowncentrestrategy.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
]

In 2005 Islington Council launched "Technology Mile", a project to turn Upper Street in a large scale wi-fi hotspot. Using routers mounted on lampposts anyone with a wireless enabled device can connect to Council services and the internet the entire length of Upper Street, although the best signal is found in the Islington Green/St. Mary's church areas.

Upper Street and the radical left

In the 1970s & 80s Upper Street was a focal point of the radical left. It was home to Sisterwrite, Britain's first feminist bookshop, as well as the Trotskyist Pioneer Books, the anarchist Rising Free shop (famous for stealing stock from other shops to sell in theirs) and the socialist Red Books. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Radical Bookshop History
work =
publisher =Five Leaves Publications
date =
url =http://www.fiveleaves.co.uk/radical_bookselling.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] In the 1980s, Upper Street was home to the Islington Action Group for the Unwaged, a major far left campaigning and activist group, and to the squatter-run Molly's Cafe, a focal point for the anarchist and squatting movement. [cite web
last =Marut
first =Ret
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Unwaged fightback - A history of Islington Action Group of the Unwaged - 1980-86
work =
publisher =Libcom.org
date =2006-10-30
url =http://libcom.org/library/unwaged-fightback-a-history-of-islington-action-group-of-the-unwaged-1980-86
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
] Upper Street made headlines on 23 July 1995, when the Reclaim the Streets movement took over the street, barricaded it to traffic and held a long party in the street. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Reclaim the Streets II
work =
publisher =Urban75
date =2003
url =http://www.urban75.org/photos/protest/rts01.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-12
]

Holloway Road

After reaching the eight-way Highbury Corner interchange, the A1 turns north-west as Holloway Road. The origins of the name are disputed; some believe that it derives from Hollow due to the dip in the road, whilst some believe it derives from Hallow and refers to the road's historic significance as part of the pilgrimage route to Walsingham. No documentary evidence can be found to support either derivation.

Holloway Road is one of north London's most important shopping streets, containing major Waitrose, Morrisons, Marks & Spencer, James Selby and Argos stores as well as numerous smaller shops. Holloway Road is the site of the main campus of the much-renamed London Metropolitan University (formerly Northern Polytechnic Institute, Polytechnic of North London and University of North London), [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History
work =
publisher =London Metropolitan University
date =
url =http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/about/history.cfm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-13
] probably best known for its striking deconstructivist Orion Building, designed by Daniel Libeskind, which dominates the central stretch of Holloway Road, [cite web
last =Libeskind
first =Daniel
authorlink =Daniel Libeskind
coauthors =
title =London Metropolitan University Graduate Centre
work =
publisher =Daniel Libeskind
date =2003
url =http://www.daniel-libeskind.com/projects/pro.html?ID=44
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-13
] and of the headquarters of the National Union of Students [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The National Union of Students
work =
publisher =The Guardian
date =
url =http://politics.guardian.co.uk/studentpolitics/page/0,,584038,00.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-19
] and the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =CND National Contacts
work =
publisher =Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament
date =
url =http://www.cnduk.org/pages/ctc/nat.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-19
] Most of the shops are clustered in the Nag's Head area, near the junction with Seven Sisters Road.

The earliest record giving the name of the road as The Holloway dates from 1307. The main stretch of Holloway Road runs through the site of the villages of Tollington and Stroud. The exact time of their founding is not known, but the earliest record of them dates from 1000. The names ceased to be used by the late 17th century, but are still preserved in the local place names "Tollington Park" and "Stroud Green"; [cite journal
last =Croot
first =Patricia
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington Growth: Holloway and Tollington
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =8
issue =
pages =29–37
publisher =British History Online
date =1985
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=1374
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-13
] since that time, the area has been known as Holloway.

rate. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Illegal Cigarettes Campaign at Nags Head on Holloway Road
work =
publisher =Smoke Free Islington
date =2006-12-11
url =http://www.smokefreeislington.nhs.uk/pages/go.asp?pageID=691&Path=10&Parent=689.0734&instance=736
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-13
]

