Joop den Uyl


Joop den Uyl
Joop den Uyl
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
September 16, 1982 – December 24, 1987
Parliamentary leader - Labour Party
House of Representatives
In office
September 7, 1982 – July 21, 1986
Preceded by Wim Meijer
Succeeded by Wim Kok
Minister of Social Affairs and Employment
In office
September 11, 1981 – May 29, 1982
Prime Minister Dries van Agt
Preceded by Wil Albeda
Succeeded by Louw de Graaf
Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs
In office
September 11, 1981 – May 29, 1982
Prime Minister Dries van Agt
Preceded by Fons van der Stee
Succeeded by Jan de Koning
Deputy Prime Minister
In office
September 11, 1981 – May 29, 1982
Serving with Jan Terlouw
Prime Minister Dries van Agt
Preceded by Hans Wiegel
Succeeded by Jan Terlouw
Parliamentary leader - Labour Party
House of Representatives
In office
January 16, 1978 – September 10, 1981
Preceded by Ed van Thijn
Succeeded by Wim Meijer
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
January 16, 1978 – September 11, 1981
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
In office
May 11, 1973 – December 19, 1977
Monarch Juliana
Preceded by Barend Biesheuvel
Succeeded by Dries van Agt
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
February 23, 1967 – May 11, 1973
Parliamentary leader - Labour Party
House of Representatives
In office
February 15, 1967 – May 11, 1973
Preceded by Gerard Nederhorst
Succeeded by Ed van Thijn
Minister of Economic Affairs
In office
April 14, 1965 – November 22, 1966
Prime Minister Jo Cals
Preceded by Koos Andriessen
Succeeded by Joop Bakker
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
November 6, 1956 – June 5, 1963
Personal details
Born Johannes Marten den Uijl
August 9, 1919(1919-08-09)
Hilversum, Netherlands
Died December 24, 1987(1987-12-24) (aged 68)
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Nationality Dutch
Political party Labour Party
Spouse(s) Liesbeth den Uyl (1924-1990)
Alma mater University of Amsterdam (M.A., Dr.h.c.)
Occupation Politician
Civil servant
Economist
Journalist
Religion Reformed Protestant (1919-1943)
Agnosticism (from 1943)
Nickname(s) Uncle Joop

Johannes Marten den Uijl, known as Joop den Uyl (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈjoːp dɛn ˈœyl]; August 9, 1919 – December 24, 1987) was a Dutch politician of the Labour Party (PvdA). He served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from May 11, 1973 until December 19, 1977.

He previously served as a Member of the House of Representatives from November 6, 1956 until June 5, 1963. He became Minister of Economic Affairs from April 14, 1965 until November 22, 1966 in the Cabinet Cals. He became the Labour Party Party leader on September 13, 1966 and served as the Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives from February 15, 1967 until May 11, 1973 and again a Member of the House of Representatives from February 23, 1967 until May 11, 1973. Den Uyl became Prime Minister of the Netherlands, leading the Cabinet Den Uyl.

After his prime-ministership, Den Uyl remained in active politics and returned as the Parliamentary leader in House of Representatives from January 16, 1978 until September 10, 1981 and a Member of the House of Representatives from January 16, 1978 until September 11, 1981. He became Minister of Social Affairs and Employment, Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister from September 11, 1981 until May 29, 1982 in the Cabinet Van Agt II. After the fall of this cabinet, Den Uyl again became the Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives from September 7, 1982 until his resignation as Parliamentary leader and as the Labour Party Party leader on July 21, 1986, he was succeeded in both positions by Wim Kok. He served as a Member of the House of Representatives for the last time from September 16, 1982 until his death on December 24, 1987.

He was seen as an idealistic, but also polarizing politician. Throughout history, Dutch political leaders have tended to soothing manners - Den Uyl was one of a relatively few exceptions. People either loved him or hated him. Followers of his idealistic policies called him Ome Joop (Uncle Joop). [1] He was criticized for creating a budget deficit and polarizing Dutch politics.[2] Associated with Den Uyl was the maakbare samenleving (the makeable society, the idea that society is constructed and that government is a player in the construction). Another idea associated with Den Uyl was de verbeelding aan de macht (imagination in the driver's seat, the power of conceptual thinking, particularly in politics).[3]

