Blakeney, Norfolk


Blakeney, Norfolk

Infobox UK place
official_name=Blakeney
country= England
region= East of England
shire_district= North Norfolk
shire_county= Norfolk
civil_parish= Blakeney CP
static_

static_image_caption =The Harbour, Blakeney, Norfolk
population= 789 (parish, 2001 census)
population_density=
os_grid_reference= TG020430
latitude= 52.95179
longitude= 1.02306
post_town= HOLT
postcode_area= NR
postcode_district= NR25
dial_code= 01263
constituency_westminster=
london_distance= convert|129|mi|km

Blakeney is a coastal village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk [ "OS Explorer Map 24” – Norfolk Coast Central. ISBN 0 319 21726 4 ] .The village is 21.1 miles north west of Norwich, 13.1 miles west of Cromer and 129 miles north north east of London. The village lies 5 miles north north west of the nearest town of Holt.The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The village is situated on the northern side of the A149 coast road which links the town of King’s Lynn to Cromer [County A to Z Atlas, Street & Road maps Norfolk, ISBN 978 1 84348 614 5] . Blakeney lies within the Norfolk Coast AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty) and the North Norfolk Heritage Coast. The North Norfolk Coastal Path passes through the village. [Ordnance Survey (2002). "OS Explorer Map 251 - Norfolk Coast Central". ISBN 0-319-21887-2.]

The civil parish has an area of 9.9 km² and in the 2001 census had a population of 789 in 402 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk. [Office for National Statistics & Norfolk County Council (2001). " [http://www.norfolk.gov.uk/consumption/groups/public/documents/general_resources/ncc017867.xls Census population and household counts for unparished urban areas and all parishes] ". Retrieved December 2, 2005.]

Description

Blakeney was a commercial seaport until the early 20th century. Now the harbour is silted up, and only small boats can make their way out past Blakeney Point to the sea. The harbour and surrounding marshes are owned by the National Trust and is a nature reserve where seals can be seen basking on the sand.

Just inland from the harbour is Mariners Hill. This vantage point is believed to be man-made, probably as a lookout point for the harbour. Adjacent to the hill, at the foot of the village's High Street, is the old Guildhall with a 14th-century undercroft.

Higher up the village, the Church of Saint Nicholas has two towers: the main tower is over 100 ft (30 m) high and a well-known landmark for miles around, and the smaller tower was built as a beacon to guide boats into Blakeney harbour.

History

In the Domesday Book of 1085 The Domesday Book, Englands Heritage, Then and Now, Editor: Thomas Hinde,Norfolk page 182/183, Blakeney, ISBN 1858334403] . In the great book Blakeney is recorded by the names "Esnuterle". The main landholder is Walter Gifford along with William de Noyers. Blakeney was formally called Snitterley and the settlement is first formally mentioned as Blakeney in a document which dates from 1340The Domesday Book, Englands Heritage, Then and Now, Editor: Thomas Hinde,Norfolk page 182/183, Blakeney, ISBN 1858334403] . Around the same period the then, King Edward III’s wife, Queen Philippa is said to have dined on fish caught by Blakeney’s fishermenThe Domesday Book, Englands Heritage, Then and Now, Editor: Thomas Hinde,Norfolk page 182/183, Blakeney, ISBN 1858334403] . In the 12th century Blakeney had a reputation for acts of piracy. In between 1328 and 1350 it is recorded that men of Blakeney boarded two vessels from Flanders and sailed them back to Blakeney haven were they were stripped of their cargoes. Many a foreign merchant ship which sort shelter in the haven found their cargoes stolen. Such was the lawless and treacheryThe Domesday Book, Englands Heritage, Then and Now, Editor: Thomas Hinde,Norfolk page 182/183, Blakeney, ISBN 1858334403] of the residence of Blakeney that the village refused to supply a ship which was to fight the Spanish armada.

Tourism

Because of Blakeney's location, it has become popular with tourists during the summer months. The village has two large hotels, The Manor, and The Blakeney Hotel as well as a 15-acre caravan site. Blakeney offers a large range of activities including crabbing, fishing, canoeing and birdwatching. The area of marshland around Blakeney Point is owned by the National Trust and up to a hundred species of birds can be found there throughout the year. As well as the natural features of the village, there are also several pubs in the area that serve food and real ale which attract many visitors.

ee also

*Blakeney Tower Windmill
*Blakeney Guildhall
*Blakeney Point

Gallery

References

External links

*oscoor|TG027440_region:GB_scale:100000|Map sources for Blakeney.
* [http://www.literarynorfolk.co.uk/blakeney.htm Blakeney literary Links]
* [http://easytide.ukho.gov.uk/EasyTide/EasyTide/ShowPrediction.aspx?PortID=0155A&PredictionLength=7 Tide tables] for Blakeney.
* [http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/b/blakeney/ Information from Genuki Norfolk] on Blakeney.
* [http://www.glavenvalley.co.uk/pages/else/webcam.php Blakeney webcam] includes tide times.
* [http://www.scenicnorfolk.co.uk/guide-to-blakeney.html Blakeney Guide and Photo Gallery]


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