The northern point of Holloway Road is the complex interchange at Archway, where the A1 leaves the historic route of the Great North Road. The traditional Great North Road heads northeast up Highgate Hill (now the B519) before turning north at Highgate to cross the current A1 route. The A1 heads north along the relatively recently built Archway Road. The construction of the interchange left a few buildings isolated in the centre of the roundabout, including the Archway Tavern, made famous on the cover of The Kinks' 1971 album "Muswell Hillbillies". [Citation
last =Abbott
first =Richard
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Dedicated Followers Of Kinks' London
newspaper =Mail on Sunday
pages =
year =
date =2002-04-14
url =
]

Churches

Holloway Road contains two significant London churches. St Mary Magdalene is situated in St Mary Magdalene Gardens near the southern end of the road. Built by William Wickings in 1814, it is one of the best preserved early 19th century churches in London. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Building
work =
publisher =St Mary Magdalene's Church
date =
url =http://www.n7parish.net/56.31.0.0.1.0.phtml
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-13
] Charles Barry, Jr.'s St John's Church is a leading example of Gothic architecture and dominates the northern end of the road.

Holloway Road in popular culture

Record producer Joe Meek, responsible amongst other things for "Telstar" by The Tornados, a massive UK and US no. 1 record in 1962, and the highly influential 1959 album I Hear a New World, lived, worked, and committed suicide at 304 Holloway Road, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Telstar: The satellite and the song
work =
publisher =Retro Future
date =
url =http://www.retrofuture.com/telstar.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-13
] where he is commemorated by an unofficial blue plaque (actually black). Sex Pistols singer John Lydon (Johnny Rotten) claims to have been born and raised in side-street Benwell Road, [cite book
last =Lydon
first =John
authorlink =John Lydon
coauthors =Zimmerman, Keith and Zimmerman, Kent
title =Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs
publisher =Plexus Publishing Ltd
date =2003
location =London
pages =
url =
doi =
isbn =0859653412
] although no documentary evidence survives of this. The road also features heavily as the home of a fictionalised Meek in Jake Arnott's "The Long Firm" trilogy, and was the setting for George and Weedon Grossmith's "Diary of a Nobody".

Railway stations on Holloway Road

As one of London's primary transport routes during the 19th century railway boom, Holloway Road contains a number of railway stations.

Highbury Corner is the site of Highbury & Islington station, one of London's most important transport interchanges. The Victoria Line, Great Northern & City Railway (now part of First Capital Connect) and North London Line converge at this location. From 2010 it will also be the northern terminus of the East London Line. [cite web
title =East London Railway
publisher =Transport for London
url =http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/projectsandschemes/networkandservices/2105.aspx
accessdate =2007-05-13
]

in 1944 and never rebuilt. The remainder of the building was demolished in 1966 in preparation for the construction of the Victoria Line; [cite book
last =Mitchell
first =Vic
coauthors =Smith, Keith
title =North London Line
publisher =Middleton Press
date =1997
location =Midhurst
isbn =1 873793 944
] the only surface building is a small entrance hall, set back from the main road and hidden from view behind a post office.

Holloway Road tube station opened with the Piccadilly Line in 1906, [cite book
last =Croome
first =Desmond F
title =The Piccadilly Line
publisher =Capital Transport Publishing
date =1998
location =Harrow Weald
isbn =185414 192 9
] next door to an existing Great Northern Railway main line station [cite book
last =Leboff
first =David
authorlink =
coauthors =Demuth, Tim
title =No Need To Ask!
publisher =Capital Transport Publishing
date =1999
location =Harrow Weald
pages =
url =
doi =
isbn =185414 215 1
] built in 1852. The main line station closed in 1915. [cite web
title =Holloway & Caledonian Road
publisher =Abandoned Tube Stations
url =http://www.abandonedstations.org.uk/Holloway_Caledonian_Road.html
accessdate =2008-07-17
] Although Holloway Road is the nearest station to the Emirates Stadium, trains do not stop here on match days due to concerns about overcrowding. [cite web
title =Get to Emirates Stadium
publisher =Arsenal F.C.
date =2006-08-03
url =http://www.arsenal.com/article.asp?thisNav=the+club&article=407516&lid=Emirates+Stadium&Title=Get+to...+Arsenal
accessdate =2007-05-13
]

Upper Holloway railway station was built in 1868 as part of the Tottenham & Hampstead Junction Railway. [cite book
last =Hornby
first =Frank
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =London Commuter Lines: Main lines north of the Thames
publisher =Silver Link
date =1995
location =Kettering
isbn =1 85794 115 2
] It is served by trains on the Gospel Oak to Barking Line, which now forms part of the London Overground network.