Contents

Biography

Early life

Johannes Marten den Uijl was born on August 9, 1919 Netherlands Province of North Holland. He was born in a Calvinist reformed family. His father, Johannes den Uyl, was a shopkeeper and a basketweaver who died when Den Uyl was only 10. Den Uyl attended the Christian Lyceum in Hilversum from 1931 to 1936. Following this, he studied economics at the University of Amsterdam. During this period in his life he left the church. In 1942 he attained the doctorandus degree. Until 1945 he was a civil servant at the National Bureau for Prices of Chemical Products, part of the Ministry of Economic Affairs. During that period he was part of the underground newspaper group that published the clandestine Het Parool (The Password). After the Second World War he worked for Het Parool, Vrij Nederland, and other former resistance papers. From January 1949 to 1963 he was head of the Wiardi Beckman Stichting, the think tank of the Partij van de Arbeid (Labour Party, a Dutch Social democracy party). In 1953, at the invitation of the American government, Den Uyl stayed for a few months in the United States, gaining an appreciation of the American experience.[4]

Politics

Joop den Uyl as Minister of Economic Affairs in 1965.
Joop den Uyl as Prime Minister of the Netherlands in 1977.
Joop den Uyl after the fall of his Cabinet in 1977.
Joop den Uyl debating with future successor Wim Kok in 1982.
Joop den Uyl as the Parliamentary leader of the Labour Party in the House of Representatives in 1986.

In 1953 Den Uyl was elected to the city council of Amsterdam and in 1956 he was elected to the House of Representatives. In 1963 he became municipal administrator for economic affairs in Amsterdam, resigning his parliamentary seat. He resigned that post in 1965 to become minister of economic affairs in the Cals administration. As the responsible minister, he decided to close the uneconomic coal mines of Limburg, causing high local unemployment. Following the parliamentary elections of 1967, he became leader of the Labour Party in parliament.

Den Uyl's Labour Party won the 1973 elections in alliance with the progressive liberal Democrats 66 and radical Christian Political Party of Radicals, but failed to achieve a majority in parliament. After lengthy negotiations, he formed Kabinet-Den Uyl with the Christian-democratic Catholic People's Party and Anti Revolutionary Party. This cabinet faced many problems. An early problem was the 1973 oil boycot following the Dutch support of Israel in the Yom Kippur war. Den Uyl said in a speech on national television that "things would never return to the way they were" and implemented fuel rationing and a ban on Sunday driving.

Between 1973 and 1977, the country's economic situation turned ugly. The government's budget deficit increased tenfold, inflation approached 10 percent, the unemployment rate doubled, and the current account went from positive to negative – the latter a critical problem in a country that rises or falls on foreign trade. Despite economic difficulties, however, the government was able to enact a wide range of progressive social reforms, such as significant increases in welfare payments and the indexation of benefits and the minimum wage to the cost of living.[5]

In 1977 the cabinet fell due to a conflict between Den Uyl and the Catholic People's Party minister of Justice Dries van Agt. The Labour Party entered the elections under the banner "Vote for the Prime Minister". The Labour Party won by a landslide (it got over 33% percent of the votes, a relatively large share in the divided politics of the Netherlands at that time) and 53 seats. Labour's coalition partner Democrats 66 also made gains, from 6 to 8 seats. However, its other coalition partner Political Party of Radicals lost nearly all its seats, making it impossible for Den Uyl to form a new government that he could count on to support him in parliament. More than 200 days after the election, the Christian Democratic Appeal (a new party that was formed by Den Uyl's former coalition-members Catholic People's Party and Anti Revolutionary Party, joined by the smaller Christian Historical Union) formed a cabinet with the liberal People's Party for Freedom and Democracy, supported by a small majority of 77 seats (out of a total of 150).

After being opposition leader from 1977 to 1981, Den Uyl returned to government in 1981. The Labour Party formed a coalition with Christian Democratic Appeal and Democrats 66. Den Uyl became vice-minister president and minister for Social Affairs and Employment. Van Agt, by now Den Uyl's nemesis, led this cabinet. The cabinet was in constant internal conflict and fell after eight months. The elections of 1982 were won by the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy. Labour Party made few gains, Christian Democratic Appeal suffered light losses and the Democrats 66 lost most of its seats. Den Uyl returned to parliament and led the Labour Party in opposition until 1986. As leader of the main opposition party, Den Uyl - always a soft-spoken Atlanticist - provided cover for the government's controversial decision to place NATO cruise missiles on Dutch soil. In turn, this decision — and a similar one by the Belgian government — satisfied one of the West German conditions for the placement of cruise missiles and Pershing II missiles in West Germany.

