Manoel Ceia Laranjeira


Manoel Ceia Laranjeira

Manoel Ceia Laranjeira was a rebel Brazilian Bishop of the Independent Catholicism movement.

Biography

Born in Brazil in 1903, he was still active as a Bishop until the early 1990s.

Manoel Ceia Laranjeira was ordained priest by Roman Catholic Bishop Carlos Duarte Costa in 1947 and consecrated Bishop by Roman Catholic Bishop Salomão Barbosa Ferraz in 1951. He led the Brazilian Free Catholic Church after Salomão Barbosa Ferraz's submission to the Vatican, and renamed the movement the Independent Catholic Apostolic Church of Brazil in the 1960s.

He died in 1994 having been succeeded by Dom Lapercio Eudes Moreira and in turn by the current head of the movement, Dom Paulo Ferreira Da Silva as Patriarch and Dom Roberto Garrido Padin as Diocesan Bishop of Salvador de Bahia.

References


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