Archway tube station is not actually situated on Holloway Road, but approximately 10 m off the main road on Junction Road, underneath the architecturally striking Archway Tower. Originally known as "Highgate", it was the original northern terminus of the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway and until 1940 was the northern terminus of the Northern Line.

Archway Road

After the Archway roundabout, the A1 veers away from the historic Great North Road route into a cutting, and becomes Archway Road. The traditional Great North Road at this point heads up a very steep hill to the village of Highgate before passing back down on the northern side. By the early 19th century, this was proving unsuitable for increasingly heavy traffic, and the new Archway Road, crossing the hill at a shallower gradient, was authorised in 1810, financed by tolls. The tolls were abolished in 1876 and traffic increased substantially thereafter, particularly after the introduction of trams on the road. [cite journal
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Hornsey, Including Highgate: Communications
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =6
issue =
pages =103–107
publisher =British History Online
date =1980
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=22516
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-14
] In 1970 the road was substantially widened from the Archway roundabout to a point just north of the Hornsey Lane Bridge (see below). It was originally intended to widen the length of the road, but a successful protest campaign led to the widening being abandoned; this is generally considered the first successful road protest in the UK. [cite web
last =Stewart
first =John
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =A Road Can be Stopped!
work =
publisher =Road Block
date =2005-05
url =http://www.roadblock.org.uk/resources/roadsvictories.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-14
]

The road passes north in cutting in a short dual carriageway through Highgate Hill and under Hornsey Lane before narrowing back to a single carriageway and passing through the eastern end of Haringey. It then veers northeast, crossing the original route of the Great North Road at a point just west of Highgate Wood.

With the influx of Jews to London in the early 20th century, Archway Road became a focal point of London's Jewish community. Highgate Synagogue opened in 1930 at 88 Archway Road, and moved to 200 Archway Road in 1950. [cite journal
last =Croot
first =Patricia
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Islington Judaism
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =8
issue =
pages =117
publisher =British History Online
date =1985
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=5284
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-14
]

While Archway Road is an important shopping street, it lacks the large supermarkets and superstores of Holloway Road, and instead retains long rows of small specialist shops. [cite web
title =Archway Road
publisher =London Online
url =http://www.londononline.co.uk/area/Archway_Road_N6/
accessdate =2007-05-14
]

The large Jackson's Lane Centre, built in a large converted church near the peak of the hill, is one of north London's leading community arts venues. [cite web
title =About Us
publisher =Jackson's Lane Centre
url =http://www.jacksonslane.org.uk/index.php
accessdate =2007-05-14
]

Hornsey Lane Bridge

built a bridge, known as the Archway, to carry the ancient Hornsey Lane over the cutting. [cite web
last =Marsh
first =Majia
authorlink =
coauthors =Marsh, Brian
title =Victorian Observations
work =
publisher =
date =2002-02-10
url =http://www.btinternet.com/~initiative.cafe/TheGreatExhibition.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-14
] Between 1897 and 1900, Nash's bridge was replaced with the present cast-iron structure, officially called the "Hornsey Lane Bridge" but locally known as Suicide Bridge. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Event Queue
work =
publisher =NTKnow
date =2000-07-07
url =http://www.ntk.net/2000/07/07/
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-14
] Suicide Bridge is, as the name would suggest, one of the world's most significant locations for suicides, and is the only significant suicide bridge to pass over land rather than water. It was the subject of Johnny Burke's 2006 film "The Bridge". [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Special Screenings
work =
publisher =Rio Cinema
date =2006-04
url =http://www.riocinema.ndirect.co.uk/2006/Apr06/specialcreenings.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-14
] As one of the locations in London most associated with depression and mental illness, Suicide Bridge was the venue for the mental illness campaign group Mad Pride's inaugural vigil. [cite web
last =Dellar
first =Rob
title =Believing in Bedlam
publisher =Asylum Online
date =2002
url =http://www.asylumonline.net/archive/v13_n4_15-23.htm
accessdate =2007-05-14
]