Family and later life

Den Uyl was married to Liesbeth den Uyl. They had 3 sons and 4 daughters. Of those Saskia Noorman-den Uyl became a member of parliament for the Labour Party until 2006 and Xander den Uyl became a leading figure in ABVAKABO, one of the Dutch Labour unions.

After the elections of 1986, which he won, Den Uyl left politics. He was succeeded as leader of the Labour Party by Wim Kok. He died on Christmas Eve of 1987, aged 68, of a brain tumor.

Decorations

Quotes

"Twee dingen:..." ("Two things:..." In interviews, many of Den Uyl's answers started with these two words, sending a signal to the listener to drop any expectation of a simple yes or no.)

References

External links

Party political offices
Preceded by
Anne Vondeling
Party leader
Labour Party

1966-1986
Succeeded by
Wim Kok
Preceded by
Gerard Nederhorst
Parliamentary leader - Labour Party
House of Representatives

1967-1973
Succeeded by
Ed van Thijn
Preceded by
Ed van Thijn
Parliamentary leader - Labour Party
House of Representatives

1978-1981
Succeeded by
Wim Meijer
Preceded by
Wim Meijer
Parliamentary leader - Labour Party
House of Representatives

1982-1986
Succeeded by
Wim Kok
Government offices
Preceded by
Koos Andriessen
Minister of Economic Affairs
1965-1966
Succeeded by
Joop Bakker
Preceded by
Barend Biesheuvel
Minister of General Affairs
1973-1977
Succeeded by
Dries van Agt
Preceded by
Fons van der Stee
Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs
1981-1982
Succeeded by
Jan de Koning
Preceded by
Wil Albeda
Minister of Social Affairs and Employment
1981-1982
Succeeded by
Louw de Graaf
Political offices
Preceded by
Barend Biesheuvel
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
1973-1977
Succeeded by
Dries van Agt

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  • Joop den Uyl — Joop den Uyl, 1981 Johannes Marten (Joop) den Uyl (* 9. August 1919 in Hilversum; † 24. Dezember 1987 in Amsterdam) war ein niederländischer Politiker und zwischen 1973 und 1977 Ministerpräsident sowie zwischen 1967 und 1986 Vorsitzender der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Joop den Uyl — Mandats 11e ministre président des Pays Bas (45e chef du gouvernement) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Joop Den Uyl — (1919 1987). Premier Ministre des Pays Bas de 1973 à 1977.   Chefs du gouvernement des Pays Bas depuis 1848 Gerrit Schimmelpenninck | Dirk Donker Curtius | …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Joop den uyl — (1919 1987). Premier Ministre des Pays Bas de 1973 à 1977.   Chefs du gouvernement des Pays Bas depuis 1848 Gerrit Schimmelpenninck | Dirk Donker Curtius | …   Wikipédia en Français

  • den Uyl — den Uyl, a Dutch surname (in modern Dutch spelling rendered den Uijl), may refer to: Bob den Uyl (1930 1992), Dutch writer Jan den Uyl (1595/1596 1640), Dutch painter Joop den Uyl (1919 1987), Dutch politician and prime minister This page or… …   Wikipedia

  • den Uyl — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Jan Jansz. den Uyl (1595/96–1639), niederländischer Stilllebenmaler Joop den Uyl (1919–1987), niederländischer Politiker Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehre …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Den Uyl — Johannes ( Joop ) Marten den Uyl (* 9. August 1919 in Hilversum; † 24. Dezember 1987 in Amsterdam) war ein niederländischer Politiker und zwischen 1973 und 1977 Ministerpräsident und zwischen 1967 und 1986 Vorsitzender der Partij van de Arbeid… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Den Uyl cabinet — The Den Uyl cabinet (11 May 1973 19 December 1977) was a Dutch left wing cabinet under prime minister Joop den Uyl with ministers from PvdA, PPR, D66, KVP and ARP. The last two parties were actually moderately right wing, but left wing elements… …   Wikipedia

  • Kabinett Den Uyl — Das Kabinett Den Uyl bildete vom 11. Mai 1973 bis 19. Dezember 1977 die Regierung der Niederlande. Es handelte sich um eine Koalition der sozialdemokratischen PvdA mit den beiden kleineren, progressieven Parteien PPR und D66, die unterstützt… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Netherlands cabinet Den Uyl — The Netherlands cabinet Den Uyl (11 May 1973 19 December 1977) was a Dutch left wing cabinet under prime minister Joop den Uyl with ministers from PvdA, PPR, D66, KVP and ARP. The last two parties were actually moderately right wing, but left… …   Wikipedia


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