The bridge is accessible from the Archway Road level by a steep flight of steps and as one of the highest points in London, it offers impressive views over London and is a popular spot for photographers.

Hornsey Lane Bridge marks the boundary between Islington and Haringey, and consequently the official boundary between Inner London and Outer London. Although technically the boundary runs down the centre of the bridge, in practice the bridge is treated as part of Haringey and the land beneath it as part of Islington. For historic reasons, the bridge itself is owned and maintained by the City of London Corporation.

Highgate Station & the Northern Heights scheme

Although Highgate tube station is today a minor stop on the Northern Line, under the Northern Heights project, part of the New Works Programme of the 1930s, it was to have become a major transport interchange. Only the low-level Northern Line station is now in use; however, Charles Holden's abandoned & derelict high-level interchange station remains standing and can be seen from the footpath parallel to Archway Road leading north from the station entrance. [cite book
last =Connor
first =J.E.
title =Finsbury Park to Alexandra Palace
publisher =Middleton Press
date =1997
location =Midhurst
isbn =1 901706 02 8
] On a clear day, the outlines of the London Underground roundel can still be seen on the brickwork of the station platforms. The abandoned railway lines south to Finsbury Park and north to Muswell Hill were converted to pathways in the 1970s, and remain open today as the "Parkland Walk". [cite web
title =The Parkland Walk, London, UK
work = h2g2
publisher = bbc.co.uk
date =2006-12-22
url =http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A17351976
accessdate =2007-05-14
]

Aylmer Road

At the northern end of Archway Road, the road re-intersects with the traditional Great North Road route (at this point called "North Hill"). The roads almost immediately re-diverge, with the Great North Road route heading north as the A1000 towards Finchley, Whetstone and Barnet and the A1 heading west as Aylmer Road. The two routes do not meet again until they converge at Hatfield, well to the north of London. [cite web
last =Merrington
first =Oliver
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Present A1 in London
work =
publisher =Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge
date =2002-05
url =http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/~ojm21/maps/presentA1.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

Aylmer Road is a very short stretch of road, running east for less than half a mile between the junction with the A1000 in Haringey to the junction with The Bishop's Avenue in Barnet, where it turns northwest and becomes Lyttelton Road. The entire southern side of the road is taken up by Highgate Golf Course, while the northern side is a mixture of small shops, flats and allotments. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Environment
work =
publisher =London Borough of Haringey
date =2007-01-31
url =http://www.haringey.gov.uk/index/news_and_events/fact_file/ward_profiles/fortis_green1/environment_fortis_green.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

The road is named for General Sir Fenton John Aylmer, VC KCB, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =150th Anniversary of the Victoria Cross
work =
publisher =Norvic Philatelics
date =2006-09-21
url =http://www.norvic-philatelics.co.uk/2006/09-vicx.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
] British commander at the Siege of Kut in World War I. He received the Victoria Cross for his part in the assault on Nilt Fort on 2 December 1891. [cite book
last =Napier
first =Col G.W.A.
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Sapper VCs
publisher =Museum of the Royal Engineers
date =1998
location =
pages =
url =
doi =
isbn =0 117728 35 7
]

The Bishop's Avenue

Immediately before becoming Lyttelton Road, Aylmer Road crosses The Bishop's Avenue. As with much of the surrounding area, this land was owned by the Bishop of London following a land grant in 704. In 1894, the Church let building plots for construction of homes on the road. In the 20th century much of the land was sold by the Church, which now only owns one house on the road (46 The Bishop's Avenue) and a nearby residential home. [cite journal
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Finchley Manors
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =6
issue =
pages =55–59
publisher =British History Online
date =1980
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=22502
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

Despite the relatively modest character of the surrounding area, this small 66-house street (and the parallel Winnington Road) have become the most expensive residential area in the world.cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Character Appraisal: The Bishop's Avenue
work =
publisher =London Borough of Barnet
date =1999-02-01
url =http://www.barnet.gov.uk/bishops-avenue-characterappr.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
] In 2006, the smallest houses in the street were selling for £5 million ($10 million), while a larger house was sold in the same year for £50 million ($100 million). Ten of the houses are owned by the House of Saud, whilst other notable owners of houses on the street include controversial businessman & fraudster Gerald Ronson, [cite news
last =Verdin
first =Mike
coauthors =
title =Guinness Four fail in fight for acquittal
work =
pages =
language =
publisher =BBC
date =2001-12-21
url =http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/1723136.stm
accessdate =2007-05-16
] pornography & newspaper magnate Richard Desmond (owner of two houses) [Citation
last =Walsh
first =Conal
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Down on Billionaire's Row...
newspaper =The Observer
pages =
year =
date =2006-04-30
url =http://observer.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0,,1764383,00.html
] and billionaire industrialist Lakshmi Mittal. [Citation
last =Kamal
first =Ahmed
author-link =
last2 =Barnett, Anthony, Morgan, Oliver and Connolly, Kate
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Labour's steel king backs US, not UK
newspaper =The Observer
pages =
year =
date =2002-02-17
url =http://observer.guardian.co.uk/politics/story/0,,651619,00.html
]

" ("Why not talk about Bishop's Avenue/I've got a lovely house on Bishop's Avenue"). [cite web
last =John
first =Elton
authorlink =
coauthors =Lennon/McCartney
title =Give Peace a Chance
work =
publisher =Northern Songs Ltd/Elton John
date =
url =http://www.eltonography.com/songs/give_peace_a_chance.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

Lyttelton Road

After crossing the Bishop's Avenue, the A1 becomes Lyttelton Road. Lyttelton Road was built in 1931 in an attempt to divert traffic away from the congested suburb of Finchley, and runs east-west along the northern foot of Highgate Hill between Hampstead Garden Suburb and East Finchley.

Lyttelton Road is for the most part a nondescript residential road, characterised by large detached houses built with the road in the 1930s. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =London N2 Guidebook
work =
publisher =Find a Property
date =
url =http://www.findaproperty.com/areaguidebook.aspx?edid=03&salerent=0&storyid=768&areaid=266
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
] Due to high traffic on the road and consequent noise and pollution, the houses are set much further back from the road than is typical for English housing, leading to extremely wide pavements and verges in addition to large front gardens. House prices are far lower than on surrounding streets, with houses typically selling for around a tenth of the price of similarly-sized homes on the adjoining The Bishop's Avenue & Winnington Road. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Street Prices by Locality
work =
publisher =Property House
date =2005
url =http://www.property-house.co.uk/postcode/N/N2.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
]

On the northern side of Lyttelton road stands the Belvedere Court block of flats. Built with the road in the 1930s, the building is now Grade II Listed as a leading example of 1930s architecture. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Index of Listed Buildings
work =
publisher =London Borough of Barnet
date =
url =http://www.barnet.gov.uk/planning-listed-buildings.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
]

Market Place

After passing playing fields to the south, Lyttelton Road crosses Kingsley Way and becomes Market Place.

As the name suggests, Market Place was formerly the site of a street market. Whilst no trace of the market now remains other than the name, this short stretch of road is still an important shopping district and the site of the local post office and library.

Falloden Way

Immediately west of Market Place the A1 becomes Falloden Way, which runs west before turning northwest and converging with the North Circular Road. Falloden is pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable.

Falloden Way was built between 1914 as part of a programme of planned extensions to Hampstead Garden Suburb [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Walk the Capital Ring
work =
publisher =London Borough of Haringey
date =
url =http://www.haringey.gov.uk/capital_ring_walk_11.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
] and runs on embankment due to a dip in the ground caused by the valley of Mutton Brook, which runs parallel to the road immediately to the south for its entire length. The north side of the road is occupied by 1930s housing blocks, whilst the southern side is occupied by a narrow strip of parkland following the brook, and by the northern tip of Big Wood & Little Wood (see below).

Falloden Way is a notoriously dangerous stretch of road. The layout of bus stops and misunderstanding/ignoring of rules regarding their use means buses are often forced to turn sharply out of the stops into fast moving traffic or to stop short of the bus stops presenting a hazard to other drivers. [Citation
last =
first =
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Dangerous bus stops on Falloden Way; impatient drivers should heed the Highway Code
newspaper =Hendon & Finchley Times
pages =
year =
date =2007-05-09
url =http://www.hendontimes.co.uk/news/letters/display.var.1385832.0.dangerous_bus_stops_on_falloden_way_impatient_drivers_should_heed_the_highway_code.php
] Additionally, the layout of pedestrian crossings mean a number of pedestrians attempt to run across the road rather than make their way to the inconveniently sited crossings. [cite web
last =Siva
first =Andy
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Golders Green Road to Falloden Way Safety & Pedestrian Improvements
work =
publisher =Transport for London Street Management
date =2001
url =http://www.tfl.gov.uk/streets/pdfdocs/schemes/A406%20Golders%20Green.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
] In 2006 two bus stops were suspended from use due to the hazards caused by traffic having to cross onto the wrong carriageway to pass stopped buses. [Citation
last =Dysch
first =Marcus
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title ='Danger' bus stops on A1 get safety makeover thanks to TfL
newspaper =This Is Local London
pages =
year =
date =2007-04-25
url =http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/whereilive/edgware/display.var.1353037.0.danger_bus_stops_on_a1_get_safety_makeover_thanks_to_tfl.php
]

Henly's Corner

The western end of Falloden Way is dominated by the complicated Henly's Corner interchange. The A406 runs from the northeast to converge with the A1 from the southeast. The roads run concurrently to a junction with the A598 north-south road, known as Finchley Road to the south of the junction and Regents Park Road to the north (confusingly, as the road is nowhere near Regents Park). The roads continue as a concurrency to the west, past the enormous Finchley Synagogue before diverging; the A406 turns sharply south to parallel Dollis Brook to Brent Cross, while the A1 turns northwest as Great North Way. Seven smaller roads also meet the A1 along the Henly's Corner stretch of road, while a complex system of subways beneath the interchange connect the various pedestrian footways.

Due to concerns about the safety of the underpasses, a number of people prefer to cross at surface level, leading to a number of serious road traffic accidents at the junction. There has been a sustained campaign in recent years to replace the subways with pedestrian crossings [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Subject Questions to the Mayor
work =
publisher =Greater London Authority
date =2005
url =http://www.london.gov.uk/assembly/assemmtgs/2005/mqtmay25/mqtmay25Item04.rtf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
] or footbridges. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Petitions
work =
publisher =Greater London Authority
date =2007-04-25
url =http://www.london.gov.uk/assembly/assemmtgs/2007/plenaryapr25/item04.pdf
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-17
]

Big Wood & Little Wood

Immediately south of Falloden Way are twin patches of woodland known as Big Wood and Little Wood. They are two of the few surviving remnants of the ancient woodland that once covered what is now north London. Big Wood covers a little over 7 hectares (70,000m²) while Little Wood covers around 2 hectares (20,000m²).

In 704 Wealdheri, Bishop of London was granted the land in the area by Tyrhtel, Bishop of Hereford. From the 8th century until 1933 the land continued to belong to the Bishop of London, the western edge of Big Wood marking the edge of the estate. At the time of the Domesday Book, the land was noted as being "capable of supporting 1000 pigs".cite web
last =Gregory
first =Colin
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Early History of the Suburb
work =
publisher =Hampstead Garden Suburb
date =1998
url =http://www.hgs.org.uk/cgi/framefinder.cgi?SECTION=/history&PAGE=h00110000
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

Over the years the forest was gradually cleared, leaving twin patches of isolated woodland. The exact dates are not known, but it is known that Big Wood and Little Wood were separated by fields by 1767.

In 1907, the woods became surrounded by the newly-built town of Hampstead Garden Suburb. Ownership of the land was ceded by the Bishop of London to the newly created Municipal Borough of Finchley in 1933, which in 1965 passed to its successor, the London Borough of Barnet. [cite book
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Big Wood
publisher =London Borough of Barnet
date =
location =
pages =
url =
doi =
id =
]

Big Wood is dominated by large oak trees. It also contains one of London's highest concentrations of Wild Service Trees, while the undergrowth is dominated by Ivy, Yellow Archangel, Common Bluebell and Guelder Rose. As a relatively isolated patch of woodland, it attracts large numbers of birds now rarely seen in the rest of London, particularly Owls and Green Woodpeckers. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =London Wildweb: Big Wood and Little Wood
work =
publisher =Greater London Authority
date =
url =http://wildweb.london.gov.uk/wildweb/PublicSiteViewFull.do?pictureno=1&siteid=5973
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

The nearby Little Wood, now separated from Big Wood by housing, is the site of the Garden Suburb Theatre, an open-air theatre built in 1920. [Citation
last =
first =
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Big Wood and Little Wood Trails
newspaper =Barnet & Potters Bar Times
pages =
year =
date =2002-03-04
url =http://www.barnettimes.co.uk/archive/display.var.54153.0.big_wood_and_little_wood_trails.php
]

The nearby Park Farm, on the opposite side of Falloden Way, was owned by circus proprietor "Lord" George Sanger between 1904 and Sanger's murder in 1911. Prior to the construction of the Denman's Drive housing on the field between Little and Big Woods, the field was used for grazing elephants.

Big Wood was declared a Local Nature Reserve in 1999, and is currently owned and managed by Barnet Council. The current gates to the wood on the western boundary are the Hampstead Garden Suburb war memorial and commemorate the 29 local residents who died in World War II. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Nature Reserves
work =
publisher =London Borough of Barnet
date =
url =http://www.barnet.gov.uk/index/environment-planning/countryside#bigwood
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-16
]

Great North Way

After the Henly's Corner interchange, the A1 turns northwest as Great North Way. The southern section of the road is mainly residential, whilst the northern stretch is dominated by Sunny Hill Park to the south and the sprawling fields of the Copthall Sports Centre to the north. The Copthall Sports Centre complex includes a large running stadium, a number of tennis courts, the ground of Hendon RFC, a full golf course, a Powerleague centre and, unusually, a large cemetery. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =London NW4 Guidebook
work =
publisher =Find a Property
date =
url =http://www.findaproperty.com/areaguidebook.aspx?edid=00&salerent=1&storyid=8349&areaid=246
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
]

Finchley Synagogue

On the Great North Way side of the Henly's Corner interchange stands Finchley Synagogue. Popularly known as "Kinloss", after a nearby street, it is one of Europe's largest Orthodox synagogues, with seats for 1,350. [Citation
last =McConnell
first =Sara
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Your guide to Jewish London
newspaper =The Times
pages =
year =
date =2006-09-01
url =http://travel.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/travel/destinations/england/article622569.ece
] While a synagogue has stood on the site since 1935, the current building dates from 1967. [cite journal
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Finchley Judaism
journal =A History of the County of Middlesex
volume =6
issue =
pages =91
publisher =
date =1980
url =http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=22512
doi =
id =
accessdate =2007-05-18
]

Watford Way

After passing the Copthall complex, the A1 meets the M1 motorway at Fiveways Corner. As most traffic leaves the A1 at this point to join the motorway, the road narrows north of this point. Immediately after passing Fiveways Corner, the A1 turns sharply north under the name of Watford Way.

Watford Way itself actually runs northwards from Brent Cross, well to the south. However, that section south of Fiveways Corner is designated as part of the A41 and is not part of the A1. Between Fiveways Corner and Apex Corner (see below) the A1 and A41 overlap. [cite book
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =A-Z London
publisher =Geographer's A-Z Map Company Ltd
date =2002
location =Sevenoaks
pages =
url =
doi =
isbn =1 84348 020 4
]

As the stretch of Watford Way north of Fiveways Corner was built as a bypass, and is also very close to the noisy and polluting M1, there is very little construction along this stretch of road.

Apex Corner

At the northern end of Watford Way is the large Apex Corner roundabout. The A1 and A41 separate, with the A1 turning to run straight north and the A41 turning west, while Selvage Lane runs southwest to Mill Hill and Marsh Lane runs northeast to Totteridge. Although Apex Corner is adjacent to the M1, there is no interchange with the motorway.

As the car parks of shops at Apex Corner overlook the Midland Main Line, the location is extremely popular with trainspotters. [cite web
last =Dawson
first =Albert
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Apex Corner Southbound
work =
publisher =Trainspots
date =2004-01-03
url =http://www.trainspots.co.uk/locpage.php?ts_number=60
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
]

Barnet Way/Barnet Bypass

After passing Apex Corner, the A1 runs north and out of London as Barnet Way (also known as Barnet Bypass), built in the 1920s to divert traffic away from Barnet. Although not technically a motorway at this point, the road runs as dual carriageway throughout and is treated as a motorway for most purposes.

After passing Scratchwood (see below), the A1 heads north, skirting Borehamwood, before turning northeast and running through open countryside to Bignell's Corner.

The "Thatched Barn" on the Barnet Bypass is reported to have been a secret Special Operations Executive base during World War II. [cite web
last =Moss
first =Richard
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Exploding Rats and Secret Cellars
work =
publisher =24 Hour Museum
date =
url =http://www.24hourmuseum.org.uk/trlout_gfx_en/TRA14554.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
] This has still to be officially confirmed.

The Barnet Bypass was also the location of the last Metropolitan Police Police box in use (prior to the reintroduction of a single new box in Earl's Court in 1996). [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =History of the Police Box
work =
publisher =policeboxes.com
date =
url =http://www.ibphoto.co.uk/policeboxes/pboxhist.htm
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
] The box was taken out of use in 1981, seriously inconveniencing the filming of the "Doctor Who" story "Logopolis" which required a functioning police box as a key element and was intended to be filmed at the spot. [cite web
last =Sibley
first =Anthony
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =The Barry Newbery Box
work =
publisher =The TARDIS Library
date =
url =http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~trekker/policeboxes/tv2.html
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
]

Moat Mount & Scratchwood

Just north of Apex Corner, the road passes the 140 acre (570,000m²) Moat Mount open space on the east of the A1. This large Victorian park is a popular camping and walking spot for north Londoners. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Scratchwood and Moat Mount Local Nature Reserve
work =
publisher =Hertfordshire County Council
date =
url =http://www.hertsdirect.org/comdirectory/comvol/enviro2y/envnaturereserve/518226
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
] A large camping and outdoor activity complex for schools, youth groups and probation services was opened in 1997, [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =About Us
work =
publisher =Moat Mount
date =
url =http://www.moatmount.co.uk/
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
] while Nan Clark's Lane, running through the park, is supposedly haunted. [cite web
last =
first =
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Moat Mount Walk
work =
publisher =Transport for London
date =
url =http://www.tfl.gov.uk/tfl/gettingaround/walkfinder/walkdetails.asp?id=99
format =
doi =
accessdate =2007-05-18
]

On the western side of the A1 opposite Moat Mount is the ancient forest of Scratchwood. In recent years, Scratchwood Service Station and the surrounding forest has become a popular spot for dogging. [Citation
last =Spender
first =Tom
author-link =
last2 =
first2 =
author2-link =
title =Sex and Danger
newspaper =Barnet & Potters Bar Times
pages =
year =
date =2004-03-11
url =http://www.barnettimes.co.uk/features/newsfeatures/display.var.468598.0.news_analysis_sex_and_danger.php
]

Bignell's Corner

At Bignell's Corner the A1 meets the M25 motorway at a large roundabout. North of Bignell's Corner the A1 becomes the A1(M) motorway, and rejoins the historic Great North Road route, running north to Edinburgh (see A1 road (Great Britain)).

References


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